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Seafood-Rich Diet May Up Pregnancy Chances and Sexual Intimacy

If you are planning to have a baby then try including seafood to your diet as couples who eat seafood tend to be more sexually active and get pregnant faster than other couples trying to conceive, a new study suggests.

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The image is for representative purpose. Pixabay

If you are planning to have a baby then try including seafood to your diet as couples who eat seafood tend to be more sexually active and get pregnant faster than other couples trying to conceive, a new study suggests.

The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, found that, among the participants, 92 per cent of couples who ate seafood more than twice a week were pregnant at the end of one year, compared to 79 per cent among couples consuming less seafood.

“Our study suggests seafood can have many reproductive benefits, including shorter time to pregnancy and more frequent sexual activity,” said co-author Audrey Gaskins from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston.

“Our study found that couples who consume more than two servings of seafood per week while trying to get pregnant, had a significantly higher frequency of sexual intercourse and shorter time to pregnancy,” Gaskins added.

For the study, the researchers examined 500 couples to determine the relationship between seafood intake and time to pregnancy.

H2B visa holders pick crab meat at GW Hall & Son Seafood in Maryland. The state has 20 licensed crab businesses, employing 500 foreign workers.
GW Hall & Son Seafood in Maryland. VOA

The participants recorded their seafood intake and sexual activity in daily journals.

The association between seafood and faster time to pregnancy was not completely explained by more frequent sexual activity, suggesting other biological factors were at play. These could include effects on semen quality, ovulation or embryo quality, the researcher said.

Seafood is an important source of protein and other nutrients for women who are or may become pregnant, but concerns about mercury have led some women to avoid fish when trying to conceive.

Also Read: Eating Fish Twice a Week Reduces the Risk of Heart Failure

Earlier, a study, published in journal Molecular Autism, found no evidence to support claims that mercury in fish is linked to the development of autism or autistic traits in newborns.

“Our results stress the importance of not only female but also male diet on time to pregnancy and suggest that both partners should be incorporating more seafood into their diets for the maximum fertility benefit,” Gaskins noted. (IANS)

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Rate of Blood Pressure among Pregnant Women Aged 35 and Over in US Increases by More than 75%

Women are having children later than in the 1970s and 1980s - and are experiencing higher rates of hypertension during pregnancy as a result

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Blood Pressure, Pregnant, Women
In the study, published in the journal Hypertension, researchers looked at the pregnancies of more than 151 million women in the US between 1970-2010. Pixabay

Researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have found that the rate of blood pressure (chronic hypertension) among pregnant women aged 35 and over in the US has increased by more than 75 per cent since 1970, according to a new research.

In the study, published in the journal Hypertension, researchers looked at the pregnancies of more than 151 million women in the US between 1970-2010.

“Women are having children later than in the 1970s and 1980s – and are experiencing higher rates of hypertension during pregnancy as a result,” said the study led by author and Indian origin researcher Cande V. Ananth from Rutgers University.

According to the researchers, advanced maternal age was associated with the increase, with the rate of chronic hypertension increasing on an average by six per cent per year, 13 times what it was in 1970.

Blood Pressure, Pregnant, Women
Researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have found that the rate of blood pressure (chronic hypertension) among pregnant women aged 35 and over in the US has increased. Pixabay

Prior research has shown that compared with white women, black women have higher rates of obesity, are more likely to smoke and use drugs and are at greater social disadvantage, all of which may contribute to an increased risk of chronic hypertension.

“The best outcome would be to control hypertension before becoming pregnant by reducing obesity, quitting smoking, adopting an overall healthier lifestyle before and during pregnancy, and treating high blood pressure effectively. For every 1-2 lbs. lost prior to pregnancy, blood pressure is reduced,” Ananth said.

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“Not only do these findings have implications for the health of the women and newborns during pregnancy, they have lasting implications on future risks of cardiovascular and stroke risks in women later in life,” he added. (IANS)