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Shia Personal Law Board calls amicable settlement to Ram Janmabhoomi dispute, also blanket ban on Cow Slaughter

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Babri Masjid Demolition. Image source: newsworldindia.in
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Lucknow, April 5, 2017: The Shia Personal Law Board on Tuesday called for an amicable settlement to the Ram Janmabhoomi dispute and sought a blanket ban on cow slaughter.

At the fifth meeting of its executive, members of the body raised the issue of cow slaughter and it was unanimously decided that in view of the tensions between two communities, it was in the interest of all that the government ban it.

In Quran, the members said, slaughtering of the cow was said to be against the tenets of Islam and should henceforth be banned.

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A cleric from the Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti Dargah in Ajmer, Syyed Jail Obaidin Ali Khan openly discussed the controversy surrounding cow slaughter and called for an end to it. “In the background of the rising tensions and the laid down sayings in Quran, we should ban slaughter of cows and sale of its meat,” he said.

He also said that the custom of triple talaq in modern day was not feasible, irrelevant and against the spirit of Quran.

Other speakers also agreed that when a marriage is solemnised with the consent of the bride and the groom, even a matter like divorce should have the consent of both. (IANS)

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Triple Talaq Now Banned In India

While most Hindu personal laws have been overhauled and codified over the years, Muslim laws have been left to religious authorities and left largely untouched.

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Indian Muslim women talk while walking through a market in Ahmadabad, India. VOA

India’s government on Wednesday approved an ordinance to implement a top court ruling striking down the Muslim practice that allows men to instantly divorce.

The government decision came after it failed to get approval of Parliament a year after the court ruled that the practice of triple “talaq” violated the constitutional rights of Muslim women.

Most of the 170 million Muslims in India are Sunnis governed by the Muslim Personal Law for family matters and disputes. The laws include allowing men to divorce by simply uttering the Arabic word “talaq,” or divorce, three times — and not necessarily consecutively, but at any time, and by any medium, including telephone, text message or social media post.

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Triple Talaq continues to plague lives of  women, VOA News

The government will have another six months to get Parliament’s approval for the ordinance to become law. But in the meantime, suspects can be prosecuted using the ordinance.

Law Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad said that nearly 22 countries, including neighboring Pakistan and Bangladesh, have banned the practice and appealed to the opposition to approve the Muslim Women Protection of Rights on Marriage Bill.

India’s Muslim Law Board had told the court that while they considered the practice wrong, they opposed any court intervention and asked that the matter be left to the community. But several progressive Muslim activists decried the law board’s position.

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Muslim women hold placards during a protest against a bill passed by India’s lower house of Parliament last week that aims at prosecuting Muslim men who divorce their wives through the “triple talaq,” or instant divorce. VOA

After the Supreme Court verdict, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government introduced a bill criminalizing the practice and it was approved in December by the lower house of Parliament, where his party commands a majority. But it couldn’t get the approval of the upper house, where the opposition controls the majority of seats.

The main opposition Congress party is opposing a three-year prison sentence for the offenders and wants a parliamentary committee to discuss the issue to reach a consensus. It favors a lesser sentence.

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In India, triple talaq has continued with the protection of laws that allow Muslim, Christian and Hindu communities to follow religious laws in matters like marriage, divorce, inheritance and adoption. While most Hindu personal laws have been overhauled and codified over the years, Muslim laws have been left to religious authorities and left largely untouched. (VOA)