Tuesday November 21, 2017

A Sip of Summer: Taste these 5 Indian Classic Coolers!

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King of Summer Coolers: Lemonade. Pixabay

June 28, 2017: The scorching heat of summers is continuously draining you of your energy, leaving you tired, dehydrated and drowsy.  All you crave for is rejuvenation and refreshment. So here we bring for you a list of super easy drinks which will help you quench the summer thirst.

  1. LEMONADE– The king of the summer drinks, it can never be outdated for the numerous experiments that can be done with it. Add mint leaves to cool your body and add your favorite fruits and pamper your taste buds. If you are a health freak, what goes better than cucumber lemonade? Experiment with this classic drink and it won’t ever let you down.

Lemon Juice. Pixabay

2. BUTTERMILK– It offers you the lightness of yogurt and you can always add cumin powder, mint or curry leaves as per your taste and enjoy the tasty and healthy summer drink. Don’t miss out this desi Indian Drink this summer as it also prevents you from heat strokes.

The Indian Summer Cooler: Buttermilk. Wikimedia

3. MANGO PANNA– Made with tangy raw mangoes, it is slightly sour and sweet in taste with a hint of cardamom and black salt which is sure to captivate your taste buds and is also a rich source of Vitamin C and thus a curative for blood disorders.

Aam Panna. Wikimedia

 

4. WATERMELON SLUSH– This heavenly drink is a savior in hot summers for the benefits it holds. Add mint leaves for more flavor or any fruit as per your taste, this drink will surely cool your mind and body.

Watermelon Drink. Pixabay

5. ICED TEA– Ice this summer with different variations of Iced Tea. Load up on antioxidants by adding peach and mangoes or add the flavor of berries and pomegranate. To add a desi touch, you can go for adding tulsi leaves. From soothing stress to providing minerals, it provides more than just a refreshing boost.

Iced Tea. Pixabay

Just a few simple ingredients and you get a hydrating glass boosting you up with energy without a compromise with your taste buds. So in this hot and tiring summer, just sit on your couch and take a long cool sip of your favorite quencher.

By Supreet Aneja Twitter: @supreet_aneja

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Desi Coolers! 10 Amazing Indian Summer Drinks worth trying this Season

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A smoothie , Pixabay

May 6, 2017: If you are tired of having countless glasses of water this summer, fret no more! Beat the heat and quench your thirst with 10 amazing Indian summer drinks and feel refreshed like never before-

  1. Lassi

Lassi, Wikimedia

Lassi is an extremely popular drink in Northern India. It originated in Punjab and is made my skimming curd. It is available in various flavours and colours. It can be made light or heavy by choice.

  1. Aam Panna

Aam Panna, Wikimedia

Aam panna is renowned for its heat-resistant properties. It is made from green mangoes and is yellow to very light green in color, and is consumed as a tasty and healthy beverage to fight against the intense Indian summer heat. It is considered great for treating gastro-intestinal disorders

  1. Thandai

Thandai, Wikimedia

Like Tom and Jerry, Thandai and Holi are incomplete without each other. The staple drink is prepared with a mixture of  prepared with a mixture of almonds, fennel seeds, magaztari seeds(watermelon kernel), rose petals, pepper, vetiver seeds, cardamom, saffron, milk and sugar. This too can be prepared in many ways like Rose , mango and badam thandai.

 

  1. Jaljeera

Jal Jeera, Wikimedia

Jal-Jeera or cumin water is a cool drink again originating from North India. The main preparation is actually lemonade with Jaljeera powder. It aids digestion and prevents anemia due to rich amount of iron.

  1. Kokum Sherbert

Kokum Sherbet, Wikimedia

Kokum which is also known as the Malabar Taramind is mixed with jeera and black pepper to create the Kokum Sherbert. It has a pulpy texture and pristine aroma. Due to its amazing weight loss properties Kokum can be your breakfast essential!

  1. Sugarcane Juice

Sugarcane Juice, Wikimedia

Extracted from fresh sugarcane it is a quick cooling reagent loaded with carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins and minerals. It contains only 15 calories so we can now shed our winter tummies in a quicker, healthier and tastier way.

  1. Coconut water

Coconut Water, Wikimedia

Available not only throughout the country but also, most parts of the world.  Just cut the top of a coconut and escape the torturing heat. Commonly called as ‘natures sport drink’ or ‘life enhancer’ So just stir it up and drink immediately!

  1. Shikanji

Shikanji, Wikimedia

Lemon, cold water and sugar. Best detoxifying agent and one of the easiest things to prepare to brighten up your day. It makes you leaner and helps in preventing infections. Remember this, the next time someone throws lemons at you.

