Wednesday December 19, 2018

Saudi Arabia: Women Face Punishment for Checking Husband’s Phone

The issue has become an online growing debate which has lead to approx. 35,000 tweets under Arabic hashtag which means “Flogging of A Woman Checking Her Husband’s Phone”

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Street Protest. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
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By Akanksha Sharma

In Saudi Arabia, women checking their husband’s phone will now be considered as the violation of privacy as it is not covered in country’s Islamic laws, says a senior lawyer Mohammad al-Temyat. Women will face flogging and imprisonment for this offence.

This issue has become an online growing debate which has lead to approx. 35,000 tweets under Arabic hashtag which means “Flogging of A Woman Checking Her Husband’s Phone”.
Mr. Al-Temyat said in an interview conducted by Makkah newspaper that individuals would be brought before the court if a lawsuit is filed against them.

A woman wearing burqa. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
A woman wearing burqa. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

A female twitter user protested and tweeted “They (men) get annoyed of women ‘only’ checking her husband’s phone while a woman lives all of her life in an ‘inquisition’. Whether that is regarding her clothing, sayings or behavior.”

Another person named Salim tweeted that in order to make marital life “less chaotic, a husband should share his private life with his spouse so that they can live a life free of suspicion.”

Related Article: Saudi Arabia: Another name for ‘Jihadi factories’

Meanwhile, Abdirahman stated significant problems in Saudi community, tweeting “what about a man who beats his wife? What about a man who does not give his wife her rights? The law should do something about this too.”

Mr. Al-Temyat told The Independent that he only provided legal advice to the government and described the act of checking someone’s phone as Ta’zir offence.

He said, “I would like to clarify that this subject involves the husband and the wife and it is a Ta’zir offence so it is possible that there is a flogging, a fine, imprisonment, just signing a pledge or even nothing.”

He further said that offense is not identified as a legal offence, so the punishment will depend on the damaged caused from it.

Akanksha is a student of journalism in New Delhi, currently interning with NewsGram. Twitter: @Akanksha4117

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Twitter Warns Unusual Activity From Hackers in China and Saudi Arabia

Importantly, this issue did not expose full phone numbers or any other personal data

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Twitter warns 'unusual activity' from hackers in China, Saudi Arabia. Pixabay

Twitter has warned of “unusual activity” from state-sponsored actors based in China and Saudi Arabia after it found a bug that could have revealed the country code of users’ phone numbers or if their account was locked.

The revelation led to Twitter stock dropping nearly 7 per cent on Monday.

In a statement, Twitter said it discovered the bug on November 15 and fixed it a day later.

“During our investigation, we noticed some unusual activity involving the affected customer support form API. Specifically, we observed a large number of inquiries coming from individual IP addresses located in China and Saudi Arabia,” said the micro-blogging platform, used by over 336 million users, on one of its support forms.

“While we cannot confirm intent or attribution for certain, it is possible that some of these IP addresses may have ties to state-sponsored actors,” Twitter warned.

Twitter, India, Smartphone
Twitter on a smartphone device. Pixabay

The bug, said the company, could be used to discover the country code of people’s phone numbers if they had one associated with their Twitter account, as well as whether or not their account had been locked by Twitter.

Twitter locks an account if it appears to be compromised or in violation of its rules or Terms of Service.

“Importantly, this issue did not expose full phone numbers or any other personal data.

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“We have directly informed the people we identified as being affected. We are providing this broader notice as it is possible that other account holders we cannot identify were potentially impacted,” Twitter said, adding it is “sorry this happened”.

A Twitter spokesperson told TechCrunch: “For our part, we are committed to understanding how bad-faith actors use our services. We will continue to proactively combat nefarious attempts to undermine the integrity of Twitter.” (IANS)