Thursday November 22, 2018

Severe Symptoms Of Menopause Might Soar The Risk Of Heart Diseases In Women

A few severe symptoms of Menopause might possibly increase the risk of Heart diseases

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Many menopausal symptoms that you may aren't aware of can cause much harm to you.
Menopause symptoms that may surprise you
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Menopause ,associated with frequent and severe symptoms such as sleep disturbance, hot flashes and depression, may increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women, a study says.

The study found that menopause transition is marked with a number of adverse health effects in women,including hot flashes and depression to vascular aging, which is typically seen as artery stiffening and endothelial dysfunction.

In this study, the frequency, but not severity, of hot flashes was specifically associated with greater arterial stiffening and reduced endothelial function.

You must always be aware of the some severe symptoms of Menopause that may harm you adversely.
The symptoms of Menopause that you must be aware of.

“Perimenopausal and early menopausal women are more vulnerable to increased risk of cardiovascular disease,” said JoAnn Pinkerton, executive director at the North American Menopause Society in the US.

“With fluctuating and then declining estrogen during the menopause transition, it is important to monitor mood, blood pressure, lipids, blood sugars, and body composition because of the increased risk of abdominal fat.

“Healthy eating and exercise are encouraged, with individualised discussion about benefits and risks of hormone therapy,” Pinkerton added.

Also Read: Sleep problems in Menopause linked to hot flashes, depression

For the findings, published in the journal Menopause, the team examined 138 menopausal women for the association of mood, symptoms, and quality of life measures with the key markers of vascular aging, a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease.

In addition, across the stages of menopause, arterial stiffening and vascular dysfunction were associated with more frequent and severe menopause symptoms and a lower quality of life.

No association, however, was found with depressive symptoms.  IANS

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Meal Rich in Calories Increases Risk of Diabetes

The results will be presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018 in Chicago

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The researchers found that women with diabetes were 27 per cent more likely to develop cancer than women without diabetes but for men the risk was 19 per cent higher.
High calorie meal for dinner may up heart disease, diabetes risk. Pixabay

Eating a meal rich in calories for dinner can increase the risk of diabetes as well as lead to poorer cardiovascular health, researchers have warned.

The findings showed that eating the majority of a person’s daily calories in the evening, post 6 p.m. may lead to an increased risk of developing pre-diabetes and high blood pressure, which can lead to diabetes and affect the heart.

Every one per cent increase in the number of calories eaten after 6 p.m. — about 20 calories in a 2,000-calorie daily diet — was associated with higher fasting glucose, insulin and insulin resistance, all of which are associated with an increased risk of diabetes.

Eating 30 per cent or more of a day’s calories after 6 p.m. was associated with a 23 per cent higher risk of developing high blood pressure and a 19 per cent higher risk of becoming pre-diabetic.

“There is increasing evidence that when we eat is important, in addition to what we eat and how much we eat,” said lead author Nour Makarem, a postdoctoral student at the Columbia University in New York.

“In our study we show that if you eat most of your calories before 6 p.m., you may have better cardiovascular health.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“Your meal timing matters and eating earlier in the day may be an important strategy to help lower the risk for heart disease,” Makarem said.

However, night-time eating was not associated with being overweight and obese or having central adiposity (fat).

For the study, the team analysed the meal timing of 12,708 participants, aged 18 to 76, from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

Also Read- Exposure to Lead, Mercury Increases Cholesterol Levels

More than half of the study participants (56.6 per cent) reported consuming more than 30 per cent of their food intake after 6 p.m.

The results will be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2018 in Chicago. (IANS)