Saturday, September 19, 2020
Home Lead Story Saturn's Moon Titan Drifting a Hundred Times Faster Than Expected: Scientists

Saturn’s Moon Titan Drifting a Hundred Times Faster Than Expected: Scientists

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has helped scientists to discover that Saturn's moon Titan is drifting at a speed of about 11 centimetres per year

Using data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, scientists have discovered that Saturn’s moon Titan is drifting a hundred times faster than previously understood — about 11 centimetres per year as per Science and technology.

The findings, published in the journal Nature Astronomy, may help address an age-old question.

While scientists know that Saturn formed 4.6 billion years ago in the early days of the solar system, there’s more uncertainty about when the planet’s rings and its system of more than 80 moons formed.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter to stay updated.

Titan is currently 1.2 million kilometres from Saturn. The revised rate of its drift suggests that the moon started out much closer to Saturn, which would mean the whole system expanded more quickly than previously believed.

“This result brings an important new piece of the puzzle for the highly debated question of the age of the Saturn system and how its moons formed,” said lead author of the work Valery Lainey who conducted the research as a scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California before joining the Paris Observatory at PSL University.

As the moon orbits, its gravity pulls on the planet, causing a temporary bulge in the planet as it passes.

Over time, the energy created by the bulging and subsiding transfers from the planet to the moon, nudging it farther and farther out.

Our own Moon drifts 3.8 centimeters from Earth each year.

To reach their results about Titan, the scientists mapped stars in the background of Cassini images and tracked Titan’s position.

saturn Titan
Titan is currently 1.2 million kilometres from Saturn. Wikimedia Commons

Also Read: Tesla Needs to Address Model Y Production Challenges: Musk

To confirm their findings, they compared them with an independent dataset: radio science data collected by Cassini.

During 10 close flybys between 2006 and 2016, the spacecraft sent radio waves to Earth.

Scientists studied how the signal’s frequency was changed by their interactions with their surroundings to estimate how Titan’s orbit evolved. (IANS)

STAY CONNECTED

19,152FansLike
362FollowersFollow
1,775FollowersFollow

Most Popular

Neglected Children More Likely To Have Teen Pregnancy: Study

Researchers have found that children who experience neglect are seven times more likely than other abuse victims to have a teen pregnancy. The study, published...

Sakharam Binder: Play That Explores Idea Of Censorship

Back in the early 1970s, Marathi playwright Vijay Tendulkar's play 'Sakharam Binder' -- which features the character of a bookbinder who 'takes in' women...

Patients With Covid-19 Likely To Diagnose With A Heart Stroke

Researchers have found that Covid-19 may be diagnosed on the same emergency scans intended to diagnose stroke. The findings published in the American Journal of...

Asian-Americans Experience Increased Racism Since Covid-19: Report

A report released by a US civil rights group showed Asian-Americans have experienced increased racism since the Covid-19 pandemic hit the country more than...

Hair Tips By Actress Kajol

Actress Kajol has often sported bouncy curls, and it is not too difficult to have hair like hers, she assures. Sharing a candid photo taken...

Twitter Halts Transparency Web Series Promotion. Is Twitter Biased?

By NewsGram Desk Twitter, a well-known platform to share ideas, thoughts, spread awareness, advertise our new ideas and projects, is suddenly taking down advertisements and...

Traditional Matchmaking Holds a Lot of Prejudiced, Preconceived Notions: Physician Rupam Kaur

By Siddhi Jain For Rupam Kaur, an Indian-American physician, the pursuit of finding love a second time took more than the traditional formula of meeting...

10 Facts on How Mosquitoes are One of the Deadliest Creatures in the World

A warmer climate, travel and trade are helping to spread mosquito-borne diseases as a deadly beast smaller than a paper clip poses a threat...

Recent Comments

Donate to NewsGram to support quality journalism.
x