Friday April 19, 2019

‘Saraswati’ : Indian Scientists Discover huge supercluster of Galaxies

An Indian scientist has successfully discovered a new supercluster of galaxies that he has named 'Saraswati'

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Saraswati
Earth is part of the Milky way galaxy. Wikimedia
  • A team of Indian astronomers has detected a huge supercluster of galaxy that they have named ‘Saraswati’
  • This newly discovered galaxy is said to be as big as 20 million billion suns
  • 4,000 million light years away from Earth, the Saraswati is Earth’s largest neighborhood structure

July 14, 2017: A huge supercluster of galaxies was discovered by astronomers from India. The galaxy, named ‘Saraswati’, is as big as 20 million billion suns.

The newly discovered galaxy is the largest known structure in the neighborhood of the universe. It is approximately 4,000 million light-years away from the Earth. It is more than 10 billion years old. The mass of the galaxy extends over 600 million light years.

The team members include Pratik Dabhade, a research fellow at Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), Shishir Sankhyayan, a student at Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Joe Jacob, a student at Kerala’s Newman College and lastly Prakash Sarkar from National Institute of Technology, Jamshedpur.

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The team’s research has been published in the Astrophysical Journal which is a prestigious Journal of the American Astronomical Society.

The team analyzed the data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a large spectroscopic survey of different galaxies.

It is estimated that there are 10 million superclusters in the whole universe. The milky way galaxy, where our planet Earth lives, is the part Laniakea cluster.

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2393

Next Story

Apple’s Recycling Robot Is Capable of Disassembling 200 iPhones Per Hour

In 2018, the company refurbished more than 7.8 million Apple devices and helped divert more than 48,000 metric tons of electronic waste from landfills. 

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Apple has received nearly one million devices through its programmes and each Daisy can disassemble 1.2 million devices per year. Pixabay

 Apple on Thursday announced to expand its global recycling programmes and introduced Daisy, its recycling robot that is capable of disassembling 200 iPhones per hour.

US customers can send their iPhones to be disassembled by Daisy which is 33 feet long, has five arms and can methodically deconstruct any of 15 iPhone models.

Daisy will disassemble and recycle select used iPhones returned to Best Buy stores throughout the US and KPN retailers in the Netherlands, the company said in a statement ahead of Earth Day that falls on April 22.

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For cobalt, which is a key battery material, Apple sends iPhone batteries recovered by Daisy upstream in its supply chain. Pixabay

Apple also announced the opening of its “Material Recovery Lab” dedicated to discovering future recycling processes in Austin, Texas.

The Lab will work with Apple engineering teams as well as academia to address and propose solutions to today’s industry recycling challenges.

“Advanced recycling must become an important part of the electronics supply chain, and Apple is pioneering a new path to help push our industry forward,” said Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives.

Apple has received nearly one million devices through its programmes and each Daisy can disassemble 1.2 million devices per year.

In 2018, the company refurbished more than 7.8 million Apple devices and helped divert more than 48,000 metric tons of electronic waste from landfills.

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The Lab will work with Apple engineering teams as well as academia to address and propose solutions to today’s industry recycling challenges. Pixabay

Daisy can take apart iPhones to recover materials such as cobalt, aluminum and tin, which are then recycled back into the manufacturing process.

Once materials have been recovered by Daisy, they are recycled back into the manufacturing process.

Also Read: Parkinson Treatment Possible Through A Blood Pressure Drug

For cobalt, which is a key battery material, Apple sends iPhone batteries recovered by Daisy upstream in its supply chain.

They are then combined with scrap from select manufacturing sites and, for the first time, cobalt recovered through this process is now being used to make brand-new Apple batteries. (IANS)