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Send Your own Nudes to Facebook to Stop Revenge Porn

Facebook is testing a new method to stop revenge porn that requires you to send your own nudes to yourself via the social network's Messenger app

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Send your own nudes
Send your own nudes via messenger app to yourself.Pixabay.

Sydney, Nov 9: Facebook is testing a new method to stop revenge porn that requires you to send your own nudes to yourself via the social network’s Messenger app.

This strategy would help Facebook to create a digital fingerprint for the picture and mark it as non-consensual explicit media.

So if a relationship goes sour, you could take proactive steps to prevent any intimate images in possession of your former love interest from being shared widely on Facebook or instagram.

Facebook is partnering with a Australian government agency to prevent such image-based abuses, the Australia Broadcasting Corp reported.

If you’re worried your intimate photos will end up on Instagram or Facebook, you can get in contact with Australi’s e-Safety Commissioner. They might then tell you to send your own nudes to yourself on Messenger.

send your own nudes to yourself
Facebook is coming up with a method to prevent revenge porn if you send your own nudes to yourself. Pixabay.

“It would be like sending yourself your image in email, but obviously this is a much safer, secure end-to-end way of sending the image without sending it through the ether,” e-Safety Commissioner Julie Inman Grant told ABC.

Once the image is sent via Messenger, Facebook would use technology to “hash” it, which means creating a digital fingerprint or link.

“They’re not storing the image, they’re storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies,” Grant said.

“So if somebody tried to upload that same image, which would have the same digital footprint or hash value, it will be prevented from being uploaded,” she explained.

Australia is one of four countries taking part in the “industry-first” pilot which uses “cutting-edge technology” to prevent the re-sharing on images on its platforms, Facebook’s Head of Global Safety Antigone Davis was quoted as saying.

“The safety and wellbeing of the Facebook community is our top priority,” Davis said. (IANS)

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YouTube Wants US Government to Clarify Child Privacy Law

Earlier in September, the tech giant was slapped with a hefty $170 million fine post which it planned sweeping changes to kids videos

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YouTube
YouTube announced big changes to how it treats kids videos after the US FTC hit it with new rules and a record penalty to settle a probe into the privacy of children's data on the video platform. Pixabay

Google-owned YouTube wants the US government to clarify how much its video service is subject to child privacy law.

The video-sharing platform has submitted new comments to the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC), asking the agency to loosen some of the restrictions on videos directed at kids.

“Currently, the FTC’s guidance requires platforms must treat anyone watching primarily child-directed content as children under 13. This does not match what we see on YouTube, where adults watch favourite cartoons from their childhood or teachers look for content to share with their students,” the tech giant recently wrote in a blog post.

Earlier in September, the tech giant was slapped with a hefty $170 million fine post which it planned sweeping changes to kids videos.

Since then, many creators have expressed concern about the complexity of Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), their ability to comply with it, and its effect on the viability of their businesses.

YouTube
Google-owned YouTube wants the US government to clarify how much its video service is subject to child privacy law. Pixabay

“Questions range from what content is directed at children, to how to treat adults who might be watching kids content. This is particularly difficult for smaller creators who might not have access to legal resources. Balanced and clear guidelines will help creators better comply with COPPA and live up to their legal obligations, while enabling them to continue producing high-quality kids content that is accessible to everyone, everywhere,” the firm added.

ALSO READ: People Who Find Meaning in Their Lives Are Healthier and Happier: Study

YouTube announced big changes to how it treats kids videos after the US FTC hit it with new rules and a record penalty to settle a probe into the privacy of children’s data on the video platform.

It was the biggest penalty ever levied for violations of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, or COPPA. (IANS)