Monday January 21, 2019
Home Lead Story Samsung bring...

Samsung brings ‘invisible’ QLED TVs with Bixby voice control

the QLED series witnessed an overwhelming pre-booking response in India within a month of the launch

0
//
Television
Samsung brings QLEDTV with Bixby voice control to life. IANS
  • Samsung releases Bixby voice control in its QLEDTV
  • The QLEDTV  saw prebooking in large amounts
  • The TV is highly anticipated because of its many features

A second Nor’easter that hit the storm-weary US East Coast in less than a week with heavy snowfall, power outages and crippled transportation on Wednesday did not deter Samsung Electronics from unveiling its next-generation 4K QLED TVs that are set to redefine our living rooms.

The QLEDTV is highly anticipated.
The QLEDTV is highly anticipated.

The new line-up of flagship QLED (Quantum dot Light Emitting Diode) TVs – including the 85-inch, 8K Artificial Intelligence (AI)-powered TV – houses an “Ambient Mode” feature that mimics the pattern on the wall behind the TV to create a visual effect, in which the TV blends seamlessly into the wall like a chameleon. To achieve this effect, download the “Samsung SmartThings” app on your smartphone and take a picture of the wall.

The app — available for both iOS and Android devices — then sends the image to the wall-mounted TV and figures out how to fill the screen with that image. In a demonstration, this left only the TV frame to be visible, and the screen seamlessly merged with the colour of the wall.

“Ambient Mode” also provides useful information throughout the day like weather reports and important news of the day etc, even when someone is not actively watching the TV.

Also Read: Google withdraws YouTube app from Amazon Fire TV

With the intelligence platform “Bixby,” you can use voice commands to ask for your favourite movies or songs — along with controlling compatible Internet of Things (IoT) home devices like a robotic vacuum cleaner or cameras inside your home.

“Our 2018 line-up of televisions are most innovative and sophisticated yet, designed for today’s consumer who is mindful of the aesthetics of their space,” Jonghee Han, President of Visual Display Business at Samsung Electronics, told the gathering during the launch event at the American Stock Exchange here.

Ending months of speculations and teasers, Samsung’s flagship televisions — for which the price is yet to be announced — will be available later this month.

The Bixby launch conteol and amazing picture quality are some of the features of this TV.

The new QLED TVs don’t have clumsy cables around them. There is only one slim cable that sends both power and data (audio-visual content) to the TV.

Available up to 15 metres, the cable frees consumers from having to place their TV near data or power outlets. The cable is connected to a separate external box.

“We are excited for consumers to experience our new TV line-up and features that offer more freedom to decide where and how the TV can be best enjoyed within the home,” Han added.

Samsung also showcased “The Frame,” a customisable TV that can blend into any room like a photo frame hanging on the wall. Launched last year, “The Frame” houses artworks that have been contributed by renowned artists from across the globe. Samsung collaborated with world-renowned designer Yves Behar to develop “The Frame”. Out of the the new QLED TVs — Q9F, Q8F, Q7C, Q7F and Q6F — the Q8F and Q9F models deliver stunning images through Direct Full Array (DFA) technology.

The DFA technology uses a panel with zones of smartly-controlled backlighting that adjust automatically to deliver deep blacks and pure whites. The new QLED series supports Samsung’s new HDR10+ technology.

Also Read: Android Outpaces iOS In Smartphone Loyalty: Report

The company showcased “One Remote” technology where consumers can control most connected TV devices with just one remote control.Samsung also unveiled its expanded line-up of UHD, Premium UHD and Ultra-Large Screen TVs.

Apart from TVs, the South Korean giant also showcased a new audio line-up that included the “HW-K950 Dolby Atmos” soundbar; “HW-N650” soundbar for gamers; “HW-NW700” soundbar that features a wall-mounted design and “VL550” that includes a unique metal dial that consumers can attach to any metallic surface and use to control music with their voice.

Samsung has been ahead of the curve with innovations like LED TV, Smart TV, Curved TV, Curved UHD TV and now QLED TV and “The Frame.” As a market leader, Samsung registered 30 per cent share in the overall TV category and 50 per cent market share in the premium TV category in India in 2017.

Last year, the QLED series witnessed an overwhelming pre-booking response in India within a month of the launch, and the surprising trend was that 40 per cent of these bookings came from non-metros, the company said. IANS

Next Story

Technology That Allows Real Time Fact-Check May be Here Soon

Adair stressed that his product is nonpartisan. He believes television networks will catch on at some point because they will realize that their viewers want quick fact-checking.

