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Savya Jain derive inspiration from the bountiful nature. Unsplash

With humans locked-in their homes over the past few months, what ran free were nature’s brushstrokes – deepening the sky’s blue, the trees’ green and all the colours in between. Capturing nature’s refreshed aura on canvas, ten on-view abstract artistic impressions by Delhi-based artist Savya Jain derive inspiration from idyllic and bountiful nature.

“When I travel, I bring back with me one memory which I have to paint. The colours, the smells, the weather, the emotions that I feel at that time become the centre of my canvas,” Savya Jain told IANSlife. The abstract artist uses memories from her travels to render unique fluid art. In her current collection titled ‘Nature in lockdown times’, her signature style blends effortlessly with the natural leitmotifs and hues we fondly associate with nature’s many moods, to create a diverse art experience.


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In her own words, a direct view of her garden from her studio is just inspiration landing straight in her backyard. “I’ve witnessed the changing seasons; from bright sunny mornings, to the heavy downpour during monsoon season.”


The colours, the smells, the weather, the emotions that I feel at that time become the centre of my canvas,” says Savya Jain. IANS

“When I was much younger, the natural beauty I was surrounded by used to scare me because of its grandeur and unpredictable nature. However, as I grew up, I started to find comfort in them. Now I cannot go a day without hearing the constant sound of birds chirping, cycling around the house, identifying new plants and trees with my dad, or just sitting in the garden with a cup of coffee; the list is endless. I have just been constantly inspired by the different aspects of nature that motivated me to create artworks inspired by it,” she says about nature’s link with her art.

Want to read more in Hindi? Check out: ‘बॉलीवुड में ड्रग के गढ़ को उखाड़ने’ में मदद कर सकता है शोविक’

The young artist’s paintings speak of views from her own garden to the far-flung landscapes of Arunachal Pradesh and Andaman and Nicobar Islands, and even Spain’s Barcelona. The paintings in Savya’s nature series carry vignettes of places she visited, painted during a time when travelling faces an unprecedented halt.

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An artwork, titled ‘Grounded’ blends the colour palate of earthy terrain and the pleasant seaside. Inspired by Ram Kumar’s, Untitled 1898, it is an abstract painting of a landscape for which Ram Kumar was known. As Savya notes herself, the light blue merges very well with the stark brown, just like the way we see the ocean merging with the ground.

The solo show titled ‘Nature in lockdown times’ will be exhibited both online, on her Instagram handle @savyajainart, and offline at Chandra Gardens, Rajokri, New Delhi from September 4-25. (IANS)


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Photo by Rob Pumphrey on Unsplash

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Basil scientifically called Ocimum basilicum, and also known as great basil, is a culinary herb from the Lamiaceae (mints) family. A common aromatic herb, it is usually used to add flavor to a variety of recipes, but what may astonish one is that there are various health benefits of basil that make it well-known for its immunity-enhancing properties.

Basil seeds or basil essential oil are proven to help prevent a wide range of health conditions, which makes it one of the most essential medical herbs known today. Basil has vitamin A, C, E, K, and Omega 3 components including cooling components too. It also contains minerals like Copper, Calcium, Manganese, Phosphorus, Zinc, and Potassium. An ancient Ayurvedic herb, basil has various proven benefits including being anti-inflammatory, ant-oxidant, immune-booster, pain-reducer, and blood vessel-protector.

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This herb also contains cooling components thus making it really helpful for summers. It detoxifies the body and maintains one's body temperature pace. Adding to the benefits Basil contains antioxidant-rich volatile essential oils, which are considered hydrophobic, meaning they don't dissolve in water and are light and small enough to travel through the air and the pores within our skin. Basil's volatile essential oil is something that gives the herb its distinct smell and taste, but basil contains some great healing properties.

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The researchers showed that pregnant mice who did not have this subset of cells were twice as likely to miscarry, and in many of these pregnancies fetal growth was severely restricted.

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"When you're pregnant, the immune system is seeing the placenta for the first time in decades -- not since the mother made a placenta when she herself was a fetus," said Eva Gillis-Buck, from UCSF.

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