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Sikh man Veerender Jubbal in soup after fake image showing him as Paris attacker goes viral

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Hate crimes

A Sikh man from Canada found himself in troubled waters after his digitally altered image, falsely portraying him as one of the suicide bombers involved in the Paris attacks, went viral on social media.

Veerender Jubbal can be seen holding a Quran (and wearing a suicide vest in the altered image) instead of an iPad. So much so that the man’s image was published on the front page of one of Spain’s largest newspapers and also used by two leading Italian newspapers.

One of the largest, though unofficial, pro-ISIS channels on Telegram, the same app that the terrorist group used to take responsibility for the Paris attacks, also shared the image.

Khilafa news800
Image: BuzzFeed News / Khilafah News / Telegram

It, however, later came to light that the image was photoshopped as it comprised features that one would not normally associate with an ISIS member.

Image courtesy: BuzzFeed News
Image courtesy: BuzzFeed News

Jubbal pulled out all the stops on Twitter to clear the air over the issue by sharing the original bathroom selfie, adding that he had never been to Paris and that he was a Sikh living in Canada.

Jubbal blamed the supporters of GamerGate, a controversial online movement, whom he had been fighting with on the internet for the past one year for the smear campaign against him.

Jubbal was taken aback when Indian media too started sharing his fake image on their portals. He vowed to take a legal action against the erring media houses.

In this hour of need, Jubbal did not find himself alone with people cutting across lines of religion tweeting in his support.

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U.S. Federal Appeals Court Wont Delay Talks About Net Neutrality

California agreed not to enforce its own state net neutrality law until the appeals court's decision on the 2017 repeal and any potential review by the U.S. Supreme Court.

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Net Neutrality
A sign with an emoji that reads "Don't take net neutrality away" is posted outside the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), in Washington, Dec. 14, 2017. VOA

A federal appeals court said Thursday it would not delay oral arguments set for Feb. 1 on the Trump administration’s decision to repeal the 2015 landmark net neutrality rules governing internet providers.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on Tuesday asked the court to delay the arguments over its December 2017 repeal, citing the partial government shutdown. Without comment, the court denied the request.

The FCC had no immediate comment on the decision.

A group of 22 state attorneys general and the District of Columbia have asked the court to reinstate the Obama-era internet rules and block the FCC’s effort to pre-empt states from imposing their own rules guaranteeing an open internet.

Net Neutrality
State Sen. Scott Wiener, D-San Francisco, left, receives congratulations from Assemblyman Rob Bonta, D-Alameda, center, and Sen. Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, right, after his net neutrality bill was approved by the state Senate. VOA

Several internet companies are also part of the legal challenge, including Mozilla Corp, Vimeo Inc and Etsy Inc, as well as numerous media and technology advocacy groups and major cities, including New York and San Francisco.

The FCC voted to reverse the rules that barred internet service providers from blocking or throttling traffic, or offering paid fast lanes, also known as paid prioritization.

The FCC said providers must disclose any changes in users’ internet access.

‘Misguided’ repeal

The net neutrality repeal was a win for providers like Comcast Corp, AT&T Inc and Verizon Communications Inc, but was opposed by internet companies like Facebook Inc, Amazon. com Inc and Alphabet Inc.

Major providers have not made any changes in how Americans access the internet since the repeal.

net neutrality
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee speaks after signing a bill, March 5, 2018, in Olympia, Washington, that makes Washington the first state to set up its own net-neutrality requirements in response to the FCC’s recent repeal of Obama-era rules. VOA

FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, a Democrat, said on Thursday that the lawsuits are aimed at overturning the agency’s “misguided” repeal of the Obama rules. “The fight for an open internet continues,” she wrote on Twitter.

Also Read: Google Probing ‘Malicious’ Attack on its Internet Traffic

The panel hearing the case is made up of Judges Robert Wilkins and Patricia Millett, two appointees of Barack Obama, and Stephen Williams, an appointee of Republican Ronald Reagan.

In October, California agreed not to enforce its own state net neutrality law until the appeals court’s decision on the 2017 repeal and any potential review by the U.S. Supreme Court. (VOA)