  1. Piyush

Piyush, Source: Sanjeev Kapoor

Made from curd / buttermilk and shrikhand spiced with cardamom, and nutmeg powder, Piyush is an excellent coolant for summers.It is thicker, creamier and sweeter than Lassi. This drink is great especially if you are fasting as it keeps your hunger pangs away.

  1. Paan (Betel Leaf) Juice 

Paan (betel Leaf) Juice

It is made from paan or betel leaves and a little bit of rose sweetener gulkand.  The aroma though is beyond words. To make it cooler you can also add sabza or basil seeds. It controls bad breath and cogh and has aromatic  simulative properties.

– by staff writer at NewsGram

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Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice hit its lowest extent ever recorded by Satellites: Scientists

The ice floating on top of the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas shrinks in a seasonal cycle from mid-March until mid-September

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Ice Loss in Antarctic Sea, VOA

Washington, March 23, 2017: While Arctic Sea ice reached this year a record low wintertime maximum extent, sea ice around Antarctica also hit its lowest extent ever recorded by satellites at the end of summer in the Southern Hemisphere, scientists have said.

In February this year, the combined Arctic and Antarctic sea ice extent was at its lowest point since satellites began to continuously measure sea ice in 1979, said scientists at NASA and the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in Boulder, Colorado.

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Total polar sea ice covered 16.21 million square km, which is two million square km less than the average global minimum extent for 1981-2010 — the equivalent of having lost a chunk of sea ice larger than Mexico, the study said.

“It is tempting to say that the record low we are seeing this year is global warming finally catching up with Antarctica,” Walt Meier, a sea ice scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, said in a NASA release on Wednesday.

“However, this might just be an extreme case of pushing the envelope of year-to-year variability. We’ll need to have several more years of data to be able to say there has been a significant change in the trend,” Meier added.

The ice floating on top of the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas shrinks in a seasonal cycle from mid-March until mid-September.

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As the Arctic temperatures drop in the autumn and winter, the ice cover grows again until it reaches its yearly maximum extent, typically in March.

The ring of sea ice around the Antarctic continent behaves in a similar manner, with the calendar flipped –it usually reaches its maximum in September and its minimum in February.

This winter, a combination of warmer-than-average temperatures, winds unfavourable to ice expansion, and a series of storms halted sea ice growth in the Arctic, the scientists said.

This year’s maximum extent, reached on March 7 at 14.42 million square kilometres, is 97,00 square kilometres below the previous record low, which occurred in 2015, and 1.22 million square kilometres smaller than the average maximum extent for 1981-2010, according to the scientists. (IANS)

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Social Media Highlights the role of Sexism in Olympics Coverage

These and many other awkward comments by Olympics announcers — defining female athletes by their relationships to men, commenting on their appearances or stereotyping their behaviour

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Representative set of the Olympic medals. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

August 22, 2016: “They might as well be standing in the middle of a mall,” said an NBC announcer. The comment was made when the U.S. women’s gymnastics team was photographed laughing and talking after they blew away the competition in a qualifying round at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

Commentator Al Trautwig said 24-year-old Dutch gymnast Sanne Wevers, who was writing down her score after an event, looked like she was scribbling an entry in her diary.

Announcer Dan Hicks gave the credit for Hungarian swimmer Katinka Hosszu’s gold medal to her husband and coach, calling him “the guy responsible.”

The Chicago Tribune identified bronze medal winner Corey Cogdell-Unrein in a headline as “wife of a Bears lineman,” without mentioning her name or her event, trap-shooting.

A BBC announcer, John Inverness, called a women’s judo match a “catfight” and the next day, interviewing British tennis player Andy Murray about his win, had to be reminded about the achievements of U.S. tennis players Venus and Serena Williams, each of whom has won four Olympic gold medals.

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During gymnastics coverage, two male Fox News announcers devoted several minutes of conversation to the female athletes’ makeup choices. Commentator Bo Dietl said: “When you see an athlete, why should I have to look at some chick’s zits or some guy’s zits on his face? Why not a little blush on her lips, and cover those zits? I like to see a person who wins that gold medal go up there and look beautiful.”

These and many other awkward comments by Olympics announcers- defining female athletes by their relationships to men, commenting on their appearances or stereotyping their behaviour — have made the 2016 Summer Games in Rio the centre of a heated conversation about how female athletes are treated by the media.

