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Stock, Sip A Little Longer And Breathe In These Food Items Before You Regret

The rising emissions of greenhouse gases, erratic weather and temperature patterns might make us miss some of the food items

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cocoa
Eating cocoa may boost your Vitamin D intake: Study. Pixabay
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— By Shikha Jain

Besides affecting our moods and making us grumble more, the crazy weather will inevitably affect our food. We are not talking exotic sea creatures and rain strains of food flax, but chocolate, wine, honey and a few more, which may not be available for sale in the near future. Due to global warming and drought, the production of food is adversely affected as extreme weather events have already ravaged different regions of the world. Imagine a world where breakfasts would no longer be doused in maple syrup or a planet completely devoid of coffee. So, stock them up, sip a little longer and breathe in them before they leave you craving.

Chocolate:  You think you can’t do without chocolates? I insist you to think again. Because according to the experts the vicious circle of drought has affected West Africa, which manufactures 70% of the world’s chocolate. And gradually, it will reduce and may lead to unavailability of cocoa in the next 20-30 years. It is also said that we consume chocolates faster than it is produced.

Peanuts: Nuts might drive you nuts. These ‘fairly fussy plants’ require stable and particular environment to grow. Too little rain, the pods don’t germinate. Too much sunshine, the shoots wither. The production has shrunk in the last six-seven years and will continue to do so. Some say that peanuts might be extinct by 2030, so if no peanuts, no peanut butter. Ouch! But if they don’t, then it will become a luxury item and then be ready to shell out more money for it.

peanuts might be extinct by 2030
peanuts might be extinct by 2030. Pixabay

Maple Syrup: Pancake emergency! As sugar maple tree responsible for syrup is stressed to the point of disappearing, because of the unpredictable weather conditions. The maple, like peanuts is dependent on precise climate conditions of mild days and freezing nights that our ever-changing climate can no longer offer.

Chickpeas: What would Lebanese cuisine be like without hummus? The chickpeas need 76 gallons of water for every ounce and since there is not enough water, the overall production of legumes is declined by 40% around the world in the last one decade and expected to go down even more in the future. So at this rate, you better eat hummus while you still can.

Honey: No more sweet treat? Honey bee colonies are vanishing at an alarming rate and biologists had warned us about the colony collapse disorder – bees abandoning their hives over a decade now. Plenty of reasons are listed like, parasites, electromagnetic radiation, pathogens, genetically modified crops and many more. Climate change has restricted the areas for them, because humble bee species do not have the ability to easily adapt these changes, which shows the ripple effect in the production of honey.

Avocados:  Avocados and chickpeas are like brothers when it comes to their making. To make just one pound of avocado 72 gallons of water is required, and that’s about how much water is used in the four average American showers. It just so happens that more than 80% of avocados are grown in California, where there is a drought. So it might just exterminate before we could even think.

more than 80% of avocados are grown in California, where there is a drought
more than 80% of avocados are grown in California, where there is a drought. Pixabay

Coffee: Coffee lovers, alert! You got to find a new way to do away with your Monday blues, because your favourite relaxtant is on the path to extinction. It is anticipated that all types of coffee beans will be wiped off the face of the earth by 2080. The rising temperature ruins the plantation of the coffee beans. So, the next time, breathe in the aroma and sip on your morning coffee for a little longer.

Bananas: No more bodybuilding, because no more bananas. Yes, this popular five-a-day fruit intake is on the list of endangered food items. Since bananas rely on moderate weather to ripen and then consistent water to thrive, farmers are being forced to make heavy investments. And a fungal disease called ‘The Panama Tropical Race 4’ is also wiping out banana plantations across the globe.

this popular five-a-day fruit intake is on the list of endangered food items
The vitamins in banana maintain the elasticity of the skin and the antioxidants prevent aging. Pixabay

Fish: No more glowing skin? At the pace we are going the oceans will ran out of the fish by 2048. Overfishing, trawling, pollution and climate change are to be blamed for the disappearance of many aquatic species. As the ocean becomes warmer, there is a change in the ideal habitat temperature required by the water animals. Therefore, leading to shortage of fish.

