Wednesday April 8, 2020

Saliva can Help Detect Surplus Body Fat in Teenagers: Study

Saliva helps in predicting various diseases in teenagers

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Saliva body fat
Saliva can also be used for early detection of the risk of developing diseases associated with surplus body fat. Pixabay

In addition to keeping the mouth moist and protecting us against germs, saliva can also be used for early detection of the risk of developing diseases associated with surplus body fat, a new study suggests.

For the findings, published in the journal Nutrition Research, the researchers in Brazil performed a study in which they used the level of uric acid in saliva to predict body fat percentages in teenagers and identify those with surplus fat even if they had no symptoms of chronic obesity-related disease.

The goal of the study was to identify reliable biomarkers in saliva that correlated with those found in the blood as a contribution to the development of quick tests to monitor health, especially in children.

The research showed the level of salivary uric acid to be a good predictor of body fat percentage even in adolescents considered.

“The idea is to enable saliva to be more widely used as an alternative biological sample for clinical analysis. The advantage of saliva is that it can be collected several times noninvasively and painlessly, like urine,” said study researcher Paula Midori Castelo from Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP) in Brazil.

Saliva body fat
Uric acid in saliva can help predict body fat percentages in teenagers and identify those with surplus fat even if they had no symptoms of chronic obesity-related disease. Pixabay

In the study, the researchers collected saliva samples from 129 girls and 119 boys. In addition to uric acid, they measured the levels of several other substances, including cholesterol and vitamin D.

The participants were aged 14-17 and were students at public schools in Piracicaba, São Paulo State. They first answered a questionnaire on their medical and dental history.

They also underwent an oral examination to exclude participants with cavities and periodontal disease (gum inflammation).

“Cavities and periodontal disease are known to influence salivary parameters such as pH (acidity), electrolytic composition and biochemistry. Both relate to the secretion of substances that can change the composition of saliva,” Castelo explained.

Also Read- Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables Reduces Risk of Memory Loss and Heart Diseases

Using linear regression (a statistical technique that analyzes the relationships between variables), the researchers were also able to predict body fat percentage based on the level of salivary uric acid.

“The level of this compound in saliva proved to be a reliable indicator of body fat accumulation, even in adolescents who were not being treated for chronic disease. It could be the basis for an accurate noninvasive method of monitoring dietary health and achieving early detection of changes in nutritional state,” Castelo said. (IANS)

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Consistent Bedtime Routine Reduces Risk of Obesity in Children

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Following a consistent bedtime routine may help reduce children's risk of becoming overweight or obese. Pixabay

Dear parents, kindly take note. Researchers have found that going to bed early and following a consistent bedtime routine may help reduce children’s risk of becoming overweight or obese.

“While we know it can be hard to get children to bed early, and at consistent times both on weekdays and at weekends, it might help parents or carers to know that establishing consistent and early bedtime may reduce the risk that their child will be overweight or obese,” said study lead author Yaqoot Fatima from the University of Queensland and James Cook University in Australia.

For the findings, published in the journal Acta Paediatrica, the research team wanted to explore sleep patterns in indigenous Australian children and assess the role of sleep timing in longitudinal changes in body mass index (BMI).In the study of 1,258 Indigenous Australian children were picked with an average age of 6 years.

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bedtime
The findings highlight the importance of looking beyond sleep duration and highlighting the benefits of early bedtime for children. Pixabay

Latent profile analysis was conducted with the Australian Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC) cohort data, to determine distinct patterns of bed and wake timing, taking account of weekday sleep duration, weekday and weekend bedtimes, and weekday wake times.

Multilevel models with a random intercept were used to investigate the role of baseline sleep pattern in predicting longitudinal changes in BMI.

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The researchers found that children who consistently went to bed late experienced greater weight gain over several years than those who went to bed early.

Also Read- Know How Smoking Cigarettes at a Young Age Can be Harmful

The findings highlight the importance of looking beyond sleep duration and highlighting the benefits of early bedtimes for children.

“As sleep timing is modifiable, this offers the opportunity for improvement in sleep and protecting against future weight gain in indigenous children,” the researchers noted. (IANS)