Tuesday April 24, 2018

Severe Symptoms Of Menopause Might Soar The Risk Of Heart Diseases In Women

A few severe symptoms of Menopause might possibly increase the risk of Heart diseases

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Many menopausal symptoms that you may aren't aware of can cause much harm to you.
Menopause symptoms that may surprise you
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Menopause ,associated with frequent and severe symptoms such as sleep disturbance, hot flashes and depression, may increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women, a study says.

The study found that menopause transition is marked with a number of adverse health effects in women,including hot flashes and depression to vascular aging, which is typically seen as artery stiffening and endothelial dysfunction.

In this study, the frequency, but not severity, of hot flashes was specifically associated with greater arterial stiffening and reduced endothelial function.

You must always be aware of the some severe symptoms of Menopause that may harm you adversely.
The symptoms of Menopause that you must be aware of.

“Perimenopausal and early menopausal women are more vulnerable to increased risk of cardiovascular disease,” said JoAnn Pinkerton, executive director at the North American Menopause Society in the US.

“With fluctuating and then declining estrogen during the menopause transition, it is important to monitor mood, blood pressure, lipids, blood sugars, and body composition because of the increased risk of abdominal fat.

“Healthy eating and exercise are encouraged, with individualised discussion about benefits and risks of hormone therapy,” Pinkerton added.

Also Read: Sleep problems in Menopause linked to hot flashes, depression

For the findings, published in the journal Menopause, the team examined 138 menopausal women for the association of mood, symptoms, and quality of life measures with the key markers of vascular aging, a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease.

In addition, across the stages of menopause, arterial stiffening and vascular dysfunction were associated with more frequent and severe menopause symptoms and a lower quality of life.

No association, however, was found with depressive symptoms.  IANS

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Sleep problems in menopause linked to hot flashes, depression

The women provided annual surveys and blood samples so that the researchers could track sleep disruptions, other menopausal symptoms and hormone levels

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To track poor sleep, the surveys asked questions about the frequency of insomnia, restless sleep and sleep disturbances.
Falling asleep is directly related to salary of a person. Wikimedia Commons

A study of middle-aged women by the University of Illinois (UI) found that sleep problems vary across the stages of menopause, yet are consistently correlated with hot flashes and depression.

The UI researchers used data from the Midlife Women’s Health Study, which followed 776 women aged 45-54 in the greater Baltimore area for up to seven years.

The women provided annual surveys and blood samples so that the researchers could track sleep disruptions, other menopausal symptoms and hormone levels as women transitioned from pre- to post-menopause, Xinhua reported.

Also Read: Common BP Drug May Prevent Onset Of Type 1 Diabetes

To track poor sleep, the surveys asked questions about the frequency of insomnia, restless sleep and sleep disturbances.

The study found no correlation between the likelihood of reporting poor sleep before menopause, during menopause and after menopause.

Depression and hot flashes are two risk factors vary in reported frequency across menopausal stages.
Depression and hot flashes are two risk factors vary in reported frequency across menopausal stages. Wikimedia Commons

This means that for many women in the study, their reported sleep problems changed as they transitioned to different stages of menopause. In other words, women who had insomnia during menopause were not more likely to have insomnia after menopause.

In analyzing the surveys for any other symptoms or factors that might be associated with poor sleep, the researchers found that hot flashes and depression were strongly correlated with poor sleep across all stages of menopause.

Those two risk factors vary in reported frequency across menopausal stages, which might help explain why poor sleep also varies across the stages, the researchers said.

Also Read: Tiny Pacemakers Could Be Game Changers for Heart Patients

The findings suggest that addressing those risk factors may also address sleep disruptions, as well as give women hope that their sleep symptoms may not last past the menopausal transition, said Rebecca Smith, a UI professor of pathobiology.

Smith conducted the study with Jodi Flaws and Megan Mahoney, professors of comparative biosciences at Illinois.

The study has been published in the journal Sleep Medicine. (IANS)

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