Thursday February 20, 2020

Now Comes a Shoe Insole That Could Treat Foot Ulcers Caused Due to Diabetes

A patent is pending on the insole technology. The team is currently seeking corporate partners

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The findings, published in the journal Diabetologia, were based on data from nearly 2,800 children with a first-degree relative with Type-1 diabetes.
New shoe insole could treat diabetic foot ulcers. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a shoe insole that could help make the healing process more portable for people who develop ulcers as a result of diabetes.

Diabetic ulcers commonly result from high blood sugar damaging nerves, which takes away feeling from the toes or feet.

“One of the ways to heal these wounds is by giving them oxygen,” said Babak Ziaie, Professor at the Purdue University in the US.

“We’ve created a system that gradually releases oxygen throughout the day so that a patient can have more mobility.”

Without the ability to feel pain, hits and bumps tend to go unnoticed and skin tissue breaks down, forming ulcers.

A lot of sugar in the bloodstream, along with dried skin as a result of diabetes, further slow the ulcer healing process.

The researchers used lasers to shape silicone-based rubber into insoles, and then create reservoirs that release oxygen only at the part of the foot where the ulcer is located.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“Silicone is flexible and has good oxygen permeability,” said Hongjie Jiang, a post-doctoral researcher at the varsity.

“Laser machining helps us to tune that permeability and target just the wound site, which is hypoxic, rather than poison the rest of the foot with too much oxygen,” Jiang added.

In a paper published in the journal Materials Research Society Communications, the team said the insole can deliver oxygen at least eight hours a day under the pressure of someone weighing about 53-81 kg.

It can also be customised to take on any weight, the study said.

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The team envisions a manufacturer sending a patient a pack of pre-filled insoles customised to his or her wound site, based on a “wound profile” obtained from a doctor’s prescription and a picture of the foot.

“This is mass-customisation at low cost,” said Vaibhav Jain, research associate at Purdue.

A patent is pending on the insole technology. The team is currently seeking corporate partners. (IANS)

Next Story

Higher Testosterone Levels may Lead to Type 2 Diabetes in Women: Study

Higher testosterone levels ups diabetes risk in women

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Diabetes
Higher testosterone levels increases the risk of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes in women, while reducing the risk in men. Pixabay

Health researchers have revealed that having genetically higher testosterone levels increases the risk of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes in women, while reducing the risk in men.

Higher testosterone levels also increase the risks of breast and endometrial cancers in women, and prostate cancer in men, according to the study published in the journal Nature Medicine.

Despite finding a strong genetic component to circulating testosterone levels in men and women, the authors found that the genetic factors involved were very different between the sexes.

“Our findings provide unique insights into the disease impacts of testosterone. In particular they emphasise the importance of considering men and women separately in studies, as we saw opposite effects for testosterone on diabetes,” said study lead author Katherine Ruth from University of Exeter in UK.

For the findings, the research team used genome wide association studies (GWAS) in 4,25,097 UK Biobank participants to identify 2,571 genetic variations associated with differences in the levels of the sex hormone testosterone and its binding protein sex-hormone binding globulin (SHGB).

Diabetes
Researchers found that in women, genetically higher testosterone increases the risks of type 2 diabetes by 37 per cent, and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by 51 per cent. Pixabay

The researchers verified their genetic analyses in additional studies, including the EPIC-Norfolk study and Twins UK, and found a high level of agreement with their results in UK Biobank.

The team next used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to understand whether known associations between testosterone levels and disease are causal rather than correlative.

They found that in women, genetically higher testosterone increases the risks of type 2 diabetes by 37 per cent, and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by 51 per cent.

However, they also found that having higher testosterone levels reduces T2D risk in men by 14 per cent.

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Additionally, they found that genetically higher testosterone levels increased the risks of breast and endometrial cancers in women, and prostate cancer in men.

“Our findings that genetically higher testosterone levels increase the risk of PCOS in women is important in understanding the role of testosterone in the origin of this common disorder, rather than simply being a consequence of this condition,” said study researcher John Perry from University of Cambridge. (IANS)