Tuesday July 23, 2019

Now Comes a Shoe Insole That Could Treat Foot Ulcers Caused Due to Diabetes

A patent is pending on the insole technology. The team is currently seeking corporate partners

0
//
The findings, published in the journal Diabetologia, were based on data from nearly 2,800 children with a first-degree relative with Type-1 diabetes.
New shoe insole could treat diabetic foot ulcers. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a shoe insole that could help make the healing process more portable for people who develop ulcers as a result of diabetes.

Diabetic ulcers commonly result from high blood sugar damaging nerves, which takes away feeling from the toes or feet.

“One of the ways to heal these wounds is by giving them oxygen,” said Babak Ziaie, Professor at the Purdue University in the US.

“We’ve created a system that gradually releases oxygen throughout the day so that a patient can have more mobility.”

Without the ability to feel pain, hits and bumps tend to go unnoticed and skin tissue breaks down, forming ulcers.

A lot of sugar in the bloodstream, along with dried skin as a result of diabetes, further slow the ulcer healing process.

The researchers used lasers to shape silicone-based rubber into insoles, and then create reservoirs that release oxygen only at the part of the foot where the ulcer is located.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“Silicone is flexible and has good oxygen permeability,” said Hongjie Jiang, a post-doctoral researcher at the varsity.

“Laser machining helps us to tune that permeability and target just the wound site, which is hypoxic, rather than poison the rest of the foot with too much oxygen,” Jiang added.

In a paper published in the journal Materials Research Society Communications, the team said the insole can deliver oxygen at least eight hours a day under the pressure of someone weighing about 53-81 kg.

It can also be customised to take on any weight, the study said.

Also Read- Facebook Investors Increase Pressure on CEO Mark Zuckerberg To Step Down

The team envisions a manufacturer sending a patient a pack of pre-filled insoles customised to his or her wound site, based on a “wound profile” obtained from a doctor’s prescription and a picture of the foot.

“This is mass-customisation at low cost,” said Vaibhav Jain, research associate at Purdue.

A patent is pending on the insole technology. The team is currently seeking corporate partners. (IANS)

Next Story

Women with Diabetes at Higher Risk of Heart Failure than Men

The number one leading cause of death for women is heart disease

0
diabetes
The IDF expects by the year 2040 around 313 million women will be suffering from the disease. Pixabay

While doctors know that diabetes raises the risk of heart failure, a global study of 12 million people has found that this risk is greater for women than men. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), currently 415 million adults world-wide live with diabetes – with approximately 199 million of them being women.

In India, which is often called the diabetes capital of the world, there were over 72 million cases of diabetes in 2017 – which means about 8.8 per cent of the country’s adult population had the disease.

While Type-1 diabetes is associated with a 47 per cent excess risk of heart failure in women compared to men, Type-2 diabetes has a nine per cent higher excess risk of heart failure for women than men, said the study published in the journal Diabetologia.

diabetes
Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women and claims 2.1 million female lives every year, more so than men. Pixabay

There are a number of reasons why women with diabetes are at greater risk of heart complications, said study co-author Sanne Peters of The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford.

“Women were reported to have two years’ longer duration of prediabetes than men and this increased duration may be associated with greater excess risk of heart failure in women” said Peters.

“Some major concerns are that women are also being undertreated for diabetes, are not taking the same levels of medications as men and are less likely to receive intensive care,” Peters said.

diabetes
The risk of diabetes is also connected to dental health via glucose tolerance. Pixabay

The IDF reports that girls and women with diabetes experience a range of challenges. Gender roles, power imbalances, socioeconomic inequalities resulting in poor diet and lack of physical activity can all influence vulnerability to diabetes.

ALSO READ: Suffering From Low Blood Pressure? Do an Hour or More of Daily Exercise

Women’s limited access to health services and lack of pro-activity when it comes to seeking treatment for health problems can also amplify the impact of diabetes, particularly in developing countries.

The IDF expects by the year 2040 around 313 million women will be suffering from the disease. Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women and claims 2.1 million female lives every year, more so than men. The number one leading cause of death for women is heart disease. (IANS)