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The theme of The Singapore Food Festival is "Rediscover the Foodie in You". Unsplash

The Singapore Food Festival (SFF) will take on a virtual format this year. Themed “Rediscover the Foodie in You”, SFF 2020 will see more than 25 F&B partners coming on board to serve up gastronomic experiences for festival-goers to enjoy at home.

Taking place across this weekend and the next (21-23 August and 28-30 August), Singapore’s dining scene will come to life in the form of virtual food tours, live masterclasses, chef collaborations, food bundles, and limited-edition food merchandise.


In line with the SingaporeRediscovers campaign, Singapore Food Festival also encourages the rediscovery of Singapore’s local cuisine – from the rich depth of foodie traditions to innovative new takes on cuisine which continue to shape the past, present, and future of the food culture. During this challenging period for the F&B industry, SFF 2020 also aims to be a platform for chefs and local F&B businesses to collaborate and showcase their culinary passions and products.


The event will also host virtual food tours around cultural precincts. Unsplash

This year’s festival line-up comprises live masterclasses featuring some of the top names in Singapore’s F&B scene. Some of the names are award-winning pastry chef Cheryl Koh of Tarte by Cheryl Koh, Chef Julien Royer of three Michelin-starred Odette, Michelin star chef Malcolm Lee of renowned Peranakan cuisine restaurant Candlenut and Dave Pynt, chef-owner of the 1 Michelin star modern barbecue restaurant Burnt Ends among others.

The event will also host virtual food tours around cultural precincts – Traditional Taste (Tanjong Pagar/Chinatown), Katong Culture (Katong/Joo Chiat).

Tanjong Pagar and Chinatown are historical and culturally-rich districts and have evolved to become an integral part of Singapore’s key cultural precincts. Both districts are a seamless blend of old and new, with historic landmarks sitting amongst high rise commercial and residential buildings. These precincts have a myriad of food offerings, with many traditional (some even disappearing) food and snack shops nestled alongside hip cafes and trendy bars.

Also Read: Majority Japanese Firms Want Tokyo Olympic Games to be Cancelled or Postponed

The Katong – Joo Chiat precinct is well known for its quaint pastel-hued shophouses adorned with ornamental plasterwork, gesturing at the Peranakan roots in the area. This melting pot of tradition and modernity has grown into a lifestyle district offering multi-ethnic influences most evident in its diverse architecture, dining options, and activities. (IANS)


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