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Shodho: LD Engineering College students build job portal to uplift rural women of Gujarat

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Taking a step further towards women emancipation and development, a group of students from LD Engineering College, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, has come up with an online portal called ‘Shodho.’ The portal comes with an aim to uplift Gujarati women coming from rural background. ‘Shodho’ will help them find part time jobs in craftworks and stitching.

The website, a product of students Ketakee Nimavat, Akash Choudhary, Aakash Parmar, Shruti Khatri, Vishwa Shah and Lipi Mehta, is the first of its kind in India.The students have approached several companies and cottage industries that provide jobs in the field of art and crafts. They have also asked some NGOs to train these women so that they could be employed to jobs with reasonable pay scale.

One of the creators of the portal, Ketakee Nimavat, told the Times of India, “Called ‘Shodho,’ the portal currently has listed enterprises that provide jobs of stitching, assembling of toys and embroidery. Each enterprise has an account and a profile page with complete details. The portal will display the list of job openings and the pay offered.”

“The portal aims to streamline the complete process involved in the daily small-scale temporary jobs and remove middlemen who pocket most of the money as commission. This will help rural women get the most out of their work,” said Nimavat.

This noble act done by the students of LD college of engineering and Hasmukh Goswami college of Engineering is praise- worthy. ‘Shodho’ would put the women in direct contact with the job providers, which would eradicate the ‘middle- men system,’ who usually eat away the share of these rural women’s earnings.

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Instagram Helps Women to Overcome Miscarriage Distress: Study

The extent to which this loss affects women and their families, and the longevity of their grief is a blind spot for clinicians

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Instagram
As far as we know, this is the first study to look at the intersection of Instagram and miscarriage. Pixabay

Despite its common occurrence, there is still a lot of stigma surrounding miscarriage and many women find that their emotional and psychological needs are unmet as they go through a devastating grieving process. But for some, Instagram has emerged as a tool to cope with such distress, a study says.

The study, published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, found that the content posted by Instagram users included rich descriptions of the medical and physical experiences of miscarriage, and the emotional spectrum of having a miscarriage and coping with those emotions, the social aspect, and family identity.

“I find it endlessly fascinating that women are opening up to essentially strangers about things that they hadn’t even told their partners or families,” says Dr. Riley. “But this is how powerful this community is,” said Amy Henderson Riley, Assistant Professor at the Jefferson College of Population Health, Thomas Jefferson University, US.

The findings are based on a qualitative research study on 200 posts of text and pictures shared by Instagram users.

“What surprised me the most was how many women and their partners identified as parents after their miscarriage and how the miscarriage lasted into their family identity after a successful pregnancy,” said Rebecca Mercier, Assistant Professor at Thomas Jefferson University.

“The extent to which this loss affects women and their families, and the longevity of their grief is a blind spot for clinicians,” Mercier said.

These personal accounts also provided insight into patients’ perspectives of typically defined experiences.

For example, in the clinic, the typical definition of recurrent pregnancy loss is after three pregnancies. However, the researchers found that many patients who had had two or more miscarriages identified with having recurrent pregnancy loss.

Instagram
Despite its common occurrence, there is still a lot of stigma surrounding miscarriage and many women find that their emotional and psychological needs are unmet as they go through a devastating grieving process. But for some, Instagram has emerged as a tool to cope with such distress, a study says. Pixabay

“I’m hoping that this study will encourage clinicians to point patients to social media as a potential coping tool, as well as to approach this subject with bereaved and expecting parents with more respect and empathy,” Mercier said.

Social media is becoming a common avenue for patient testimonials. For example, the short video-sharing platform TikTok has recently become a home for some users to make videos sharing their personal health struggles.

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“As far as we know, this is the first study to look at the intersection of Instagram and miscarriage,” Riley said.

“But this is a drop in the bucket. Social media platforms are evolving rapidly and a theoretically grounded research must follow,” she added. (IANS)