Friday November 22, 2019

Shun Late Night Cravings to Stay on Dieting Route

There’s more to dieting than just sheer willpower and self-control, shows research

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Shun Late Night Cravings to Stay on Dieting Route
Shun Late Night Cravings to Stay on Dieting Route. Pixabay

Are you dieting to lose extra weight? Avoid friends who take you to midnight parties as late night cravings or that temptation for alcohol can simply be too strong to resist.

There’s more to dieting than just sheer willpower and self-control, shows research.

“In the fight against obesity, we need to help people become more aware of the various personal, situational and environmental factors that expose them to dietary temptations,” explained Heather McKee of the University of Birmingham in Britain.

In doing this, we can help them to develop the necessary skills to cope successfully with dietary temptations and prevent lapses, he added.

Researchers monitored the social and environmental factors that make people, who are following weight management programs, cheat.

Eighty people who were either part of a weight-loss group or were dieting on their own participated in the one-week study.

They were given cell phones on which they kept an electronic diary of all the temptations that came their way and the situations during which they gave in to these temptations.

popcorn
representational image. Pixabay

This helped the researchers to make a complete real-time record, known as ‘ecological momentary assessment’, of participants’ dietary temptations and lapses.

Participants lapsed just over 50 percent of the time when tempted, and were especially vulnerable at night.

They were more likely to give in to alcoholic temptations than to eat a sugary snack or to overindulge.

Also Read: Men Healthier, Happier Than Women: Survey

The stronger the dietary temptation, the more likely a participant was to lapse.

The findings could be valuable for dietary relapse and weight maintenance programmes, noted the study published in the journal Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

“This helps piece together the complex jigsaw surrounding the daily predictors of dietary temptations and help us to better understand how dietary temptations and lapses operate,” said McKee. (Bollywood Country)

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Begin Intermittent Fasting For A Healthy Life

Scientists says that intermittent fasting leads to a longer and healthier life

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People who practice intermittent fasting live longer. Pixabay

Intermittent fasting may sound like another diet fad but researcher have conclusively found that the practice of routinely not eating and drinking for short periods of time resulted in longer life in heart patients.

In the study by Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, Utah, researchers found that heart patients who practiced regular intermittent fasting lived longer than patients who don’t.

In addition, they found that patients who practice intermittent fasting are less likely to be diagnosed with heart failure.

“It’s another example of how we’re finding that regularly fasting can lead to better health outcomes and longer lives,” said Benjamin Horne, principal investigator of the study.

While the study does not show that fasting is the causal effect for better survival, these real-world outcomes in a large population do suggest that fasting may be having an effect and urge continued study of the behaviour.

In the study, researchers asked 2,001 Intermountain patients undergoing cardiac catheterization from 2013 to 2015 a series of lifestyle questions, including whether or not they practiced routine intermittent fasting.

Researchers then followed up with those patients 4.5 years later and found that routine fasters had greater survival rate than those who did not.

Fasting affects a person’s levels of hemoglobin, red blood cell count, human growth hormone, and lowers sodium and bicarbonate levels, while also activating ketosis and autophagy – all factors that lead to better heart health and specifically reduce risk of heart failure and coronary heart disease.

Intermittent fasting by heart patients
Heart patients should definitely practice intermittent fasting. Pixabay

“This study suggests that routine fasting at a low frequency over two thirds of the lifespan is activating the same biological mechanisms that fasting diets are proposed to rapidly activate,” said Dr Horne.

Researchers speculate that fasting routinely over a period of years and even decades conditions the body to activate the beneficial mechanisms of fasting after a shorter length of time than usual.

Typically, it takes about 12 hours of fasting for the effects to be activated, but long-term routine fasting may cause that time to be shortened so that each routine faster’s daily evening/overnight fasting period between dinner and breakfast produces a small amount of daily benefit, they noted.

Also Read- Keto Diet May Help Combat the Flu Virus: Research

Fasting is not for everyone. Researchers cautioned that pregnant and lactating women should not fast, as well as young children and frail older adults.

People diagnosed with chronic diseases – especially those who take medications for diabetes, blood pressure, or heart disease – should not fast unless under the close care and supervision of a physician. (IANS)