Monday December 17, 2018

500 jaundice cases detected in Shimla

0
//
Republish
Reprint

Shimla: Over 500 jaundice cases were detected in Shimla this winter which has taken the healthcare sector in Himachal Pradesh by surprise.

Shimla civic authorities suspect that mixing of sewage with the potable water has caused the spread of the water-borne disease. The state high court also took Suo Motu cognizance in this regard and sought a status report from the government by Thursday.

Deputy Mayor Tikender Panwar said that effluents from the sewerage treatment plant in Malyana, located the vicinity of the Ashwani Khud drinking water scheme, was mainly responsible for water contamination.

He said that he lodged a criminal negligence complaint with the police against a contractor of the treatment plant on Tuesday who has been accused of discharging sewage in the rivulet without treating it.

Panwar said the government-run treatment plant uses an outdated technology for reusing the water.

The Ashwani Khud drinking water scheme supplies water to one-third of Shimla’s population.

Most of the jaundice cases have been reported from Chotta Shimla, Panthaghati, Vikas Nagar, New Shimla and Kasumpti, a health officer said.

Doctors in the Indira Gandhi Medical College and Hospital (IGMCH) said on an average 15 to 20 patients suffering from jaundice come to the hospital daily. More than 250 patients have been treated in the IGMCH alone so far.

Irrigation and Public Health Minister Vidya Stokes said the government has taken preventive steps to check the further spread of jaundice.

She said water supply from the Ashwani Khad has been temporarily shut till the mixing of untreated water from the sewerage treatment plant is plugged.

Sounding a note of caution, Panwar said the testing of potable water at any level is not done for the virus causing hepatitis because there is no such laboratory in the state.

He said the quality of water supplied from the Ashwani Khud is not good, which is causing repeated epidemic in Shimla.

In 2007, 2010 and 2013, a large number people in the town tested positive for Hepatitis E, a liver problem caused by the consumption of water contaminated by sewerage.

Planned for a maximum population of 16,000, Shimla is home to 170,000 people as per the 2011 census and generates 30.09 million litres per day of sewage. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Study: Partial Dose of Yellow Fever Vaccine Provides Protection

A full dose of yellow fever vaccine provides lifelong immunity. Researchers will continue to study how long people who received partial doses are protected

0
Yellow fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease found in tropical Africa and South and Central America.
Yellow fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease found in tropical Africa and South and Central America. Wikimedia Commons
  • Yellow fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease
  • Severe cases can cause jaundice and death, but most cases involve fever, muscle pain and vomiting
  • More than 350 people have become infected with yellow fever in Brazil since late last year

When stockpiles of yellow fever vaccine run low, partial doses are effective, according to a new study.

The report on the vaccine, which currently is in short supply, comes as officials in Brazil attempt to contain an outbreak with what they describe as the largest-ever mass vaccination campaign using partial doses.

Yellow fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease found in tropical Africa and South and Central America. Severe cases can cause jaundice and death, but most cases involve fever, muscle pain and vomiting.

Also Read: Tips That Will Help In Recovery From Surgery

Congo outbreak, experiment

During a major outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2016, the government aimed to prevent the disease from spreading in the capital, Kinshasa. Health officials launched a mass vaccination campaign targeting 7.6 million people.

But the outbreak had depleted vaccine stockpiles. Hoping to stretch the available supply, the World Health Organization reviewed the small number of available studies on using reduced doses and recommended using one-fifth of a dose per person.

It seemed to work.

Health officials have launched a campaign targeting nearly 24 million people with a one-fifth dose of the vaccine. Wikimedia Commons
Health officials have launched a campaign targeting nearly 24 million people with a one-fifth dose of the vaccine. Wikimedia Commons

Researchers took blood samples from more than 700 people before and after they received the partial dose. In the new study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, nearly all of those vaccinated with the lower dose developed enough antibodies to the virus to prevent infection.

“That was the encouraging thing, that this can be done as a potential way — when there’s supply limitations on the vaccine — to help potentially control an outbreak,” said study co-author Erin Staples at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Hundreds infected

More than 350 people have become infected with yellow fever in Brazil since late last year, and health officials have launched a campaign targeting nearly 24 million people with a one-fifth dose of the vaccine.

Also Read: A spurt in Unneeded Medical Interventions for Healthy Pregnant Women: WHO Study

Staples says the new study is good news for controlling outbreaks like Brazil’s in the short term. But, she notes, “We still need some information about how long immunity will last.”

A full dose of yellow fever vaccine provides lifelong immunity. Researchers will continue to study how long people who received partial doses are protected. (VOA)