Equal time, unequal treatment

The Olympic Games are one of the few times women’s athletics get equal coverage with men’s on television. In 2012, the Games in London were the first to feature women competing in every sport, including boxing.

A 2015 study from the University of Southern California found that Los Angeles broadcast affiliates spent only 3.2 percent of their airtime on women’s sports, a number that actually declined from 5 percent in 1989.

University of Southern California. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
University of Southern California. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

The study found that the sports network ESPN has spent only 2 percent of its time on women sports, a rate that has not changed in 26 years.

But the Olympics are far more balanced: a team of researchers found that 58 percent of the first half of the Olympics telecast from Rio featured female athletes. Yet among journalists covering the Games, only 21 percent are female.

So perhaps it’s understandable that sportscasters and reporters are being criticised for how they talk about women — they have had very little practice, and these Games seem to be the first in which gender equality in sports coverage has become a major topic.

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A study from Cambridge University, released just prior to the beginning of the Rio Olympics, looked at more than 160 million words from news articles, social media, internet forums and elsewhere, analysing the words used to describe men and women in association with Olympic sports.

Men were found to be more often described as “great,” “strong” and “fastest.” Women, however, were most often described in terms that had nothing to do with their athletic ability: “aged,” “older,” “pregnant,” “married.”

Los Angeles-based market researcher Rebecca Brooks says such differentiations have existed for decades.

“I would argue that sexism in Olympics coverage is nothing new,” Brooks says. “Many of the broadcasters covering the Rio Olympics are the same reporters who have covered the events in past decades.”

Why, then, has sexist language in Olympic coverage become an issue this year?

Social media may be the answer, according to experts.

Social media feedback

“Today, the feedback loop for any on-camera performer is instantaneous via Twitter and Facebook and Snapshot,” says James Furrier, a journalist who teaches at Metropolitan State University in Denver, Colorado.

“Now we have MP3 files and YouTube and social media, weapons brandished by a ready-and-willing vast population of analysts, critics, pundits and trolls, all taking their chops whenever a broadcaster fluffs (makes an error),” Furrier says.

Not only is the audience able to respond quickly on social media, says A.J. Marsden, assistant professor of psychology at Beacon College in Leesburg, Florida, “millennials are a little more keen to pick up on these things.”

“A number of people who have been accused of sexist statements are a little bit older; they’re not used to being called out on this stuff. I don’t think they’re being intentionally sexist,” Marsden says.

She also notes that sexism in Olympics coverage goes both ways.

NBC morning host Hoda Kotb and correspondent Jenna Bush Hager smoothed coconut oil across the torso of Congolese athlete Pita Taufatofua on live television the day after the Olympics’ opening ceremony.

And Cosmopolitan magazine recently ran an article called “36 Summer Olympic Bulges That Deserve Gold,” featuring photos of male Olympic athletes wearing tight briefs. Sharp-eyed readers pointed out on social media that just two years earlier, Cosmopolitan had published an article titled “Men Who Objectify Women Are Effing Horrible.”

Journalist Lindy West, who writes about gender equality and body image, wrote a column for Britain’s The Guardian newspaper in which she offered some tips to journalists writing about female athletes.

“Don’t spend more time discussing female athletes’ makeup, hairdos, very small shorts, hijabs, bitchy resting faces, voice pitch, thigh circumference, marital status and age than you spend analysing the incredible feats of strength and skill they have honed over a lifetime of superhuman discipline and restraint.”

Instead, she said, journalists should write about female athletes “the way you write about male athletes — i.e., without mentioning their gender except maybe in the name of the sport.”

Kris Macomber, a sociology professor at Meredith College in Raleigh, North Carolina, thinks the increased discussion about the way we describe athletes during the competition will improve accountability over time.

Progress

“Social media gives a voice to many who would otherwise be kept out of the conversation. Historically, voices of dissent and critique were marginalised and silenced,” Macomber says. “But today, with the internet and Twitter and the like, you can no longer silence people.

“When we see unfairness, we want to voice our dissent and now we have the means and platform to do so,” she adds.

Meanwhile, not all the news about Olympics coverage is bad. Female athletes are speaking up for themselves.

Nineteen-year-old U.S. gymnast Simone Biles told Sporting News that her considerable accomplishments — four gold medals and a bronze — should not be measured in relation to the accomplishments of male athletes.

“I’m not the next Usain Bolt or Michael Phelps,” she said. “I’m the first Simone Biles.”

As for how this year’s Rio Games will be remembered, the Cambridge experts who studied words associated with male and female Olympians will have some input. They plan to release an analysis of this year’s Olympics coverage in the next few weeks. (VOA)

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