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Scientists likely to name new fish after US President Barack Obama to honour his decision to create new protected area of Hawaiian coast

The dorsal fin coloration of the male is a circular red spot ringed with blue which scientists said reminded them of Obama's campaign logo

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WASHINGTON, September 3, 2016: Scientists are set to name a new fish after US President Barack Obama honouring his decision to create a new protected area of the Hawaiian coast.

The National Geographic reported on Friday that the maroon and gold creature, which was discovered 300 ft deep in the waters off Kure Atoll, is the only known fish to live within Papahanaumokuakea, an expanse of coral reefs and seamounts home to more than 7,000 species, CNN reported on Saturday.

Last week, Obama established the largest protected marine sanctuary in the world when he more than quadrupled the size of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument to protect reefs, marine life habitats, and other resources.

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The expansion will add 442,781 sq.miles to the monument, making it now a total of 582,578 sq.miles.

The dorsal fin coloration of the male is a circular red spot ringed with blue which scientists said reminded them of Obama’s campaign logo, CNN reported.

“It’s very reminiscent of Obama’s (campaign) logo,” Richard Pyle, a marine biologist, told the magazine.

“How appropriate that a fish we were thinking about naming after him anyway, just to say thank you for expanding the national monument, happens to have a feature that ties it to the President.”

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 The species was discovered this past June during a research trip to Kure, the world’s northernmost atoll, CNN reported citing the National Geographic.

This is not the first time Obama has had a fish named after him.

Scientists named an aqua and orange speckled freshwater darter found in the Tennessee River Etheostoma Obama in 2012, CNN added. (IANS)

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Here’s how eating fish could be IQ booster for your kid

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Fish acts like an IQ booster. Here's how!
Fish acts like an IQ booster. Here's how! Pixabay

Want to sharpen your kids’ mental skills and boost intelligence quotient (IQ) levels? Fish will act as an IQ booster.

The findings show:

  • Children who eat fish at least once a week sleep better
  • Have IQ scores that are four points higher, on average, than those who consume fish less frequently or not at all.
  • Those whose meals sometimes included fish scored 3.3 points higher.
  • Increased fish consumption was associated with fewer disturbances of sleep, which the researchers say indicates better overall sleep quality.
Other than acting as an IQ booster, fish has many other benefits Pixabay
Other than acting as an IQ booster, fish has many other benefits Pixabay

How it was done

For the study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, a cohort of 541 nine to 11-year-olds in China — 54 per cent boys and 46 per cent girls — completed a questionnaire about how often they consumed fish in the past month.

Their parents then answered questions about sleep quality, which included topics such as sleep duration and frequency of night waking or daytime sleepiness.

Fish has omega-3 which reduces anti-social behavior Pixabay
Fish has omega-3 which reduces anti-social behavior Pixabay

Connected dots

Previous studies showed a relationship between omega-3s, the fatty acids in many types of fish, and improved intelligence, as well as omega-3s and better sleep. But they’ve never all been connected before.

The new study reveals sleep as a possible mediating pathway — the potential missing link between fish and intelligence, the researchers said.

“Lack of sleep is associated with antisocial behaviour, poor cognition is associated with antisocial behaviour,” said Adrian Raine, Professor at the University of Pennsylvania.

“We have found that omega-3 supplements reduce antisocial behaviour, so it’s not too surprising that fish is behind this.”

The study “adds to the growing body of evidence showing that fish consumption has really positive health benefits and should be something more heavily advertised and promoted”, said Jennifer Pinto-Martin, Professor at the varsity. (IANS)