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SC refuses to stay killing of stray dogs in Kerala

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New Delhi:  Disapproving the mass killing of stray dogs by the Thiruvananthapuram civic body, the Supreme Court , however refused to stay it and said the killing of the dangerous dogs and those inflicted with rabies should be guided by rules.

Declining to pass an interim order putting on hold the killing by Thiruvananthapuram Municipal Corporation (MCT), a bench of Justice Dipak Misra and Justice PC Pant said that the killing of the stray dogs should be guided by the Animal Birth Control (Dogs) Rules, 2001.

“These rules have not been declared unconstitutional. If rules are there, then they have to be followed” and any killing of dogs has to done according to the rules, said the bench as senior counsel appearing for the Kerala government said that the State high court has held that the rules go beyond the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960.

The court directed the listing of all the related matter for hearing on November 18, as advocate Archana Sharma told the court that apex court has already stayed the operation of similar orders by the three high courts including by Karnataka and Himachal Pradesh High Courts.

Urging the court to stay the order, PIL petitioner Anupam Tripathi said that the Kerala home minister has justified the killings of the stray dogs saying that there was nothing wrong in it, and that no action should be taken against the killers of the dogs.

Senior counsel Dushyant Dave who is amicus curiae in the matter told the court that two-wheeler riders are the worst sufferers and “I have seen people falling” when they are chased by the street dogs.

Pointing to the cases where new born children were taken away by stray dogs, Dave told the court a person bitten by a stray dogs has to take three injections and they are so expensive that they are beyond the reach of a common man.

The apex court had on October 9 sought the response from the central and Kerala governments on the plea seeking immediate halt to the killing of street dogs by the MCT.

The culling was being carried out in Kerala following an all-party meeting in July where it was decided eliminate more than 2.5 lakh street dogs.

(IANS)

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Study Shows That Dogs Born in Summers Are More Likely to Suffer From Heart Disease

Owing to higher level of outdoor air pollution during summers, dogs born during this time are more likely to be at higher risk of heart disease, according to a study.

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hormone oxytocin
Dog's hormone oxytocin sensitivity study. Pixabay

Owing to higher level of outdoor air pollution during summers, dogs born during this time are more likely to be at higher risk of heart disease, according to a study.

For both dogs and humans, outside air pollution during pregnancy and at the time of birth appears to play a role in later development of heart disease.

 

Man's best friend
Dogs are among the most popular domestic animals. Wikimedia

 

Overall, dogs have a 0.3 to 2 per cent risk of developing heart disease depending on breed, but among those that are genetically predisposed to the heart disease, the birth month difference in risk was found to be marginal.

However, breeds not genetically predisposed to the disease, such as Norfolk terrier, Berger Picard, American Staffordshire terrier, English toy spaniel, Bouvier des flandres, Border terrier and Havanese were also found to be at highest risk.

This suggests that the effect supports an environmental mechanism, the researchers said, in a paper published in the journal Scientific Reports.

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, also supports earlier findings in humans pointing to the role of early gestational exposure to fine air particulates and increased risk of heart disease later in life.

 

People raised in cities without pets at risk from mental illness
People raised in cities without pets at risk from mental illness. Pixabay

“It’s important to study dogs because the canine heart is a remarkably similar model to the human cardiovascular system,” said Mary Regina Boland, Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania in the US.

“Also, humans and dogs share their lives together and are exposed to similar environmental effects, so seeing this birth season-cardiovascular disease relationship in both species illuminates mechanisms behind this birth-season disease relationship,” Boland added.

Because dogs’ pregnancies are shorter than humans (lasting only 2 months), pollution as a possible mechanism is still thought to be through the mother’s inhalation of air pollution effecting the uterine environment, which in turn affects the developing cardiovascular system of the baby or puppy, the study showed.

For the new study, the team examined 129,778 canines encompassing 253 different breeds.

Also Read: Study Shows, Dogs of 8 Weeks of Age are Found Most Attractive by Humans

The research team found that risk climbs to the greatest level in dogs born in July, who have a 74 per cent greater risk of heart disease than would typically be expected. (IANS)

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