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Sikh man Detained at Immigration Check In

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Visa application, (representational Image) Wikimedia

May 14, 2017: Gurmukh Singh had fled persecution in his country and had been in California, United States for nearly two decades after he lost appeal on the latest deportation order made by the U.S. government.

Singh, 47 who is married to Balwinder Kaur, is a father of two US-born daughters. He was taken into custody on Monday by failing to achieve a stay in his case.

In 1998, he sneaked into the United States without a visa via the Mexico border. He later tried to secure religious asylum within the United States but failed to do so. He was later ordered to deport.

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When Singh married his wife who is a US citizen in 2010, he was again surfaced to the deportation case. However this time with the new status of a residency visa.

He was subsequently jailed for five months. The decision proved to be a very difficult time for him and his family. But, after some right activists appealed for his bail he was finally released.

Even though he has been regularly checking with the department of Immigrant and Customs Enforcement, his outcome against the deportation order of 1999 is still pending.

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Alan Lowethal a democratic representative sponsored a private immigration bill last week in an attempt to fix Singh’s immigration status. Singh’s lawyers state that they have filed a request to put the deportation on hold.

Lately, Trump administration’s new laws on tightening the US-Mexico border and boost deportations which have been another major blow to Singh’s case.

The ICE chairperson Virginia Kice says even though America is a country of immigrants, it is a country of laws too.

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On Monday, he told reporters before his check-in that he was afraid of what would happen to his wife, who suffers diabetes, and his daughters, one who is soon headed to college, if he were taken into custody.

“We are completely devastated. This has completely broken us apart, emotionally and physically,” Singh’s 18-year-old daughter Manpreet told AFP.

She said her father has no criminal record, has always paid his taxes and just sought to “live a normal life and feed his family.”

“Watching him emotionally break down is probably the last thing any daughter wants to see,” Manpreet said, her voice breaking.

– By Staff writer at Newsgram

  • Shashank India

    I was refused a student visa 20 years ago even though i had full funding fellowship about at top 20 univ. even though all my brothers and sisters are US citizens , i never tried to enter USa gain legally and illegally bcuz of the illogical outdated us immigration law which gives preference to fraud ,fake and ilegal immigrants. US somehow prefers itselves to be abused all the time.

  • vedika kakar

    This is utter racism. Nobody should go through this

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  • Shashank India

    I was refused a student visa 20 years ago even though i had full funding fellowship about at top 20 univ. even though all my brothers and sisters are US citizens , i never tried to enter USa gain legally and illegally bcuz of the illogical outdated us immigration law which gives preference to fraud ,fake and ilegal immigrants. US somehow prefers itselves to be abused all the time.

  • vedika kakar

    This is utter racism. Nobody should go through this

Next Story

More Students From Fake University In U.S. Arrested, Deported

International students who said they were attending a university have been arrested in Michigan on immigration charges

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DHS & ICE created the University to expose weaknesses in the student visa immigration process
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officer looks on during an operation in Escondido, Calif. A sweeping expansion of deportation powers unveiled this week by the Trump administration has sent chills through immigrant communities and prompted some lawyers to advise migrants to gather up as much documentation as possible. Pay stubs, apartment leases or even gym key tags to prove they’ve been in the U.S. VOA

More international students who said they were attending a university that was actually a shell created by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) have been arrested in Michigan on immigration charges in recent months.

DHS and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) created the University of Farmington to expose weaknesses in the student visa immigration process, Assistant U.S. Attorney Brandon Helms wrote in a sentencing memo, as reported by the Detroit Free Press. The paper broke the story last spring.

“While ‘enrolled’ at the university, 100 percent of the foreign citizen students never spent a single second in a classroom. If it were truly about obtaining an education, the university would not have been able to attract anyone, because it had no teachers, classes or educational services,” the memo said.

While the students were granted student visas to enter the U.S., they were in violation when they did not actually attend the school, federal agencies said. Of about 250 people arrested, more than 200 students voluntarily left the U.S., and 50 stayed until being arrested or deported, the Free Press reported. ICE officials said many of the students were from India.

Students in University
Group of students studying in Library of a University. Pixabay

The paper reported that some students — claiming they were entrapped by the U.S. government, which operated the fake university — hired attorneys to defend their right to stay.

It remains unclear what happened to the tuition and fees paid by the students. It cost approximately $12,000 to enroll in the fake school, the Free Press reported.

ALSO READ: China Alerts Students About Studying in United States

Last winter, eight people were arrested and indicted for conspiracy to commit visa fraud and harboring aliens for profit. Federal agencies said those charged helped at least 600 “foreign citizens to illegally remain, reenter and work in the United States and actively recruited them to enroll in a fraudulent school as part of a ‘pay to stay’ scheme.”

After conviction, the eight were sentenced to between 12 and 24 months. They face deportation after they serve their terms. (VOA)