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Saira Banu celebrates Dilip Kumar’s 95th birthday

A dream of thousands of women to marry the one and only Dilip Kumar and Saira Banu was the luckiest of them all

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Saira Banu celebrating Dilip Kumar's 95th Birthday
Saira Banu celebrating Dilip Kumar's 95th Birthday . IANS
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  • Today is Dilip Kumar’s 95th Birthday
  • Saira says how happy she was to marry Dilip Kumar

Mumbai, December 11,2017: On thespian Dilip Kumar’s 95th birthday, his evergreen wife Saira Banu, 22 years his junior, says her marriage to him has been a “perfect dream”.

Dilip Kumar is recuperating from a bout of pneumonia. On his special day, a stream of visitors began trickling into their bungalow in Bandra here from early Monday morning.

Emotional about the love that her husband continues to receive year after year, the utterly devoted wife said: “Every year, I am asked the same things. What are we doing for Saab’s birthday? For those who don’t know, it is the day when our residence turns into a gorgeous fairyland.

“There are flowers everywhere from everyone who comes to pay Saab a visit on his birthday. It is a day when Saab’s brothers, sisters, relatives and come close friends come together.”

Saira Banu and Dilip Kumar got married in 1966.

“Seriously, there is no woman as blessed as I am… I thank my Allah every day for this. It has been my good fortune to be able to do anything for the man I love intensely. For me, it was always Saab, no one else. I was his fan from the time I can remember. While still a teenager, I wanted to be his wife.

“I am very headstrong and once I made up my mind, there was no stopping me. I knew many beautiful women wanted to marry Saab, but he chose me. It was my dream come true and that’s what my marriage has been, a perfect dream.”

Now she is devoted to taking care of her ailing husband.

“Looking after Saab, his life and his home comes naturally to me. All Indian wives look after their husbands. In my family, I’ve seen women being devoted to their husbands. I grew up watching that.”(IANS)

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Get Married to Have Better Bones!

Specifically, the authors used hip and spine bone-density measurements and other data to examine the relationship between bone health and marriage in 294 men and 338 women

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Get Married to Have Better Bones!
Get Married to Have Better Bones! Pixabay

Are you 25 or older? Getting married won’t be a bad idea for the health of your bones, especially spinal ones.

Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), found evidence that men who married when they were younger than 25 had lower bone strength than men who married for the first time at a later age.

“This is the first time that marriage has been linked to bone health,” said senior author Carolyn Crandall, professor of medicine at UCLA.

“There is very little known about the influence of social factors – other than socio-economic factors – on bone health,” Crandall added.

Among men who first married prior to turning 25, the researchers found a significant reduction in spine bone strength for each year they were married before that age.

Also, men in stable marriages or marriage-like relationships who had never previously divorced or separated had greater bone strength than men whose previous marriages had fractured, the researchers said.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

And those in stable relationships also had stronger bones than men who never married, said the study published in the journal Osteoporosis International.

The researchers used data from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study, which recruited participants between the ages 25 and 75 in 1995-96.

Participants from that study were re-interviewed in 2004-05 (MIDUS II).

Also Read: Sex Hormone Levels Linked to Heart Disease in Post-Menopausal Women

Specifically, the authors used hip and spine bone-density measurements and other data to examine the relationship between bone health and marriage in 294 men and 338 women.

They also took into consideration other factors that influence bone health, such as medications, health behaviours and menopause.

“The associations between marriage and bone health were evident in the spine but not the hip, possibly due to differences in bone composition,” Crandall said.

“Very early marriage was detrimental in men, likely because of the stresses of having to provide for a family,” said study co-author Arun Karlamangla, a professor of medicine in the geriatrics division at the Geffen School. (IANS)