Tuesday December 18, 2018

Shun Late Night Cravings to Stay on Dieting Route

There’s more to dieting than just sheer willpower and self-control, shows research

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Shun Late Night Cravings to Stay on Dieting Route
Shun Late Night Cravings to Stay on Dieting Route. Pixabay
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Are you dieting to lose extra weight? Avoid friends who take you to midnight parties as late night cravings or that temptation for alcohol can simply be too strong to resist.

There’s more to dieting than just sheer willpower and self-control, shows research.

“In the fight against obesity, we need to help people become more aware of the various personal, situational and environmental factors that expose them to dietary temptations,” explained Heather McKee of the University of Birmingham in Britain.

In doing this, we can help them to develop the necessary skills to cope successfully with dietary temptations and prevent lapses, he added.

Researchers monitored the social and environmental factors that make people, who are following weight management programs, cheat.

Eighty people who were either part of a weight-loss group or were dieting on their own participated in the one-week study.

They were given cell phones on which they kept an electronic diary of all the temptations that came their way and the situations during which they gave in to these temptations.

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representational image. Pixabay

This helped the researchers to make a complete real-time record, known as ‘ecological momentary assessment’, of participants’ dietary temptations and lapses.

Participants lapsed just over 50 percent of the time when tempted, and were especially vulnerable at night.

They were more likely to give in to alcoholic temptations than to eat a sugary snack or to overindulge.

Also Read: Men Healthier, Happier Than Women: Survey

The stronger the dietary temptation, the more likely a participant was to lapse.

The findings could be valuable for dietary relapse and weight maintenance programmes, noted the study published in the journal Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

“This helps piece together the complex jigsaw surrounding the daily predictors of dietary temptations and help us to better understand how dietary temptations and lapses operate,” said McKee. (Bollywood Country)

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A Healthy Diet Can Help The Treatment of Bipolar Disorder: Study

The team measured body mass index (BMI) at the beginning of the study.

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diet, bipolar
Diet, weight may influence bipolar disorder treatment Flickr

Consuming a healthy balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables can benefit those undergoing treatment for bipolar disorders, a new study suggests.

Bipolar disorder — previously known as ‘manic depression’ — is characterised by episodes of depression and of abnormally elevated mood with periods in between the two extremes.

“We found that people who had a better-quality diet, a diet with anti-inflammatory properties, or a lower BMI, showed better response to add-on nutraceutical treatment than those who reported a low-quality diet, or a diet including foods that promote inflammation, or who were overweight,” said lead researcher Melanie Ashton of Deakin University in Australia.

fibre, bipolar
Foods rich in fibre was found to reduce this adverse effects of stress in mice. Pixabay

The fact that there are two opposite sets of symptoms means that finding an effective treatment is difficult, suggests the study presented at the ECNP Conference in Barcelona.

While current medications are useful, they are better at targeting mania symptoms (the ‘up’ phase), leaving a lack of effective treatment for people experiencing depressive episodes, it added.

For the study, the team involved 133 participants who either took a combination of nutraceuticals (compounds derived from foods such as vitamins or minerals that treat or prevent a disease or disorder) including the anti-inflammatory amino acid n-acetylcysteine (NAC), or NAC alone, or a placebo (a dummy pill) for 16 weeks.

fibre, bipolar
Eat good food. Pixabay

The team measured body mass index (BMI) at the beginning of the study, and then measured depression and how a person is able to function in their day to day life.

The participants filled in a questionnaire about what they usually eat over the year and researchers calculated a diet quality score where good diets included a healthy diet with lots of fruit and vegetables, whereas poorer-quality diets had more saturated fat, refined carbohydrates and alcohol.

Also Read: A Diet rich in Nutrients Helps in Living Longer: Study

“If we can confirm these results, then it is good news for people with bipolar disorder, as there is a great need for better treatments for the depressive phase of bipolar disorder,” Ashton noted. (IANS)