Sunday May 27, 2018
Home Science & Technology Scientists de...

Scientists develop device to turn breaths into words

0
//
70
Republish
Reprint

By NewsGram Staff Writer

London: A team of Scientists from London, which includes an Indian doctor, has developed a machine which can help patients with severe paralysis by analyzing and interpreting their breathing patterns.

The prototype analyses changes in breathing patterns and converts ‘breath signals’ into words using pattern recognition software and an analogue-to-digital converter.

A speech synthesizer then reads the words aloud.

turningbreat
credits: bbc

The device can transform the lives of millions of sufferers of severe paralysis and loss of speech, researchers said.
“This device could transform the way people with severe muscular weakness or other speech disorders communicate,” said Atul Gaur, consultant anesthetist at Glenfield Hospital, England.

“In an intensive care setting, the technology has the potential to be used to make an early diagnosis of locked-in syndrome (LIS), by allowing patients, including those on ventilators, to communicate effectively by breathing — an almost effortless act,” Gaur added.

Co-researchers David Kerr and Kaddour Bouazza-Marouf from Loughborough University said the device learns from its user, building up its knowledge as it goes.

It allows the user to control how he or she wishes to communicate “effectively enabling them to create their own language by varying the speed of their breathing”.

(With inputs from IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

A New Tool May Aid Patients To Detect Urine Blockage

Surgeons are developing a new smartphone-based tool that can detect urethral or urine blockage, potentially making it easier for patients to test themselves for the condition from the comfort of their own homes.

0
//
17
Americans have been oberved being online almost everytime.
representational image

Surgeons are developing a new smartphone-based tool that can detect urethral or urine blockage, potentially making it easier for patients to test themselves for the condition from the comfort of their own homes.

The novel technique could take high-speed photography which could capture subtle differences between a normal steady stream of liquid and a stream of liquid with an obstruction.

Urethral strictures are a slowing or blocking of the natural flow of urine due to an injury or infection. It is normally diagnosed by uroflowmetry, a test administered at a physician’s office.

“The problem is that patient follow-up after we treat this condition is very poor,” said Matthew Gretzer, Associate Professor at the University of Arizona in the US.

“But we need patients to come back to our clinic for a uroflow test to determine if the obstruction is still present,” he added.

representational image

In order to test Gretzer’s hypothesis on high-speed photography, the team created a model of a urethral structure using tubing hooked to a saline bag that could drain through.

Saline fluid was passed through the tubing with and without blockages, created using 3D printed strictures, placed within the tubing. High-speed photography captured both the regular and blocked stream of liquid exiting the tube.

Gretzer contended that photos can be a medium to diagnose blockages and he hopes that patients could send him these images to analyse and make the diagnosis. He plans to create a mobile app which can be downloaded by the patients.

“All patients would need to do is take high-speed images of their urine flow using a strobe light,” Gretzer said.

“Strobe light apps are readily available right now for people to use on their phones”.

Also Read: Astronauts from Clemson University in US Believe Human Urine Can Help Safer Space Travel

According to the researchers, as fluid exits an opening, a natural breakpoint occurs where the liquid stream forms droplets, but with obstructions in place, it changes.

The results showed that by analysing photos, they could measure the length to this point of droplet formation. This length then directly related to the presence of an obstruction in the tube. (IANS)

Next Story