0
Trump, Facts
Trump offers 'compromise' to end government shutdown. VOA

A Duke University team expects to have a product available for election year that will allow television networks to offer real-time fact checks onscreen when a politician makes a questionable claim during a speech or debate.

The mystery is whether any network will choose to use it.

The response to President Donald Trump’s Jan. 8 speech on border security illustrated how fact-checking is likely to be an issue over the next two years. Networks briefly considered not airing Trump live and several analysts contested some of his statements afterward, but nobody questioned him while he was speaking.

Duke already offers an app, developed by professor and Politifact founder Bill Adair, that directs users to online fact checks during political events. A similar product has been tested for television, but is still not complete.

The TV product would call on a database of research from Politifact, Factcheck.org and The Washington Post to point out false or misleading statements onscreen. For instance, Trump’s statement that 90 percent of the heroin that kills 300 Americans each week comes through the southern border would likely trigger an onscreen explanation that much of the drugs were smuggled through legal points of entry and wouldn’t be affected by a wall.

 

Trump, fact
Even Tim Graham, director of media analysis at the conservative Media Research Center, concedes that “we all understand that President Trump has a casual approach to factivity.” VOA

 

The Duke Tech & Check Cooperative conducted a focus group test in October, showing viewers portions of State of the Union speeches by Trump and predecessor Barack Obama with fact checks inserted. It was a big hit, Adair said.

“People really want onscreen fact checks,” he said. “There is a strong market for this and I think the TV networks will realize there’s a brand advantage to it.”

Networks mum

If that’s the case, the networks aren’t letting on. None of the broadcast or cable news divisions would discuss Duke’s product when contacted by The Associated Press, or their own philosophies on fact checking.

Network executives are likely to tread very carefully, both because of technical concerns about how it would work, the risk of getting something wrong or the suspicion that some viewers might consider the messages a political attack.

“It’s an incredibly difficult challenge,” said Mark Lukasiewicz, longtime NBC News executive who recently became dean of Hofstra University’s communications school.

Adair said the system will be automated. Mindful that many politicians repeat similar claims, the database will be triggered when code phrases that have been fact-checked before come up. An onscreen note would either explain that a claim is false or misleading and direct viewers to a website where they can find more information, or provide a succinct explanation of why it is being challenged. He envisions an average of one fact check popping up every two minutes. A network using the service would likely air the speech or debate on a delayed basis of about a minute.

Donald Trump, democrats, government,, pakistan
U.S. President Donald Trump. VOA

Lukasiewicz said network executives would likely be wary of letting an outside vendor decide what goes on their screen. Adair said anyone who uses the system would be given veto power over what information is being displayed.

CNN and MSNBC have been most aggressive in using onscreen notes, called chyrons, to counter misleading statements by Trump, although neither did during the border speech. Among the post-speech analyses, Shepard Smith’s rapid-fire reality check on Fox broadcast during the three-minute pause before Democrats spoke was particularly effective. But critics like the liberal watchdog Media Matters for America said anyone who turned the coverage off when Trump stopped speaking was exposed to no questioning of his words.

Complicated, cumbersome

“There is a responsibility to not just be a blind portal and just let things go unchallenged,” said David Bohrman, a former CNN Washington bureau chief who consulted on MSNBC’s 2016 election coverage. “The goal is a good one. The execution is a challenge.”

A technical junkie, Bohrman said he explored different approaches for real-time TV fact-checking while at CNN, but they ultimately proved too complicated and cumbersome.

US Senate
Network executives are likely to tread very carefully, both because of technical concerns about how it would work,. Wikimedia Commons

For networks, an incorrect onscreen fact-check would be a public relations disaster. Politicians also make many statements that a critic might question but isn’t necessarily factually incorrect. For example, Trump’s contention that there is a “crisis” at the southern border: Is that a fact or matter of interpretation?

Rest assured, people will be watching. Very carefully.

Even Tim Graham, director of media analysis at the conservative Media Research Center, concedes that “we all understand that President Trump has a casual approach to factivity.”

But conservatives are deeply suspicious that Trump’s words are being watched more carefully than those of Democrats. They will notice and take offense if Trump is corrected on the air much more than his rivals, he said, no matter if Trump actually makes more false or misleading statements.

Also Read: Technology Makes Home Items Smarter But Creepier

“People aren’t going to trust you,” he said, “because they know what the objective is. The objective is to ruin the president.”

Adair stressed that his product is nonpartisan. He believes television networks will catch on at some point because they will realize that their viewers want quick fact-checking.

“Anyone who criticizes will get criticized for criticizing,” Bohrman said. “But the reality is we may be able to help the viewers.” (VOA)