Sunday December 8, 2019

Early Self Regulation Skills Help An Individual to Maintain Their Health

On the other hand, children who started the study with good regulation skills were actually more likely to have higher BMIs as preschoolers if their mothers showed high levels of gentle control during clean-up.

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Parent and kid
Early self regulation skills may cut toddlers' obesity risk. Flickr

Parents who teach their toddlers self-regulation skills may help them maintain a healthy weight, finds a study.

The study found that toddlers who had poor self-regulation skills — the ability to control their behaviours and emotions — went on to have lower body mass indexes (BMI), if their mothers engaged with them during playtime and then helped them during clean up.

“If the right parenting can help their kids learn to self-regulate, they can use those skills in many other situations, including eating,” said Cynthia Stifter, professor of human development and psychology, Penn State.

“Good self-regulation may help a child stop themselves from throwing a tantrum, but it may also keep them from eating too much. Building those skills is a process that isn’t going to develop on its own, so that’s where parents can step in,” she added.

Parent and kid
The parent and child were then allowed to free play for five minutes before a researcher signalled it was time to clean up. VOA

The study, published in the International Journal of Obesity, included 108 mothers and their  18-month-old toddlers.

The children were weighed and participated in tasks designed to measure their temperament and regulatory skills.

The mother and child were then allowed to free play for five minutes before a researcher signalled it was time to clean up.

When mothers were more responsive during free play and showed more gentle control during clean-up, their children were more likely to have a lower BMI at 4.5 years of age if that children also had poor regulation skills.

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On the other hand, children who started the study with good regulation skills were actually more likely to have higher BMIs as preschoolers if their mothers showed high levels of gentle control during clean-up. (IANS)

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Generalised Anxiety Disorder During Teenage Can Lead to Harmful Drinking Habits

Using questionnaire and clinical interview data from more than 2,000 participants, researchers found generalised anxiety disorder at age 18 was linked to frequent drinking

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Anxiety
Research has shown that links between mental health problems, such as Anxiety disorders, and alcohol are common and complex. Pixabay

Researchers at the University of Bristol have found evidence of an association between generalised Anxiety disorder at age 18 and harmful drinking three years later.

The study, published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence strengthens the evidence for a relationship between anxiety and later alcohol use as the researchers accounted for other factors such as adolescent smoking and cannabis use, and parental anxiety and alcohol use.

“Helping adolescents to develop positive strategies for coping with anxiety, instead of drinking alcohol, may reduce the risk of future harmful drinking. However, we cannot determine if the relationship is causal, because we used an observational study design,” said Maddy Dyer.

Using questionnaire and clinical interview data from more than 2,000 participants, researchers found generalised anxiety disorder at age 18 was linked to frequent drinking, frequent bingeing, hazardous drinking, and harmful drinking at age 18.

Generalised anxiety disorder continued to be associated with harmful drinking at age 21.

Drinking to cope was also strongly associated with more harmful drinking, but it did not appear to influence associations between anxiety and alcohol use.

Harmful drinking was measured using a special test developed by the World Health Association.

On average, adolescents with anxiety drank at more harmful levels regardless of whether they tended to drink alcohol for coping reasons or not.

Anxiety
Researchers at the University of Bristol have found evidence of an association between generalised Anxiety disorder at age 18 and harmful drinking three years later. Pixabay

“Our own research has shown that links between mental health problems, such as anxiety disorders, and alcohol are common and complex,” said Mark Leyshon, Senior Policy and Research Manager at Alcohol Change UK.

For example, anxiety can be both a result of stopping drinking and a risk factor in beginning to drink too much, as this new study suggests.

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“We need more research to help us better understand the connections between alcohol and mental health, as well as high-quality, accessible, integrated support for substance misuse and mental health issues,” Leyshon added. (IANS)