Thursday August 22, 2019
Home Lead Story Study Reveals...

Study Reveals Shape and Structure of The Milky Way Galaxy

So our Milky Way's twists are rare but not unique, they said

0
//
Saraswati
Earth is part of the Milky way galaxy. Wikimedia

The Milky Way’s disk of stars is not stable or flat but instead becomes increasingly “warped” and twisted far away from the galaxy’s centre, according to astronomers.

“We usually think of spiral galaxies as being quite flat, like Andromeda which you can easily see through a telescope,” said Professor Richard de Grijs from Macquarie University in Australia.

To understand, the team used 1,339 “standard” stars, each up to 100,000 brighter than our sun, to map the real shape of our home galaxy.

The new 3D map of our galaxy showed that the warped Milky Way disc also contains young stars and confirmed that the warped spiral pattern is caused by torque from the spinning of the Milky Way’s massive inner disc of stars, accordoing to the study published in the Nature Astronomy journal.

From a great distance, our galaxy would look like a thin disk of stars that orbit once every few hundred million years around its central region, where hundreds of billions of stars, together with a huge mass of dark matter, provide the gravitational “glue” to hold it all together.

Representational Image of Milky Way.
Image Source: Wikimedia Commons.

But the pull of gravity becomes weaker far away from the Milky Way’s inner regions. In the galaxy’s far outer disk, the hydrogen atoms making up most of the Milky Way’s gas disk are no longer confined to a thin plane, but they give the disk an S-like warped appearance.”It is notoriously difficult to determine distances from the Sun to parts of the Milky Way’s outer gas disc without having a clear idea of what that disc actually looks like,” said Xiaodian Chen from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing.

“This research provides a crucial updated map for studies of our galaxy’s stellar motions and the origins of the Milky Way’s disk,” added Licai Deng, also from the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Also Read- 2018 Fourth-hottest Year Since 1880; Earth Set to Get Warmer, Says NASA

Astronomers have observed a dozen other galaxies which showed similar progressively twisted spiral patterns in their outer regions.

So our Milky Way’s twists are rare but not unique, they said.  (IANS)

Next Story

New Study Suggests Living Near Parks and Nature Linked to Greater Happiness

Parks near home good for your mental health

0
parks
Green space within 300 metres of home had the greatest influence on mental well-being. Pixabay

Living within 300 metres of urban green space such as parks, nature reserves or play areas is associated with greater happiness, sense of worth and life satisfaction, says a new study.

Using data from UK government’s Annual Population Survey (APS) of 25,518 people, the researchers show that people who live within 300 metres of green space have significantly better mental well-being.

“A lot of research focuses on poor mental health, or single aspects of well-being like life satisfaction. What makes our work different is the way we consider multi-dimensional mental well-being in terms of happiness, life satisfaction and worth,” said Victoria Houlden from the University of Warwick.

The study, published in the journal Applied Geography, found that there is a very strong relationship between the amount of green space around a person’s home and their feelings of life satisfaction, happiness, and self-worth.

parks
The study found that proximity to green space was more important than lifestyle factors such as employment, income and general health. Pixabay

Green space within 300 metres of home had the greatest influence on mental well-being.

The study found that proximity to green space was more important than lifestyle factors such as employment, income and general health.

Also Read: Bolster Your Brisbane Business With A Virtual Office

“By combining advanced statistical and mapping methods, we’ve shown that the effect is real and substantial. Basically we’ve proven what everyone has always assumed was true,” said Scott Weich, Professor at the University of Sheffield. (IANS)