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Shodho: LD Engineering College students build job portal to uplift rural women of Gujarat

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Taking a step further towards women emancipation and development, a group of students from LD Engineering College, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, has come up with an online portal called ‘Shodho.’ The portal comes with an aim to uplift Gujarati women coming from rural background. ‘Shodho’ will help them find part time jobs in craftworks and stitching.

The website, a product of students Ketakee Nimavat, Akash Choudhary, Aakash Parmar, Shruti Khatri, Vishwa Shah and Lipi Mehta, is the first of its kind in India.The students have approached several companies and cottage industries that provide jobs in the field of art and crafts. They have also asked some NGOs to train these women so that they could be employed to jobs with reasonable pay scale.

One of the creators of the portal, Ketakee Nimavat, told the Times of India, “Called ‘Shodho,’ the portal currently has listed enterprises that provide jobs of stitching, assembling of toys and embroidery. Each enterprise has an account and a profile page with complete details. The portal will display the list of job openings and the pay offered.”

“The portal aims to streamline the complete process involved in the daily small-scale temporary jobs and remove middlemen who pocket most of the money as commission. This will help rural women get the most out of their work,” said Nimavat.

This noble act done by the students of LD college of engineering and Hasmukh Goswami college of Engineering is praise- worthy. ‘Shodho’ would put the women in direct contact with the job providers, which would eradicate the ‘middle- men system,’ who usually eat away the share of these rural women’s earnings.

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Family Size Can Be Determined By Reproductive Rights: Study

To make freedom of choice a reality, the report urges countries to offer universal access to quality reproductive health care

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Reproductive Rights, abortion
A community health worker holds up contraceptives during a lecture on family planning at a reproductive health clinic run by an NGO in Tondo city, metro Manila. VOA

Family size is closely linked to reproductive rights, according to the State of World Population 2018 report.

The U.N. report says people in developed countries tend to have lower fertility rates because of greater access to family planning services, modern contraceptives and age-appropriate sex education.

The director of the U.N. Population Fund office in Geneva, Monica Ferro, says in places where reproductive rights are constrained, either due to lack of resources or government mandates, people have a limited ability to choose the size of their families.

reproductive rights
Google suspends Ireland’s Abortion Referendum Ads, VOA

“Many sub-Saharan African countries, for example, have fertility rates of four or more births per woman,” Ferro said. “At the other end of the spectrum, you have some eastern Asian and European countries with fewer than two births per women. In both cases, individuals face obstacles to the full realization of their reproductive rights.”

The world population is expected to increase by 2.5 billion by 2050, to nearly 10 billion people, with sub-Saharan Africa expected to contribute more than half of that growth.

Women in Africa must overcome many legal and social barriers to achieve control of their fertility, Ferro said.

reproductive rights
Women in Africa must overcome many legal and social barriers to achieve control of their fertility.

“Women may not have the access to medical services,” she told VOA. “They may not have the access to child care. They may not have access to all the institutional and social support that comes with being ready or being able to plan your fertility.”

Also Read: Brisbane, Australia Protests Against Plans To Decriminalise Abortion

To make freedom of choice a reality, the report urges countries to offer universal access to quality reproductive health care, including modern contraceptives and better education.

It also advocates for a change in men’s attitudes toward a woman’s right to choose the number, timing and spacing of children. (VOA)