Wednesday April 24, 2019

Santa Clarita in California to get its First Hindu Temple due to growing Population of Indians and Hindus in the Valley

The City of Santa Clarita is the third largest city in Los Angeles County, California and the seventeenth largest in the state of California.

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Santa Clarita, Wikimedia

Delhi, Dec 23, 2016: Santa Clarita residents are raising funds to construct the first ever Hindu temple in the Santa Clarita Valley. The temple will be called ‘Siddhivinayaka Temple’ and will have Lord Ganesh as the main deity.

Reason behind the idea of a temple in Santa Clarita Valley:

Ritu Khadiya, a volunteer with the Hindu Temple says that to make a visit to a temple, the residents of Santa Clarita have to travel really far. She said,” Santa Clarita is one valley that doesn’t have anything to do with a Hindu temple — for a temple, (SCV residents seeking a Hindu temple) have to go all the way up to the (San Fernando) Valley, North and Palmdale, mentioned hometownstation.com.

We have been thinking about it for past 2-3 years to have something for our community out right here.” Khadiya also gave a statement saying,”Kids need to learn about our culture too, we are very bound to our culture and we are strong about it also. We wanted to start something out here so that they get a little bit taste of all festivals, all cultural programs in Hindu society.”

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Choosing Lord Ganesha as the main deity:

Khadiya also gave reasons behind choosing Lord Ganesha to be the main deity of the temple. She said, “Ganesha is lord of good luck, and we pray him when we start something new and so that’s what was the whole idea behind it.” The group of volunteers who are actively behind the concept of this Hindu temple actually thought about it during the festival of Ganesha Chaturthi in September this year. “We were sitting together at Ganesha festival, and everyone came up with same name — ‘Let’s start with Siddhivinayak temple,” she said, referring to the famous Mumbai place of worship.

Contribution and Funding:

A total amount of $51,000 is needed for the temple and the community has already raised about 10 percent of that target in just a few short months. Khadiya also said, ”We are very open to collect money for one time right now, because we have a saying in our culture — if you open a temple, the temple runs by itself so we really are looking forward to collect funds and open the temple by the end of January 2017. We have a GOFUNDME me through Facebook, the biggest thing we have right now is you can go into on our website, and you can just click on fund me out there, it’s very safe and goes directly to the funds account and it is tax-deductible, too.”

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People of Santa Clarita valley can also contribute by volunteering for various services like helping the priest, volunteering for festivities etc. Ritu further mentioned that there are many volunteers from Santa Clarita who are working very hard towards an early opening of the temple.

– prepared by Shambhavi Sinha of NewsGram. Twitter:  @shambhavispeaks

 

Next Story

Hindu Icons Which Have Spiritual Significance

These icons have to be treated with extreme respect and should not be touched or removed without the owners consent.

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rangoli
Rangoli, Toran, Aum and Swastika – optional display inside or outside the home. Pixabay

Hindu Council of Australia has compiled a list of Hindu Icons that Hindus may wear on their body and which have spiritual significance. This list has been made to remove confusion among non-Hindus about what is sacred to Hindus.

Hindu Sacraments worn on the body

Hindu icons all year round

bangles
Bangles worn on wrists by women – a cultural item. Pixabay

Scared Hindu icons that can not be removed

  1. Nose stud – essential for girls during puberty, can not be removed for one year.
  2. Yajnopavit/Janaue – essential for boys after their Yajnopavit right of passage, once worn can not be removed and worn again without extensive rituals (not even during swimming lessons)
  3. Sindoor/Mangalsutra – essential for married women. Removal is not permitted while husband is alive.
  4. Choti/Shikha – small hair tail for boys during a right of passage.
  5. Pagdi (Turban, A cloth wrapped around the head) – touching or removing it is disrespectful. It can be removed for a short period in privacy, like when having a shower and must be worn as soon as possible.
  6. Sivalingam (Veera and Adi Shiva people, Lingayat) or other Hindu Gods as pendant in a necklace.

Sacred Hindu icons that can be removed by the wearer

  1. Bindi – optional for women and girls, it can not be removed by others.
  2. Bangles worn on wrists by women – a cultural item
  3. Kondhani – a bracelet made of black thread worn around the waist
  4. Anklets (Pahjeb, Payal) – a metal bracelet worn on ankles
  5. Ear rings/studs for boys and girls in some families
  6. Gem stone on rings for special effects of planets
  7. Hindu Sacraments worn on Special Occasions

    Anklets (Pahjeb, Payal) – a metal bracelet worn on ankles
    Anklets (Pahjeb, Payal) – a metal bracelet worn on ankles. Pixabay
  1. Tulsi Mala – A necklace of Tulsi beads. During special religious observations.
  2. Teeka, Tilak, Vibhuti – essential during Hindu prayers, optional otherwise
  3. Mehendi/henna/turmeric – essential when getting married or when a close family member gets married, optional for married women during karva chauth day. Henna is a fast colour (looks like a emporary tatto) that takes a week or more to fade away
  4. Men are not allowed to cut their hair during Sabramalai month (Mid of November to January 14/15)
  5. Rakhi – a special bracelet worn on special festival day of Rakhi.
  6. Kajal/Surma (dark black eye ointment)
  7. Raksha/mouli – multi colour thread bracelet as a protective icon during special days
  8. Gajra – a flower arrangement by woman at the back of there hair.

Hindu icons in a Hindu home

These icons have to be treated with extreme respect and should not be touched or removed without the owners consent.

  1. Rangoli, Toran, Aum and Swastika – optional display inside or outside the home.
  2. Home shrine

(Originally Published: Hindu Council of Australia)