Tuesday June 25, 2019

Shun Late Night Cravings to Stay on Dieting Route

There’s more to dieting than just sheer willpower and self-control, shows research

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Shun Late Night Cravings to Stay on Dieting Route
Shun Late Night Cravings to Stay on Dieting Route. Pixabay

Are you dieting to lose extra weight? Avoid friends who take you to midnight parties as late night cravings or that temptation for alcohol can simply be too strong to resist.

There’s more to dieting than just sheer willpower and self-control, shows research.

“In the fight against obesity, we need to help people become more aware of the various personal, situational and environmental factors that expose them to dietary temptations,” explained Heather McKee of the University of Birmingham in Britain.

In doing this, we can help them to develop the necessary skills to cope successfully with dietary temptations and prevent lapses, he added.

Researchers monitored the social and environmental factors that make people, who are following weight management programs, cheat.

Eighty people who were either part of a weight-loss group or were dieting on their own participated in the one-week study.

They were given cell phones on which they kept an electronic diary of all the temptations that came their way and the situations during which they gave in to these temptations.

popcorn
representational image. Pixabay

This helped the researchers to make a complete real-time record, known as ‘ecological momentary assessment’, of participants’ dietary temptations and lapses.

Participants lapsed just over 50 percent of the time when tempted, and were especially vulnerable at night.

They were more likely to give in to alcoholic temptations than to eat a sugary snack or to overindulge.

Also Read: Men Healthier, Happier Than Women: Survey

The stronger the dietary temptation, the more likely a participant was to lapse.

The findings could be valuable for dietary relapse and weight maintenance programmes, noted the study published in the journal Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

“This helps piece together the complex jigsaw surrounding the daily predictors of dietary temptations and help us to better understand how dietary temptations and lapses operate,” said McKee. (Bollywood Country)

Next Story

Diet Rich in Calories Cause Brain Health to Deteriorate Faster

High calorie diet causes brain health to decline faster: Study

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Sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease, Kepler, NASA, tissue
A researcher takes a tissue sample from a human brain at the Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson’s UK Tissue Bank, at Imperial College London, Britain June 3, 2016. An appendix, often considered useless, seems to store an abnormal protein, which if it makes its way into the brain, has been found to become a hallmark of Parkinson's. VOA

The unhealthy habits of modern-day living with a diet high in calories may cause brain health to deteriorate faster, according to an Australian study published on Thursday.

Compared to 50 years ago, people currently consume an average of around 650 extra kilocalories each day, which is equivalent to a fast-food meal of a burger, fries and a soft drink, said the study’s lead author, Nicolas Cherbuin of the Australian National University (ANU).

“People are eating away at their brain with a really bad fast-food diet and little-to-no exercise,” Cherbuin, who is a professor at the ANU Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, said in a statement.

“We’ve found strong evidence that people’s unhealthy eating habits and lack of exercise for sustained periods of time puts them at serious risk of developing type 2 diabetes and significant declines in brain function, such as dementia and brain shrinkage,” he added.

Maintain the level of calories to 1600 a day by eating the right amount of portion of the healthy foods
Britain urges people to reduce calories intake to 1600 a day. Wikimedia Commons

According to the study, 30 per cent of the global adult population is either overweight or obese, and over 10 per cent of the world’s adult population will have type 2 diabetes by 2030, reports Efe news.

The expert pointed out that while the link between this type of diabetes and the deterioration of brain function has long been known, research shows that the loss of neurons and their functions begins “much, much earlier”, indicating “a clear association between this brain deterioration and unhealthy lifestyle choices”.

Also Read- If You Can’t Reach Cloud, We’ll Bring it to Your Backyard, Says AWS CEO

“People eating too much of the wrong kind of food, particularly fast food, is the other big worry,” according to the expert, who warned that advice for people to reduce their risk of brain problems, including their risk of dementia, begin too late, mostly when people are in their 60s or later.

“The damage done is pretty much irreversible once a person reaches midlife, so we urge everyone to eat healthy and get in shape as early as possible – preferably in childhood but certainly by early adulthood,” Cherbuin said. (IANS)