Sunday May 26, 2019
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Sanskrit binds India and Lithuania together

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New Delhi: The Make in India Week in Mumbai witnessed the arrival of Lithuania ambassador Laimonas Talat-Kelpša. It was also the 98th anniversary of Lithuania’s independence. On behalf of the country, Prime Minister Narendra Modi was presented with a unique gift: a specially published small Sanskrit-Lithuanian dictionary.

A common Indian might feel the presence of this exotic-sounding European country, an uncanny one.

With the fastest public WiFi in whole Europe, Lithuania has been ranked as the 20th best country for doing business this year; standing at number eight in ease of starting a business and taking it less than three days to start a new venture there.

However, with the active involvement of Lithuania in the club of world’s leading economies, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and with India upping its game in making a global presence, the two countries seem to strengthen and renew their ties.

PM bestowed with Sanskrit-Lithuanian dictionary

A small Sanskrit-Lithuanian dictionary was published and gifted to Prime Minister Narendra Modi during the Make in India Week program in Mumbai.

This shows how both countries use common words in their every dialect which helps in generating a positive energy. This further strengthens Indo-Lithuanian ties, with people in authority able to reconnect and make significant international trading decisions.

Why the unfamiliarity with Lithuania?

Often mistaken for Ludhiana in Punjab, the place is uncommon to the Indian ear. Lithuania is lesser known in India due to various reasons:

  • The linguistic connection shared by India and Lithuania is bound till academics only.
  • Constrained in World War II and Cold War, ties could not be built with Lithuania. This was because India didn’t hold the adequate freedom to take actions of its own.
  • Also, previous 24 years of our diplomatic ties included high-level visits and large-scale initiatives; this made relations good but limited.

Indo-Lithuania- interweaved with striking similarities

  • The striking resemblance of words and grammatical structures in Sanskrit and Lithuanian, smoothly overlapping into modern Hindi.
  • Many words like dievas (देव)- when we appeal to God, labas (लाभ)- wishing each other wealth and prosperity, ašara(अश्रु)- tears of joy and sorrow, and sapnas (सपना)- dreams, are a part of Hindi and Lithuanian language.
  • Making Indian presence in Lithuania more prominent, a ten-fold rise in the past three years in the number of Indian students seeking education opportunities in Lithuania has been witnessed.
  • With 66 percent increase, Indo-Lithuanian trade crossed the EUR100m mark. The steady growth will significantly increase with the upcoming conclusion of Bilateral Trade and Investment Agreement between India and the European Union.
  • Commercial links have been expanding, despite the difficult economic situation worldwide.

The future to come

Upcoming years could be challenging but opportunities would be in the bounty:

  • Intensified high-level visits between the two countries, supported by business delegations and extensive cultural programs.
  • In 2017, India and Lithuania will celebrate 25 years of their diplomatic relations. With India celebrating its 70th anniversary that year, Lithuania will be celebrating its Centennial in 2018.
  • Important agreements in areas of Agriculture, Cultural Exchange, Extradition, and Science & Technology, are already under negotiation, paving the way for speedy implementation.
  • After an impending decision being considered for the past ten years, Indian resident mission may open soon in Lithuania.
  • Also, Prime Minister Narendra Modi may choose to become the first Indian leader to visit Lithuania and the Baltic States, signifying deeper ties.

Just like India, Lithuania is a country built from scratch. Accomplishing 37th position in the UN Human Development Index, the nation boasts of excellent social and educational conditions. All this achieved in mere 26 years. Therefore, India understands its hard-earned transformation best. (Inputs from ibnlive.com)(Image source: wikimedia.org)

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Explore the Most Visited Cities of Romania

There are even reports of human and extraterrestrial meetings in the Hoia-Baciu forest. Others have also claimed the presence of a monster in the nearby Lake Tarnita.

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Romania
The official language of the country is Romanian while Albanian and Armenian are some of the recognized regional languages.

Romania is a sovereign country in southeastern Europe that is experiencing an increasing trend in tourism. Bucharest is the capital and largest city in the country with the greatest number of visitors annually. The official language of the country is Romanian while Albanian and Armenian are some of the recognized regional languages.

The Romans are the predominant ethnic group and make up 88.9% of the total population. By 2011, the country was very urbanized with 54% of the population living in urban areas, but most moved to the countryside. In this article, we will discuss some of the major cities in Romania that you can visit while exploring this historic place.

Bucharest

Bucharest
At present, the city has an estimated population of 1.8 million inhabitants. The quality of life in Bucharest is not appealing.

Bucharest is the largest city in Romania and is the country’s capital, culture, industry and financial center. The city has increasingly become popular among international visitors for low prices and amazing Bucharest bachelor weekend parties. Some of the old buildings in the city center were severely damaged by war, earthquakes and Nicolae Ceausescu’s systemization program. It has been an economic and industrial boom in the city in the past.

At present, the city has an estimated population of 1.8 million inhabitants. The quality of life in Bucharest is not appealing. Living conditions have deteriorated over time and ranked 108th in 2009 in 235 cities. Notable landmarks in the city include; Triumphal arch, carousel bookstore, and Ion Luca Carnegie charter.

Constanta

tourism
The most important economic activities are tourism, industrialization, and fishing. In the first half of 2008, 3,144 companies were established in the city.

Constanta is the oldest city inhabited in the country after being formed in 600 BC. It has a population of 283,872 people making it the fifth largest city in the country by population. Constanta is a coastal city and receives a large number of tourists annually. In the 1930s during the inter-war, the city was the country’s commercial hub.

Like many coastal cities, Constanta is experiencing one of the warmest temperatures in the country. The most important economic activities are tourism, industrialization, and fishing. In the first half of 2008, 3,144 companies were established in the city. The most notable landmarks in the city are; the genuine lighthouse, the Carol 1 mosque, the house with lions, the cathedral of saints and the ottoman hunting mosque.

Cluj-Napoca

Cluj
The state’s Matthias Corvinus and Central Park fountain are some of the city’s attractions. There are a large number of visitors in the city with a majority of those coming on a day visit.

Ranking third among the largest cities in Romania, called Cluj-Napoca commonly known as Cluj. It was founded in 1213 and is the second most popular city in the country. The city is surrounded by forests and grasslands with rare species such as a Venus slipper. There are animals such as bears, mammals, foxes, rabbits, and squirrels in the Faget and Hoia nearby forests.

There are even reports of human and extraterrestrial meetings in the Hoia-Baciu forest. Others have also claimed the presence of a monster in the nearby Lake Tarnita. There are many large castles in the surrounding countryside surrounded by medieval families living in the city. The state’s Matthias Corvinus and Central Park fountain are some of the city’s attractions. There are a large number of visitors in the city with a majority of those coming on a day visit.

Iași

Romania
The fourth largest city in Romania is home to some of the oldest churches and monasteries dating back more than five hundred years ago.

This city is one of the cultural capitals of Romania and is a symbol of Romanian history. It is home to the country’s oldest university and the first technical school. It is an important education and research center in Romania and holds more than 60,000 students in five public universities.

Also Read: Russian Hackers Targeting European Embassies: Report

The fourth largest city in Romania is home to some of the oldest churches and monasteries dating back more than five hundred years ago. Significant buildings in the city include; Central Hall Square, Cuza Place, Dosoftei House, and Razvan Palace.