Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Image from www.secc.gov.in

New Delhi: For nearly 75 per cent of the 17.9 crore (nearly 180 million) households in rural India, the monthly income of the highest-earning member is less than Rs.5,000, even as close to 40 per cent are landless and work as manual casual labourers for their daily bread, latest official data reveals.


Image from www.secc.gov.in

This is the finding of the Socio-Economic and Caste Census 2011 for Rural India released Friday which also shows that nearly 25 per cent of the rural households still do not own a phone despite India boasting a telecom subscriber base of around a billion.


Also, among the the fortunate families that actually own land, the dependence on rains for their crops is rather high, with 25 per cent having no access to irrigation, as per the Census released by Finance Minister Arun Jaitley.

Only 8.29 per cent of the rural households reported a member who was drawing more than Rs.10,000 per month, while for 17.18 per cent others the monthly earning was between Rs.5,000 and Rs.10,000 per month.

The latest Census covered all the 640 districts in the country in a paperless manner, using some 640,000 electronic handheld devices. The government on Friday released only the provisional data of the socio-economic Census for rural India.

The Census seeks to provide useful data on households on various aspects of their socio-economic status – housing, land-holding, education, women, the differently able, occupation, possession of assets, and members of scheduled castes and tribes.

In a bid to target government schemes better and ensure they the intended beneficiaries alone, it also provides for automatic exclusion of families on the basis of 14 parameters as also automatic inclusion on the basis of five criteria.

“The progress which households in India have made, who are the ones who have qualitatively moved up in terms of quality of life – a document of these will be an important input for all policy makers, both at the Centre and in the states,” Jaitley said.

“I am sure that with the enormity of the schemes and their reaches that all governments have, this document will form the basis of helping us to target groups to support in terms of policy planning,” the Finance Minister added.

Based on 14 parameters for families — which include criteria such owing a vehicle, possessing a kisan credit card, having a serving government member, drawing an income of Rs.10,000 per month, or owing a refrigerator — only 7.05 crore families (39.39 per cent) stand to be excluded.

Similarly, based on five parameters — households without shelter, those living on alms, manual scavengers, primitive tribals and legally released bonded labourers — 16.50 lakh families are eligible for automatic inclusion.


At the same time, 10.69 crore (over 100 million) of rural families, or 60 per cent, qualify for “deprivation” based on seven criteria — which include those with one room, kuccha walls, no member in 18-59 age group, no literate adult above 25 years and landless households.

Among them, while 21.5 per cent belong to scheduled castes or tribes, 23.5 per cent are without a literate adult above 25 years of age. This apart, 30 per cent are landless households deriving a major part of their income from manual labour.

(IANS)


Popular

wikimedia commons

Children playing ringa ringa roses in an open backyard in England

Great historic events that have shaped the world and changed the outlines of countries are often not recorded in memory, or so we think. Wars made sure to destroy evidence and heritage, and the ones who survived told the tale of what really happened. Folklore, albeit through oral tradition kept alive many such stories, hidden in verse, limericks, and rhymes.

Ringa-ringa-roses, a common playtime rhyme among children across the world, is an example of folklore that has survived for many centuries. It tells the story of the The Great Plague of London which ravaged the city between 1665-1666.

Keep Reading Show less
wikimedia commons

Certain tribes have remained matrilineal, where the decision-making power rests with the eldest female of the family.

In modern times, many social movements aim to bring reform to the society we live in, on the basis of certain existing patterns. Patriarchy is something that many aim to cleanse our cultures of, to usher in the era of social and gender equality. Despite all these so-called movements, in southern India, certain societies that patronise matriarchy have existed since before India's independence. The Nairs and Ezhavas of Kerala, and Bunts and Billavas of Karnataka are matrilineal societies that continue to thrive in a patriarchal country.

Kerala remains separate from the rest of India in many ways. Be it literacy policy, form of government, or cultural practices, this state does not always conform to the ideal that India is known for. Even so with their social structure. Certain tribes have remained matrilineal, where the decision-making power rests with the eldest female of the family.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Medhat Dawoud on Unsplash

It is the world's top tech company in turnover (totaling $274.5 billion in 2020) and its most valuable corporation.

Apple inc. Is an American multinational tech firm specialized in consumer electronics, computer programs, and internet services founded by Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and Ronald Wayne in 1976 to manufacture Wozniak's Apple iComputer. It is the world's top tech company in turnover (totaling $274.5 billion in 2020) and its most valuable corporation. Apple is the fourth-largest PC seller by unit sales and the fourth-largest smartphone manufacturer in the world.

Apple has revealed a slew of new products at a special launch event that has been long-awaited. On the day of the live event, Apple announced the iPad mini, Apple Watch Series 7, iPhone 13 mini, and iPhone 13, as well as the iPhone 13 Pro and iPhone 13 Pro Max.

Keep reading... Show less