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Mission to Mars: Send your Name to Mars! Get a NASA boarding Pass for 2018

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Send your Name to Mars
NASA will send your name to Mars with InSight in 2018. Wikimedia.

United States, October 27: Space has always been a sense of infinite wonder for us. It is something that is mystifying, yet incites our intellectual spirit of curiosity and sense of stimulation. Believe it or not, you can send your name to Mars!

  • While everyone desires to set foot on Mars, NASA has given out an opportunity to at least send your name to Mars.
  • As a part of a mission to Mars, NASA is accepting names from the public to be engraved on minute silicon microchip that’s being sent into space with their latest Mars lander, InSight.

You have until November 1, 2017, to send your name to Mars and submit for the Insight mission. Also note that if you miss out this date, don’t get disheartened for you may send your name to Mars for Exploration Mission-1’s November 2018 launch. You can get your boarding pass now and share with your friends!

In 2014, NASA had sent 1.38 million names on board with Orion’s first test flight.

Send your name to Mars
Send your name to Mars and Download your boarding pass.

There’s also an option to invite friends after you send your name to Mars and earn frequent flier points reflecting your personal participation in NASA’s Mars exploration. You can also check your status with your boarding pass number and find your number in the frequent flier list.

What is the purpose of Mission to Mars?

InSight, for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport, will launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, in May 2018 and land on Mars in Nov 2018. This is the first mission to mars dedicated to analyzing the deep interiors of Mars. It will help in finding the history of all rocky planets of the solar system, including Earth.

Mission to Mars Dates:

  • Spacecraft Launch: May 5, 2018
  • Spacecraft Landing: Nov. 26, 2018
  • Surface operations: 728 days / 708 sols
  • Last date send your name: Nov. 1, 2017
  • To send your name: https://mars.nasa.gov/participate/send-your-name/insight/

-Prepared by Bhavana Rathi of NewsGram. Twitter @tweet_bhavana

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“It Is A More Rugged Surface Than We Predicted,” NASA’s Plan to Scoop Up Dirt from Asteroid Hits Complication

A Japanese spacecraft, Hayabusa2, touched down on another asteroid in February, also on a mission to collect material. Japan managed to return some tiny particles in 2010 from its first asteroid mission.

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NASA
This artist's rendering made available by NASA in July 2016 shows the mapping of the near-Earth asteroid Bennu by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft. VOA

NASA’s plan to scoop up dirt and gravel from an asteroid has hit a snag, but scientists say they can overcome it.

The asteroid Bennu was thought to have wide, open areas suitable for the task. But a recently arrived spacecraft revealed the asteroid is covered with boulders and there don’t seem to be any big, flat spots that could be used to grab samples.

In a paper released Tuesday by the journal Nature, scientists say they plan to take a closer look at a few smaller areas that might work. They said sampling from those spots poses “a substantial challenge.”

“But I am confident this team is up to that substantial challenge,” the project’s lead scientist, Dante Lauretta, told reporters at a news conference Tuesday.

The spacecraft, called Osiris-Rex, is scheduled to descend close to the surface in the summer of 2020. It will extend a robot arm to pick up the sample, which will be returned to Earth in 2023. The spacecraft began orbiting Bennu at the end of last year, after spending two years chasing down the space rock.

FILE - This Nov. 16, 2018, image provide by NASA shows the asteroid Bennu.
This Nov. 16, 2018, image provide by NASA shows the asteroid Bennu. VOA

When the mission was planned, scientists were aiming to take dirt and gravel from an area measuring at least 55 yards (50 meters) in diameter that was free of boulders or steep slopes, which would pose a hazard.

“It is a more rugged surface than we predicted,” said Lauretta, of the University of Arizona in Tucson and one of the paper’s authors. But he said he believed a sample could still be collected.

NASA project manager Rich Burns said a spot will be chosen this summer and the setback won’t delay the sampling.

Patrick Taylor, who studies asteroids at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston but didn’t participate in the spacecraft mission, noted in a telephone interview that the spacecraft was evidently maneuvering more accurately and precisely than had been expected.

“That gives me confidence they will be able to attempt a sample acquisition,” he said.

NASA
NASA project manager Rich Burns said a spot will be chosen this summer and the setback won’t delay the sampling. VOA

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Bennu is 70 million miles (110 million kilometers) from Earth. It’s estimated to be just over 1,600 feet (500 meters) across and is the smallest celestial body ever orbited by a spacecraft.

A Japanese spacecraft, Hayabusa2, touched down on another asteroid in February, also on a mission to collect material. Japan managed to return some tiny particles in 2010 from its first asteroid mission. (VOA)