Monday December 10, 2018
Home India Shared Cultur...

Shared Culture: Indian festival in South Africa

0
//
Republish
Reprint

By Megha Sharma

Though located in different continents, India and South Africa have a shared culture and common message for the world.

Looking at the time line, it has been 69 years to the independence of India and 55 years to the sovereign state of South Africa. The stories of their independence come across as an exemplar of survival, hope and determination to the world. The “white man’s burden” of the savior of these lands speaks of a hidden self-fulfilling motif. However, even being geographically different, these states define a cultural synchronicity. Years ago, before the independence of India, a huge amount of passengers settled in and around the coastal areas of the place. These people went not as slaves but to work there as meager labors and with meager or no salaries. However, it turned out to be a boon for them and in the present time and age, Durban, one of the most important commercial spaces in the sub-continent, with the maximum number of Indians as land owners. Durban is the second India, so to say, outnumbering the African population. Furthermore, the entire country is inhabited by approximately 1.5 million (15 Lakh) people of Indian origins. Mahatma Gandhi too earned his “Mahatma” epithet from here, in his 21 year long and crucial stay there. This throws lights on the significant heart-rending connect and shared culture of these territories.

images
Mahatma Gandhi’s influence

Shared History: Experience India in South Africa

In September-October of last year (2015),  a 6 weeks long event was held in Johannesburg where South Africa explored the bounties of the Indian sub-continent in the annually celebrated festival of “Shared History”. The festival explores the contemporary art of the land and it not only includes various art forms like dance, singing etc. but it has given Yoga, a prominent place in the picture of Indian subcontinent. It was initiated in 2007 with the ideology to contribute to both the states’ cultural commonality. It runs for a month and though initiated with an interest towards the internal dynamics of traditional superstructures, it has now paved ways into fields of literature, yoga, handicrafts and all other contemporary flourishing wonders of the Indian sub-continent.  This following introductory video is a brochure to the festival.

 

It gives an insight into the rich and diverse culture of India and becomes a treat to watch the beautiful dancers performing on the folk traditional songs. Moreover, it observes the multifarious Indian cuisines exhibition which brings one closer to the land by uttering its essence to the world. With all these enriching episodes one is given the idea of past as a tool to perceive these boundaries as similar. It seems to be a crucial step by the Indian high commission and an arts society named “teamwork.” It is hosted in the month of October with a worldwide audience and gives sheer knowledge adding to the socio-economic relations with India.

Thus, hopefully the legacy of shared culture continues between India and South Africa.

Megha Sharma is a student at the University of Delhi. She is pursuing her masters in English and has also done her studies in German language.) Email ID: loveme2010.ms@gmail.com

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

World’s Anti-Corruption Day

The U.S. Statement Department said in its Friday statement that it pledges "to continue working with our partners to prevent and combat corruption worldwide."

0
Anti-Corruption
Bulgarian anti-corruption protesters march during a demonstration in downtown Sofia, VOA

Corruption costs the world economy $2.6 trillion each year, according to the United Nations, which is marking International Anti-Corruption Day on Sunday.

“Corruption is a serious crime that can undermine social and economic development in all societies. No country, region or community is immune,” the United Nations said.

The cost of $2.6 trillion represents more than 5 percent of global GDP.

The world body said that $1 trillion of the money stolen annually through corruption is in the form of bribes.

Patricia Moreira, the managing director of Transparency International, told VOA that about a quarter of the world’s population has paid a bribe when trying to access a public service over the past year, according to data from the Global Corruption Barometer.

Moreira said it is important to have such a day as International Anti-Corruption Day because it provides “a really tremendous opportunity to focus attention precisely on the challenge that is posed by corruption around the world.”

Journalist, Anti-Corruption
An activist places candles and flowers on the Great Siege monument, after rebuilding a makeshift memorial to assassinated anti-corruption journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia, in Valletta, Malta. VOA

Anti-corruption commitments

To mark the day, the United States called on all countries to implement their international anti-corruption commitments including through the U.N. Convention against Corruption.

In a statement Friday, the U.S. State Department said that corruption facilitates crime and terrorism, as well as undermines economic growth, the rule of law and democracy.

“Ultimately, it endangers our national security. That is why, as we look ahead to International Anticorruption Day on Dec. 9, we pledge to continue working with our partners to prevent and combat corruption worldwide,” the statement said.

Moreira said that data about worldwide corruption can make the phenomena understandable but still not necessarily “close to our lives.” For that, we need to hear everyday stories about people impacted by corruption and understand that it “is about our daily lives,” she added.

She said those most impacted by corruption are “the most vulnerable people — so it’s usually women, it’s usually poor people, the most marginalized people in the world.”

Anti-Corruption
Anna Hazare raised his voice against corruption and went ahead with his hunger strike at the Jantar Mantar in New Delhi. Wikimedia Commons

The United Nations Development Program notes that in developing countries, funds lost to corruption are estimated at 10 times the amount of official development assistance.

What can be done to fight corruption?

The United Nations designated Dec. 9 as International Anti-Corruption Day in 2003, coinciding with the adoption of the United Nations Convention against Corruption by the U.N. General Assembly.

The purpose of the day is to raise awareness about corruption and put pressure on governments to take action against it.

Tackling the issue

Moreira said to fight corruption effectively it must be tackled from different angles. For example, she said that while it is important to have the right legislation in place to curb corruption, governments must also have mechanisms to enforce that legislation. She said those who engage in corruption must be held accountable.

“Fighting corruption is about providing people with a more sustainable world, with a world where social justice is something more of our reality than what it has been until today,” she said.

Anti-Corruption
It is important to have the right legislation in place to curb corruption

Moreira said change must come from a joint effort from governments, public institutions, the private sector and civil society.

The U.S. Statement Department said in its Friday statement that it pledges “to continue working with our partners to prevent and combat corruption worldwide.”

It noted that the United States, through the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Agency for International Development, helps partner nations “build transparent, accountable institutions and strengthen criminal justice systems that hold the corrupt accountable.”

Also Read: British Parliament Access Internal Facebook Data Scandal Papers: Report

Moreira said that it is important for the world to see that there are results to the fight against corruption.

“Then we are showing the world with specific examples that we can fight against corruption, [that] yes there are results. And if we work together, then it is something not just that we would wish for, but actually something that can be translated into specific results and changes to the world,” she said. (VOA)