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Apple and Samsung are very big players, they can change scenarios for private sector manufacturing. LifetimeStock

Samsung is reportedly planning to launch its next-gen Galaxy smartphone on February 11 at an event in San Francisco and now a new report claims that the South Korean tech giant has chosen the S20 as the name of its next Galaxy S flagship, instead of the S11.

Tipster Ice Universe (@UniverseIce) recently shared a tweet saying that instead of opting for S11e, S11 and S11+ nomenclature, the company would opt for S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra naming for its flagship series. This means that Galaxy S20 will succeed S10e and S20+ will succeed S10.


In terms of specifications, the upcoming smartphones will use an Exynos 990 in some markets and a Snapdragon 865 in the majority of markets.


To get ahead in the fast-changing tech industry, Samsung said it will expand investment in burgeoning tech segments to propel growth. Wikimedia Commons

The base variant, that is, Galaxy S20 is expected to feature a 6.2-inch screen, S20+ is expected to sport a 6.7-inch screen.

Meanwhile, the top variant Galaxy 20 Ultra is likely to come with a 6.9-inch screen.

Also Read: Tech Giant Apple Inks Deal with UK-based Chipmaker

In terms of optics, Galaxy S20 and Galaxy S20+ are expected to have a quad-camera setup highlighted by a 108MP main sensor that delivers 12MP photos from a 9-in-1 binning method. (IANS)


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