Sunday June 16, 2019

Saudi Arabia: Women Face Punishment for Checking Husband’s Phone

The issue has become an online growing debate which has lead to approx. 35,000 tweets under Arabic hashtag which means “Flogging of A Woman Checking Her Husband’s Phone”

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Street Protest. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

By Akanksha Sharma

In Saudi Arabia, women checking their husband’s phone will now be considered as the violation of privacy as it is not covered in country’s Islamic laws, says a senior lawyer Mohammad al-Temyat. Women will face flogging and imprisonment for this offence.

This issue has become an online growing debate which has lead to approx. 35,000 tweets under Arabic hashtag which means “Flogging of A Woman Checking Her Husband’s Phone”.
Mr. Al-Temyat said in an interview conducted by Makkah newspaper that individuals would be brought before the court if a lawsuit is filed against them.

A woman wearing burqa. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
A woman wearing burqa. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

A female twitter user protested and tweeted “They (men) get annoyed of women ‘only’ checking her husband’s phone while a woman lives all of her life in an ‘inquisition’. Whether that is regarding her clothing, sayings or behavior.”

Another person named Salim tweeted that in order to make marital life “less chaotic, a husband should share his private life with his spouse so that they can live a life free of suspicion.”

Related Article: Saudi Arabia: Another name for ‘Jihadi factories’

Meanwhile, Abdirahman stated significant problems in Saudi community, tweeting “what about a man who beats his wife? What about a man who does not give his wife her rights? The law should do something about this too.”

Mr. Al-Temyat told The Independent that he only provided legal advice to the government and described the act of checking someone’s phone as Ta’zir offence.

He said, “I would like to clarify that this subject involves the husband and the wife and it is a Ta’zir offence so it is possible that there is a flogging, a fine, imprisonment, just signing a pledge or even nothing.”

He further said that offense is not identified as a legal offence, so the punishment will depend on the damaged caused from it.

Akanksha is a student of journalism in New Delhi, currently interning with NewsGram. Twitter: @Akanksha4117

Next Story

Depression May Put Women at Risk of Chronic Diseases, Says Study

Women with both conditions — depression and chronic diseases — were more likely to come from low-income households, be overweight and inactive, smoke tobacco and drink alcohol

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Depression has significantly increased the risk of early death in women. Wikimedia

Women who experience symptoms of depression, even without a clinical diagnosis, are at an increased risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, according to a study.

The study, published in the journal American Psychological Association Health Psychology, examined 7,407 middle-aged women (45-50 years) for over 20 years.

During the study period, 43.2 per cent women experienced elevated symptoms of depression and just under half the cohort were diagnosed or took treatment for depression.

Of the total, 2,035 or 63.6 per cent developed multiple chronic diseases.

“These days many people suffer from multiple chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke and cancer. We looked at how women progress in the development of these chronic diseases before and after the onset of depressive symptoms,” said Xiaolin Xu from the University of Queensland in Australia.

Depression
Depression is a common mental disorder. Flickr

“Experiencing depressive symptoms appeared to amplify the risk of chronic illness,” Xu said, adding that women suffering from depression were 1.8 times more likely to have multiple chronic health conditions.

“After women started experiencing these symptoms, they were 2.4 times more likely to suffer from multiple chronic conditions compared to women without depressive symptoms,” he added.

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Women with both conditions — depression and chronic diseases — were more likely to come from low-income households, be overweight and inactive, smoke tobacco and drink alcohol.

“Maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, eating a balanced diet, and reducing harmful behaviours could help prevent and slow the progression of multiple chronic diseases,” Xu said. (IANS)