Will there be no more wine festivals?
Will there be no more wine festivals? Pixabay

Also read: Seafood-Rich Diet May Up Pregnancy Chances and Sexual Intimacy

Wine Grapes: Will there be no more wine festivals? Because the major type of grape used for wine production is picked after the rain, and there is either uneven rainfall or no rain. But a glimmer of hope always exists. So, if wine growers begin to exploit the diversity of those other thousand wine grape varities in earnest, the industry could survive. After all, it’s all about adaptation.

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Climate Change’s Fight Harder Than Thought: Study

This new research suggests that accomplishing that goal requires countries to pull 25 percent more carbon out of the atmosphere than they've already committed to cleaning up.

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Oceans
People walk on the beach of Biarritz, southwestern France, along the Atlantic Ocean, Dec. 18, 2015. New research shows the oceans are storing much more heat than previously thought. VOA

A new report recently published in the journal Nature suggests the Earth’s oceans are absorbing more of the planet’s excess heat than previously thought.

Scientists have known for some time that oceans store excess heat energy, and this helps keep the planet in its balmy, just-right temperature for supporting the explosion of life on Earth.

Knowing how hot the ocean is getting, and how fast that temperature is rising, helps scientists understand more about human-impacted climate change. It helps them know how much excess energy is being produced, and it helps them predict how much heat the ocean is capable of absorbing and how much warming will be felt on the Earth’s surface.

Oceans, boats
Lobster boats are moored in the harbor in Stonington, Maine. VOA

Up until the report was issued this week, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) thought it had a pretty good handle on how much excess energy the oceans were absorbing. Using those numbers, the panel set targets for the amount of carbon reduction necessary to slow, and ultimately reverse, potentially devastating planetary warming.

But these new numbers suggest those targets may have to be revised upward by 25 percent. Research by the study’s lead author, Princeton professor Laure Resplandy, indicates our oceans are absorbing about 60 percent more heat energy than previously estimated.

According to Resplandy, the world’s oceans have taken up more than 13 zettajoules of energy every year between 1991 and 2016. A joule is the standard unit of energy; a zettajoule is one joule, followed by 21 zeroes.

Oceans, arctic
FILE – A young polar bear walks on ice over deep waters of the Arctic Ocean. VOA

“Imagine if the ocean was only 30 feet deep,” Resplandy said. “Our data show that it would have warmed by 6.5 degrees Celsius every decade since 1991. In comparison, the estimate of the last IPCC assessment report would correspond to a warming of only 4 degrees Celsius every decade.”

How they got the new numbers

It’s not that the old numbers were wrong; it’s that the new numbers relied on new techniques and new ways to measure ocean warming. The old techniques used spot measurements of ocean temperature. But Resplandy and her team measured the amount of oxygen and carbon in the air, a number they call “Atmospheric Oxygen Potential (APO).” As oceans warm, they release oxygen and carbon into the atmosphere, which increases APO.

Another factor that raises APO is the burning of fossil fuels. Resplandy and her team compared the expected rise in APO due to the burning of fossil fuels, and compared it to the actual APO they were seeing. By looking at the difference, the team was able to predict how much carbon and oxygen were being released by the oceans and, therefore, how warm the world’s oceans were getting.

climate, global warming, celsisu, oceansac
A fisherman stands on his boat as he fishes at the Tisma lagoon wetland park, also designated as Ramsar Site 1141 in the Convention on Wetlands, in Tisma, Nicaragua. VOA

Why the new numbers matter

A host of countries, including the U.S. and China, signed the Paris Climate Accord in 2015, which aims to keep average global temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. Many climate scientists predict that if temperatures go above that mark, humans will be faced with devastating long-term global affects. Keeping those temperatures down requires cutting the amount of greenhouse gases pumped into the atmosphere.

Also Read: New Carbon Capture Technology Now Able To Fight Climate Change: Experts

The U.S. has since pulled out of that climate agreement, but most of the rest of the world remains focused on limiting the rise of the world’s average temperatures.

This new research suggests that accomplishing that goal requires countries to pull 25 percent more carbon out of the atmosphere than they’ve already committed to cleaning up. (VOA)