Monday October 14, 2019
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Russia’s Floating Nuclear Power Plant Ready for Operations

It is expected to be connected to the power grid by December 2019

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It is to be towed through the Baltic Sea and around the northern tip of Norway to Murmansk, where its reactors will be loaded with nuclear fuel, said Rosatom, who are the equipment suppliers and consultants for the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project in Tamil Nadu.
Representational Image, Pixabay

Russia’s Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation (Rosatom) on Monday said its floating nuclear power unit is ready for commercial operations.

In a statement, Rosatom said the two reactors of the floating power unit (FPU) were successfully brought up to 100 per cent capacity on March 31, and these confirmed operational stability of its main and auxiliary equipment, as well as the automatic process control systems,.

Director General of Rosenergoatom (the Energy Division of Rosatom), Andrei Petrov said that based on the results of these tests, the acceptance certificate for the FPU would be issued by authorities and the operating license will follow suit in July.

Representational image.

At the same time, onshore and hydraulic structures for the floating nuclear power plant (FNPP), as well as infrastructure ensuring the transmission of electricity to the local grid and heating for the city’s network, are scheduled to be completed by the end of this year in Pevek in Russia.

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The FPU is scheduled to be towed to the Port of Pevek during the summer of 2019 where it will operate as part of a floating nuclear power plant, replacing the capacities of the outgoing Bilibino Nuclear Power Plant and the Chaunskaya CHPP.

It is expected to be connected to the power grid by December 2019. (IANS)

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Russia Accuses Facebook, Google of Election Interference

“This can be considered foreign meddling into Russia’s state sovereignty and interference with the country’s democratic process,” the watchdog said in a statement

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Corporate, America, Climate Change
FILE - In this April 30, 2019, file photo, Facebook stickers are laid out on a table at F8, Facebook's developer conference in San Jose, Calif. The Boston-based renewable energy developer Longroad Energy announced in May that Facebook is building a… VOA

Many materials published on Facebook and Google resources can be considered interference in Russia’s internal affairs, said an official of the Russian Central Election Commission.

On Sunday, municipal and regional elections were held across Russia, with a total of 22 administrative centres electing city parliaments, and three regional capitals electing heads of municipalities, Sputnik news agency reported.

“Much of what is published there can be attributed to those materials that directly affect a person who is making a choice,” said Nikolai Bulayev, Deputy Chairman of the Russian Central Election Commission.

“If there is an influence, I’m sure that this can be considered as interference in internal affairs,” Bulayev told reporters.

google
FILE – A woman walks past the logo for Google at the China International Import Expo in Shanghai, Nov. 5, 2018. VOA

On the day of the elections, Russia’s communication watchdog, Roskomnadzor, said that it had determined that several US Internet giants — Google, Facebook and Youtube — had featured politically charged advertisements on their platforms, which constituted foreign meddling in Russia’s electoral procedures.

“After monitoring various media platforms on the day of the elections, it has been determined that Google’s search engine, the Facebook social media platform and Youtube’s video hosting service featured political advertisements.

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“This can be considered foreign meddling into Russia’s state sovereignty and interference with the country’s democratic process,” the watchdog said in a statement.

The Russian parliamentary upper house’s Commission on Protecting State Sovereignty will look into possible foreign meddling in the country’s local elections in the second half of September, the commission’s chairman Andrei Klimov said on Sunday. (IANS)