Monday February 18, 2019
Home India Shared Cultur...

Shared Culture: Indian festival in South Africa

0
//

By Megha Sharma

Though located in different continents, India and South Africa have a shared culture and common message for the world.

Looking at the time line, it has been 69 years to the independence of India and 55 years to the sovereign state of South Africa. The stories of their independence come across as an exemplar of survival, hope and determination to the world. The “white man’s burden” of the savior of these lands speaks of a hidden self-fulfilling motif. However, even being geographically different, these states define a cultural synchronicity. Years ago, before the independence of India, a huge amount of passengers settled in and around the coastal areas of the place. These people went not as slaves but to work there as meager labors and with meager or no salaries. However, it turned out to be a boon for them and in the present time and age, Durban, one of the most important commercial spaces in the sub-continent, with the maximum number of Indians as land owners. Durban is the second India, so to say, outnumbering the African population. Furthermore, the entire country is inhabited by approximately 1.5 million (15 Lakh) people of Indian origins. Mahatma Gandhi too earned his “Mahatma” epithet from here, in his 21 year long and crucial stay there. This throws lights on the significant heart-rending connect and shared culture of these territories.

images
Mahatma Gandhi’s influence

Shared History: Experience India in South Africa

In September-October of last year (2015),  a 6 weeks long event was held in Johannesburg where South Africa explored the bounties of the Indian sub-continent in the annually celebrated festival of “Shared History”. The festival explores the contemporary art of the land and it not only includes various art forms like dance, singing etc. but it has given Yoga, a prominent place in the picture of Indian subcontinent. It was initiated in 2007 with the ideology to contribute to both the states’ cultural commonality. It runs for a month and though initiated with an interest towards the internal dynamics of traditional superstructures, it has now paved ways into fields of literature, yoga, handicrafts and all other contemporary flourishing wonders of the Indian sub-continent.  This following introductory video is a brochure to the festival.

 

It gives an insight into the rich and diverse culture of India and becomes a treat to watch the beautiful dancers performing on the folk traditional songs. Moreover, it observes the multifarious Indian cuisines exhibition which brings one closer to the land by uttering its essence to the world. With all these enriching episodes one is given the idea of past as a tool to perceive these boundaries as similar. It seems to be a crucial step by the Indian high commission and an arts society named “teamwork.” It is hosted in the month of October with a worldwide audience and gives sheer knowledge adding to the socio-economic relations with India.

Thus, hopefully the legacy of shared culture continues between India and South Africa.

Megha Sharma is a student at the University of Delhi. She is pursuing her masters in English and has also done her studies in German language.) Email ID: loveme2010.ms@gmail.com

 

Next Story

Low Cure Rate For Childhood Cancer in India: Experts

On International Childhood Cancer Day, the hospital organised a ‘Sit and Draw competition’ with pediatric patients and rewarded the winner

0
Term insurance
Health insurance covers only for hospitalization and doesn’t necessarily cover the medical expenses incurred for the treatment of major illnesses. flickr

Childhood cancer comprises almost 3-5 per cent of the total cancer cases in India, experts said here on Friday, expressing concern over the low cure rate due to lack of available data.

“The disturbing reality is that the cure rate of pediatric cancer is almost 80 per cent in the developed countries. When we see the data from major cancer centres, it actually can match up to the Western standard but this data is not enough,” Haemato-Oncologist Vivek Agarwala said at an awareness programme conducted by Narayana Superspecialty Hospital, Howrah.

According to the Indian Council for Medical Research, cancer in children constitutes approximately 3-5 per cent of the total cancer cases in India.

Agarwala said a large portion of the incidence of childhood cancer in society is still not addressed.

Cancer survivor. Flickr

Also, a large section who don’t have access to premier institutes are often diagnosed late due to financial crunch and that is why the overall treatment rate in India is low.

“Probably, the government and society at large are not considering it a big problem as it is just around 5 per cent. We are always campaigning for breast and cervical cancers,” Agarwala said.

“We must remember this 5 per cent of cancer is majorly curable if given proper treatment,” he said.

Leukaemia and retinoblastoma (a form of cancer where children have a white eye) are the two common forms of cancer in children.

Also Read- Push-ups Can Lower The Risk of Heart Diseases

Talking about awareness and symptoms that parents need to watch out for, he said: “Symptoms are different for different cancers, but children who have cancer have poor growth, poor weight gain and decreased appetite. One must get their children evaluated on seeing these symptoms”.

On International Childhood Cancer Day, the hospital organised a ‘Sit and Draw competition’ with pediatric patients and rewarded the winner. (IANS)