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Mission to Mars: Send your Name to Mars! Get a NASA boarding Pass for 2018

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Send your Name to Mars
NASA will send your name to Mars with InSight in 2018. Wikimedia.
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United States, October 27: Space has always been a sense of infinite wonder for us. It is something that is mystifying, yet incites our intellectual spirit of curiosity and sense of stimulation. Believe it or not, you can send your name to Mars!

  • While everyone desires to set foot on Mars, NASA has given out an opportunity to at least send your name to Mars.
  • As a part of a mission to Mars, NASA is accepting names from the public to be engraved on minute silicon microchip that’s being sent into space with their latest Mars lander, InSight.

You have until November 1, 2017, to send your name to Mars and submit for the Insight mission. Also note that if you miss out this date, don’t get disheartened for you may send your name to Mars for Exploration Mission-1’s November 2018 launch. You can get your boarding pass now and share with your friends!

In 2014, NASA had sent 1.38 million names on board with Orion’s first test flight.

Send your name to Mars
Send your name to Mars and Download your boarding pass.

There’s also an option to invite friends after you send your name to Mars and earn frequent flier points reflecting your personal participation in NASA’s Mars exploration. You can also check your status with your boarding pass number and find your number in the frequent flier list.

What is the purpose of Mission to Mars?

InSight, for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport, will launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, in May 2018 and land on Mars in Nov 2018. This is the first mission to mars dedicated to analyzing the deep interiors of Mars. It will help in finding the history of all rocky planets of the solar system, including Earth.

Mission to Mars Dates:

  • Spacecraft Launch: May 5, 2018
  • Spacecraft Landing: Nov. 26, 2018
  • Surface operations: 728 days / 708 sols
  • Last date send your name: Nov. 1, 2017
  • To send your name: https://mars.nasa.gov/participate/send-your-name/insight/

-Prepared by Bhavana Rathi of NewsGram. Twitter @tweet_bhavana

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NASA Curiosity Rover Gets its Drilling Groove Back on Mars

It lets Curiosity drill using the force of its robotic arm, a little more like the way a human would drill into a wall at home

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NASA Curiosity Rover Gets its Drilling Groove Back on Mars
NASA Curiosity Rover Gets its Drilling Groove Back on Mars. Pixabay

After a mechanical problem took NASA Mars rover Curiosity’s drill offline in December 2016, it has now successfully tested a new drilling method on the Red Planet, making a 50-millimetre deep hole in a target called “Duluth”, NASA has said.

Engineers working with the Curiosity Mars rover have been hard at work testing a new way for the rover to drill rocks and extract powder from them.

On May 20, that effort produced the first drilled sample on Mars in more than a year, NASA said in a statement on Wednesday.

The new technique, called Feed Extended Drilling, keeps the drill’s bit extended out past two stabiliser posts that were originally used to steady the drill against Martian rocks.

It lets Curiosity drill using the force of its robotic arm, a little more like the way a human would drill into a wall at home.

“The team used tremendous ingenuity to devise a new drilling technique and implement it on another planet,” said Curiosity Deputy Project Manager Steve Lee of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

“Those are two vital inches of innovation from 60 million miles away. We’re thrilled that the result was so successful,” Lee said.

Drilling is a vitally important part of Curiosity’s capabilities to study Mars.

Inside the rover are two laboratories that are able to conduct chemical and mineralogical analyses of rock and soil samples.

The samples are acquired from Gale Crater, which the rover has been exploring since 2012.

“We’ve been developing this new drilling technique for over a year, but our job isn’t done once a sample has been collected on Mars,” said JPL’s Tom Green, a systems engineer who helped develop and test Curiosity’s new drilling method.

Also Read: NASA Probe to ‘Touch’ the Sun Will Carry 1.1 mn Names

“With each new test, we closely examine the data to look for improvements we can make and then head back to our test bed to iterate on the process.”

There’s also the next step to work on — delivering the rock sample from the drill bit to the two laboratories inside the rover.

As soon as this Friday, the Curiosity team will test a new process for delivering samples into the rover’s laboratories, NASA said. (IANS)

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