Sunday October 21, 2018

Saudi Arabia: Women Face Punishment for Checking Husband’s Phone

The issue has become an online growing debate which has lead to approx. 35,000 tweets under Arabic hashtag which means “Flogging of A Woman Checking Her Husband’s Phone”

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Street Protest. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
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By Akanksha Sharma

In Saudi Arabia, women checking their husband’s phone will now be considered as the violation of privacy as it is not covered in country’s Islamic laws, says a senior lawyer Mohammad al-Temyat. Women will face flogging and imprisonment for this offence.

This issue has become an online growing debate which has lead to approx. 35,000 tweets under Arabic hashtag which means “Flogging of A Woman Checking Her Husband’s Phone”.
Mr. Al-Temyat said in an interview conducted by Makkah newspaper that individuals would be brought before the court if a lawsuit is filed against them.

A woman wearing burqa. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
A woman wearing burqa. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

A female twitter user protested and tweeted “They (men) get annoyed of women ‘only’ checking her husband’s phone while a woman lives all of her life in an ‘inquisition’. Whether that is regarding her clothing, sayings or behavior.”

Another person named Salim tweeted that in order to make marital life “less chaotic, a husband should share his private life with his spouse so that they can live a life free of suspicion.”

Related Article: Saudi Arabia: Another name for ‘Jihadi factories’

Meanwhile, Abdirahman stated significant problems in Saudi community, tweeting “what about a man who beats his wife? What about a man who does not give his wife her rights? The law should do something about this too.”

Mr. Al-Temyat told The Independent that he only provided legal advice to the government and described the act of checking someone’s phone as Ta’zir offence.

He said, “I would like to clarify that this subject involves the husband and the wife and it is a Ta’zir offence so it is possible that there is a flogging, a fine, imprisonment, just signing a pledge or even nothing.”

He further said that offense is not identified as a legal offence, so the punishment will depend on the damaged caused from it.

Akanksha is a student of journalism in New Delhi, currently interning with NewsGram. Twitter: @Akanksha4117

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Family Size Can Be Determined By Reproductive Rights: Study

To make freedom of choice a reality, the report urges countries to offer universal access to quality reproductive health care

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A community health worker holds up contraceptives during a lecture on family planning at a reproductive health clinic run by an NGO in Tondo city, metro Manila. VOA

Family size is closely linked to reproductive rights, according to the State of World Population 2018 report.

The U.N. report says people in developed countries tend to have lower fertility rates because of greater access to family planning services, modern contraceptives and age-appropriate sex education.

The director of the U.N. Population Fund office in Geneva, Monica Ferro, says in places where reproductive rights are constrained, either due to lack of resources or government mandates, people have a limited ability to choose the size of their families.

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Google suspends Ireland’s Abortion Referendum Ads, VOA

“Many sub-Saharan African countries, for example, have fertility rates of four or more births per woman,” Ferro said. “At the other end of the spectrum, you have some eastern Asian and European countries with fewer than two births per women. In both cases, individuals face obstacles to the full realization of their reproductive rights.”

The world population is expected to increase by 2.5 billion by 2050, to nearly 10 billion people, with sub-Saharan Africa expected to contribute more than half of that growth.

Women in Africa must overcome many legal and social barriers to achieve control of their fertility, Ferro said.

reproductive rights
Women in Africa must overcome many legal and social barriers to achieve control of their fertility.

“Women may not have the access to medical services,” she told VOA. “They may not have the access to child care. They may not have access to all the institutional and social support that comes with being ready or being able to plan your fertility.”

Also Read: Brisbane, Australia Protests Against Plans To Decriminalise Abortion

To make freedom of choice a reality, the report urges countries to offer universal access to quality reproductive health care, including modern contraceptives and better education.

It also advocates for a change in men’s attitudes toward a woman’s right to choose the number, timing and spacing of children. (VOA)