Sunday October 20, 2019
Home Lead Story Scientists Re...

Scientists Reform Face Of Another Human Ancestor

Now, Scientists have come up with a reformed face of a human ancestor

0
//
human, ancestor, scientists, sculpture
This image shows a preliminary portrait of a juvenile female Denisovan based on a skeletal profile reconstructed from ancient DNA methylation maps. IANS

Exactly what our Denisovan relatives who lived 100,000 years ago might have looked like had been anyone’s guess for a simple reason – the entire collection of Denisovan remains includes a pinky bone, three teeth, and a lower jaw. Now, Scientists have come up with a reformed face of a human ancestor.

Now they have got a face. Using genetic data, scientists have now produced reconstructions of these long-lost relatives.

“We provide the first reconstruction of the skeletal anatomy of Denisovans,” said study author Liran Carmel of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel.

“In many ways, Denisovans resembled Neanderthals, but in some traits, they resembled us, and in others they were unique,” Carmel said.

Overall, the researchers identified 56 anatomical features in which Denisovans differed from modern humans and/or Neanderthals, 34 of them in the skull, according to a report published in the journal Cell.

For example, the Denisovan’s skull was probably wider than that of modern humans or Neanderthals. They likely also had a longer dental arch.

Rather than relying on DNA sequences, the researchers extracted anatomical information from gene activity patterns.

human, ancestor, scientists, sculpture
Using genetic data, scientists have now produced reconstructions of these long-lost relatives.
IANS

Those gene activity patterns were inferred based on genome-wide DNA methylation or epigenetic patterns.

To test the method the researchers developed, they first applied it to two species whose anatomy is known: the Neanderthal and the chimpanzee.

They found that roughly 85 per cent of the trait reconstructions were accurate in predicting which traits diverged and in which direction they diverged.

By focusing on consensus predictions and the direction of the change, rather than trying to predict precise measurements, they were able to produce the first reconstructed anatomical profile of the little-understood Denisovan.

ALSO READ: Here’s How A Wearable Device Can Regrow Hair On Bald Head

The evidence suggests that Denisovans likely shared Neanderthal traits such as an elongated face and a wide pelvis.

It also highlighted Denisovan-specific differences, such as an increased dental arch and lateral cranial expansion, the researchers said.

“Studying Denisovan anatomy can teach us about human adaptation, evolutionary constraints, development, gene-environment interactions, and disease dynamics,” Carmel said. (IANS)

Next Story

Scientists Discover Mash-Up of Two Feared Disasters – Hurricanes and Earthquakes

It's a shaking of the sea floor during a hurricane or nor'easter that rumbles like a magnitude 3.5 earthquake

0
Scientists, Disasters, hurricanes
FILE - A 2019 NOAA satellite image shows Hurricane Irene, a category 2 storm with winds up to 100 mph and located about 400 miles southeast of Nassau. A study published Oct. 14, 2019, says scientists have discovered 'stormquakes.' VOA

Scientists have discovered a mash-up of two feared disasters – hurricanes and earthquakes.

They’re calling them “stormquakes.”

It’s a shaking of the sea floor during a hurricane or nor’easter that rumbles like a magnitude 3.5 earthquake. The quakes are fairly common, but they weren’t noticed before because they were considered seismic background noise.

And stormquakes can last for days.

Scientists, Disasters, hurricanes

They’re calling them “stormquakes.” Pixabay

The study’s lead author was Wenyuan Fan, a Florida State University seismologist. Fan says this is more an oddity than something that can hurt you, because no one is standing on the sea floor during a hurricane.

Fan’s team found 14,077 stormquakes between 2006 and 2015.

Also Read- Opioid Settlement Talks Broaden ahead of First Federal Trial over Crisis

The study is in this week’s journal Geophysical Research Letters. (VOA)