Wednesday December 19, 2018

Simple Ways to Lose Belly Fat After Pregnancy

Capital-based Rita Bakshi, gynaecologist at the International Fertility Centre, suggests how to get back in shape post delivery

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Pregnancy, air pollution
Pregnancy is safe for breast cancer survivors: Experts. Pixabay
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Want to cut belly fat post-pregnancy? Choose fresh food over refrigerated one, don’t consume the same kind of dish everyday and chew well, says an expert.

Capital-based Rita Bakshi, gynaecologist at the International Fertility Centre, suggests how to get back in shape post delivery:

– Fresh fruits: When you eat fruits, remember not to refrigerate them for a long

– Freshly cooked food: Try having food that doesn’t include artificial preservatives and cut down on processed foods

Eat fresh fruits
Eat fresh fruits. Pixabay

– Seasonal vegetables: Seasonal vegetables and fruits are not only good for your body, but also bring about variation in your diet. Do not eat the same food every day as it is unhealthy. But don’t overeat

– Head for the park: Your body requires some time to get back to normal so the best advice would be to get started with general exercises beginning with brisk walking. Also, it is important to take your doctor’s advice before starting any workout regimen.

Also Read: 5 Healthy Ways To Get Back In Shape After Pregnancy

– Yoga: The right yoga asanas, pranayama will help you lose weight earlier than you actually thought. Join a yoga class and start with basics. It is good for physical and mental health

– Chew food: Chewing your food is equally important when you trying to get back to shape. It is a good mouth exercise (Bollywood Country)

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Midwives Want To Reduce Maternal Mortality In South Sudan

South Sudan has added more than 800 midwives and nurses since 2010.

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Midwives, SUDAN
A woman holding her baby in a nursery watches another newborn who is attached to a ventilator at Juba Teaching Hospital in Juba, April 3, 2013. South Sudan has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. VOA

More than 60 people graduated in Juba this week with diplomas in midwifery and nursing. Their goal? To reduce South Sudan’s high rate of maternal mortality.

Eight men were among the 66 graduates of the Kajo Keji Health Science Institute — an unusual occurrence in South Sudan, where midwifery is associated almost exclusively with women.

Samuel Ladu Morish, 26, says he felt he could no longer sit by and watch young women die because of childbirth.

chikungunya, maternal mortality
A woman sits inside a mosquito tent in the town of Abyei, Sudan. VOA

“A lot of mothers are dying so [for] me particularly it pains me. That is why I felt I have to do that course, to try my level best to stop maternal mortality rate in South Sudan,” Morish told VOA’s South Sudan in Focus.

Twenty-one-year-old Leju Henry, another male graduate, said he’s been asked many times why he decided to pursue a course in midwifery. Like Morish, Henry said he wants to help South Sudanese women, especially those who suffer complications in child labor.

“Most people think midwifery is a job for females only, but that is not the truth. … the definition of midwifery [is] that a midwife simply means someone who assists in child above all, but not necessarily means a fellow woman,” Henry said.

According to figures published by the World Health Organization in 2017, South Sudan has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world — 789 women per 100,000 live births.

south sudan's war, chikungunya, maternal mortality
In this photo taken Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018, the winner of Miss World South Sudan 2017, Arual Longar, poses for a portrait at a shelter for street children in Juba, South Sudan. VOA

The rate has actually fallen in recent years, a trend that Makur Koriom, the undersecretary of South Sudan’s Ministry of Health, attributes to increased training of midwives and nurses.

Also Read: Sudan Suffers From A Chikungunya Outbreak

He says South Sudan has added more than 800 midwives and nurses since 2010.

“We believe that’s important, because to address the current health challenges, investing in human resource is very important. But, of course, investment at [the] secondary level without concurrent development at the community level also will not yield [good results], because most of the issues happen at the community level,” Koriom told VOA. (VOA)