Saturday September 22, 2018

Severe Symptoms Of Menopause Might Soar The Risk Of Heart Diseases In Women

A few severe symptoms of Menopause might possibly increase the risk of Heart diseases

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Many menopausal symptoms that you may aren't aware of can cause much harm to you.
Menopause symptoms that may surprise you
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Menopause ,associated with frequent and severe symptoms such as sleep disturbance, hot flashes and depression, may increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women, a study says.

The study found that menopause transition is marked with a number of adverse health effects in women,including hot flashes and depression to vascular aging, which is typically seen as artery stiffening and endothelial dysfunction.

In this study, the frequency, but not severity, of hot flashes was specifically associated with greater arterial stiffening and reduced endothelial function.

You must always be aware of the some severe symptoms of Menopause that may harm you adversely.
The symptoms of Menopause that you must be aware of.

“Perimenopausal and early menopausal women are more vulnerable to increased risk of cardiovascular disease,” said JoAnn Pinkerton, executive director at the North American Menopause Society in the US.

“With fluctuating and then declining estrogen during the menopause transition, it is important to monitor mood, blood pressure, lipids, blood sugars, and body composition because of the increased risk of abdominal fat.

“Healthy eating and exercise are encouraged, with individualised discussion about benefits and risks of hormone therapy,” Pinkerton added.

Also Read: Sleep problems in Menopause linked to hot flashes, depression

For the findings, published in the journal Menopause, the team examined 138 menopausal women for the association of mood, symptoms, and quality of life measures with the key markers of vascular aging, a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease.

In addition, across the stages of menopause, arterial stiffening and vascular dysfunction were associated with more frequent and severe menopause symptoms and a lower quality of life.

No association, however, was found with depressive symptoms.  IANS

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Exposure to Arsenic, Lead May Spike up Risk of Heart Disease

Since metals are associated with cardiovascular disease even at relatively low levels of exposure, "population-wide strategies to minimise exposure will further contribute to overall cardiovascular prevention efforts," the researchers concluded

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Heart Disease
Even low exposure to arsenic, lead may up heart disease risk. Pixabay

Even low levels of exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment like arsenic, lead, copper and cadmium pose a significant risk to cardiovascular health, finds a study, led by one of an Indian-origin.

Although often naturally occurring, these contaminants have made their way into water supplies and, via irrigation, into the food chain.

Concern has often focused on the toxicity or carcinogenic properties of the metals, particularly at high doses.

However, the findings, published by The BMJ, showed there is increasing evidence to suggest that heavy metals may have other adverse effects on health – including cardiovascular disease such as heart disease and stroke – even at lower levels of exposure, the researchers said.

“It’s clear from our analysis that there’s a possible link between exposure to heavy metals or metalloids and risk of conditions such as heart disease, even at low doses – and the greater the exposure, the greater the risk,” said lead author Rajiv Chowdhury, from Britain’s University of Cambridge.

Heart Disease
Concern has often focused on the toxicity or carcinogenic properties of the metals, particularly at high doses. Pixabay

“While people shouldn’t be overly worried about any immediate health risk, it should send a message to policymakers that we need to take action to reduce people’s exposure.”

The study “reinforces the (often under-recognised) importance of environmental toxic metals in enhancing global cardiovascular risk, beyond the roles of conventional behavioural risk factors, such as smoking, poor diet and inactivity,” the researchers said.

For the study, the team conducted a meta-analysis of 37 studies involving almost 350,000 participants.

Also Read- Honor Launches its Budget Smartphone Honor 7S in India

Chowdhury noted that the study highlighted the potential need for additional worldwide efforts and strategies “to reduce human exposures even in settings where there is a relatively lower average level of exposure.”

Since metals are associated with cardiovascular disease even at relatively low levels of exposure, “population-wide strategies to minimise exposure will further contribute to overall cardiovascular prevention efforts,” the researchers concluded. (IANS)