Sunday February 17, 2019

Here is Why Shaolin Star Keerthi Prasad B S is an Inspiration to All!

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Keerthi Prasad B S
Wushu is a collective knowledge of all traditional Chinese martial arts. Wikimedia
  • Keerthi Prasad B S was inspired to practice the Shaolin art after realizing the connection between India and the traditions of the Shaolin Temple
  • Having completed his pre-university education, he left for China to pursue his passion
  • In an alien country, Keerthi struggled with basic issues to emerge as a Shaolin star

July 09, 2017: Keerthi Prasad B S’ passion was fueled after watching a documentary of the Shaolin Temple. When he began studying about it on the internet, his interest in the area reached its peak. Keerthi realized the Indian connection with Shaolin Temple.

“The Shaolin Temple was built by an emperor to accommodate Indian master Buddhabadhra’s preachings, who was the first abbot of Shaolin. Later, another Indian Monk, Bodhidharma, arrived at the temple and initiated the Chinese Chan tradition.”

In love with the Shaolin temple, Keerthi decided to go for it. After the completion of his pre-university education, he expressed to his father the decision to learn Shaolin. He saved money by working as a medical transcriptionist and by doing some freelance photography.

The journey began when Keerthi Prasad earned himself a student visa to Shaolin Cultural Centre in Dengfeng, which is the most common destination for international aspirants interested in the martial arts, mentioned Indian Express report.

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He notes how upon reaching the alien country, issues like language, food, training, and being far away from the family was a rough start, but Keerthi knew it was mind over body. Keerthi trained under the Shaolin Monks Reserve Force and rightfully earned himself 7th Duan Wei Certification. The strenuous training was worth for mastering of Wushu (a collective of Chinese traditional martial arts).

Today, Keerthi Prasad B S is the only individual in South India who has an authentic certification from Shaolin. The 34-year-old runs a Shaolin Wushu Cultural Centre in Bengaluru. The centre has 120 students from the age of 4 till 60 who come to learn from the very best, who is the 34th generation disciple of Shaolin Temple Abbot Shi Yong Xin.

– prepared by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394

Next Story

Research Finds US Power and Influence as a Greater Threat than Russia and China

The list of countries most likely to view the U.S. as a threat is topped by two key allies in the Asia-Pacific: South Korea and Japan.

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US, Donald Trump
"The President is once again delivering on his promise to build the wall, protect the border, and secure our great country," White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said. VOA

More people around the world worry about the threat posed by the United States’ use of power and influence than they do about similar threats from Russia or China.

The finding, part of Pew Research Center’s Spring 2018 Global Attitudes Survey, found a median of 45 percent of more than 27,000 respondents in 26 countries view U.S. power and influence as a threat, compared to 37 percent for Russia and 35 percent for China.

The list of countries most likely to view the U.S. as a threat is topped by two key allies in the Asia-Pacific: South Korea and Japan.

Donald Trump, North Korea
FILE – A man reads a newspaper reporting on the summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, at a newspaper stand in Seoul, South Korea, June 12, 2018. VOA

In South Korea, 67 percent of respondents listed the U.S. as a threat. In Japan, it was 66 percent.

Mexico was third, with 64 percent of respondents calling U.S. power and influence a major threat. Previous Pew surveys found views of the U.S. in Mexico nose-dived following the election of U.S. President Donald Trump in 2016.

Data published by Pew in October 2018 found 6 percent of Mexicans expressed confidence in Trump’s leadership, due in part to strong opposition to his plans to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico.

In another four countries — Tunisia, Argentina, Brazil and Indonesia — more than half of the respondents viewed U.S. power and influence as a threat.

And 49 percent of respondents in France and Germany saw the U.S. as a threat.

Pew researchers call the increased wariness of the U.S. the biggest change in sentiment of all the threats tracked by the survey.

In 2013, about 25 percent of survey respondents from 22 countries saw U.S. power and influence as a threat. But by 2017, following Trump’s election, that had risen to 38 percent.

U.S. security policy under Trump has emphasized what officials have described as a new era of great power competition, labeling Russia and China top threats to the U.S. and the world.

Donald Trump, South Korea
In South Korea, 67 percent of respondents listed the U.S. as a threat. Pixabay

During his first day on the job, acting U.S. Defense Secretary Pat Shanahan said his top concern was, “China, China, China.”

But based on the results of the survey, many people around the world are not convinced.

Poland was the only country where more than half of the respondents saw Russian influence and power a major threat.

Respondents seem to be more worried about China, though only in four countries did more than half of the respondents see China as a danger.

A median of 82 percent of South Koreans surveyed viewed Chinese influence and power as a major threat, followed by 69 percent in Japan, 56 percent in the Philippines, and 51 percent in Australia.

In the U.S., 50 percent of the respondents viewed Russian influence and power as a threat, compared to 48 percent who felt the same about China.

Late last month, the U.S. intelligence community’s annual Worldwide Threat Assessment report warned of waning U.S. influence across the globe, even among allies, with Russia and China seeking to fill the void.

Many U.S. allies, the report said, are “seeking greater independence from Washington in response to their perceptions of changing U.S. policies on security and trade.”

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The Pew survey of 27,612 people in 26 countries was conducted between May 14 and Aug. 12, 2018.

It listed the top perceived threats as climate change, the Islamic State terror group, cyberattacks and North Korea’s nuclear program. (VOA)