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SC seeks details on trafficked women and children

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Newsgram Staff Writer

New Delhi: The Supreme Court, on Tuesday,  asked all state governments to yield details of all the cases filed under the Immoral Traffic (Prevention) Act, 1956 (ITP Act) and the Indian Penal Code(IPC) till September 30, 2015 to the central government.

“States shall give complete details with regard to the cases filed under the Immoral Traffic (Prevention) Act, 1956 and under sections 370 and 370A of Indian Penal Code during 2014 and till September 30, 2015,” said judges Anil R Dave, Madan B Lokur and Kurian Joseph.

While Section 370 of the IPC has provision for punishment for buying or disposing of any person as a slave provision for punishment for exploitation of trafficked persons is included under Section 370A.

The court assured that the details would be made available within a fortnight so that the union of India can collect the data and put it in a proper format for perusal of this court.

The court said the information would be submitted to the court before November 16. It directed the next hearing on the rescue and rehabilitation of the trafficked people to be held on November 19.

The court asked the Cabinet Secretary to take steps for setting up a committee comprising relevant ministries and departments, states and union territories to prepare a comprehensive legislation to tackle all aspects of trafficking.

The government told the court that there was an urgent need for setting up an Organised Crime Investigation Agency (OCIA) to deal with human trafficking.

Asking the home ministry to do the needful, the court wanted the know the scope and the feasibility of the proposed OCIA.

The court also asked the central government to provide details about the action taken to curb the trafficking and sexual exploitation against women and children.

(With inputs from IANS)

 

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US: Supreme Court Blocks Administration’s Effort to Add Citizenship Question on Census

The citizenship question was meant to better enforce the Voting Rights Act

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US, Supreme Court, Citizenship
FILE - Demonstrators protest during a Fair Maps rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court, in Washington, U.S., March 26, 2019. VOA

U.S. President Donald Trump responded Thursday to the Supreme Court’s decision to block his administration’s effort to add a citizenship question to the upcoming U.S. census by saying he’d asked his lawyers whether there was a way to delay the nationwide head count.

In a tweet hours after the court announced its decision, Trump said it “seems totally ridiculous” that the government could not question people about their citizenship on the census, which takes place once every 10 years.

The Supreme Court ruled the administration’s explanation — that the citizenship question was meant to better enforce the Voting Rights Act — was “more of a distraction” from the issue than an explanation.

Opponents of the citizenship question say it would intimidate noncitizens into not answering the census, ultimately leaving them underrepresented in Congress.

US, Supreme Court, Citizenship
U.S. President Donald Trump responded Thursday to the Supreme Court’s decision to block his administration’s effort. Pixabay

Chief Justice John Roberts joined the court’s liberal justices in the 5-4 ruling.

 The nation’s highest court also announced Thursday that it was rejecting a request to intervene in states’ redistricting efforts.  Redrawing the boundaries of voting districts is meant to ensure proportional representation in state legislatures as the population grows and changes locations.

Republicans in the state of North Carolina and Democrats in the state of Maryland have been accused of redrawing the lines of voting districts to keep power in the hands of the ruling party.

The chief justices said manipulation of the electoral map, a practice known colloquially as gerrymandering, is a problem for state governments to solve, not the Supreme Court.

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Thursday was the final day of rulings by the Supreme Court before its summer break. (VOA)