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New vaccine to offer treatment for acne. Pixabay

In case you don’t feel like stepping out due to acne, just log in. Thanks to technology, many people have begun to explore online platforms like Skype and chat messengers or phone calls for expert advice on skin-related problems.

This mode of consultation is restricted to quick-fix beauty treatments like botox, skin-polishing, fillers or for basic problems like tanning, acne, pigmentation and even cough and cold.


“Over the years, the use of technology has grown by leaps and bounds. We also have to keep abreast. The trend has increased tremendously. While a considerable number still prefers to come to us at the hospital, there is a substantial number taking initial consultation over phone/video applications. Given the clarity of videoconferencing, we can look at basic problems,” Mumbai-based dermatologist Satish Bhatia told IANS on telephone.

“When consulting through means other than physical observation, there is more frequent check-ups, and for the final consultation patients have to come to the clinic,” he added.

Another Mumbai-based dermatologist, Apratim Goel, explains what kind of queries they generally get.

“We get varied types of beauty queries on phone and mail. Right from acne, allergies to tanning and excessive hair growth and birth marks. But most common are those related to acne, stretch marks and how to remove pigmentation and get glowing skin,” he said.

“So we take the detailed history and also ask a patient to post us a close-up picture of the front and side of a face on mail. For minor skin issues we generally give consultations but do not give prescriptions without seeing them first. It is always advisable that the patient first comes for a consultation and then does the follow-up on phone or e-mail,” he added.


So how are the experts paid in such cases? For one, there is no fixed rulebook. Pixabay

Another advantage is that people in smaller cities can consult well-known experts in metros without having to visit them in the initial stages.

“We have received queries from Patna, Lucknow, Bhopal, to name a few places. New patients generally get to learn about us through word of mouth and then they contact us either through phone or e-mail,” said Indu Tolani, a dermatologist.

“People in tier-2, tier-3 cities generally cannot afford to visit us for small dermatological problems, especially for problems like hair fall and treatments like hair transplantation. Such patients can get immediate advice on phone and then once in a while they can come for treatments,” she added.

So how are the experts paid in such cases? For one, there is no fixed rulebook.

“Nothing is fixed. If the person is known to us, we sometimes don’t charge for a telephonic consultation. In the case of a first-time caller also, we generally don’t charge and if that person comes to consult us at the clinic then he or she is charged accordingly,” said Tolani.

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Though the technology-driven scenario makes things a lot easier, Goel points out it has its limitations.

“To a large extent, technology is good. But not totally. Firstly, examining the skin personally makes a lot of difference versus doing it on mail or web. Secondly, lots of these patients require the help of lasers and other procedures, which cannot be carried out on phone,” said Goel.

“So I would say there is definitely a limitation in handling skin issues on phone and mail, but, yes, in some cases like allergies and skin reactions, the instant help on phone helps a lot. At times we provide online help and then ask the client to come to us as soon as possible. This ensures the immediate help that prevents skin from getting worse,” he added. (Bollywood Country)


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It is believed that when a woman goes through her menstrual cycle, she goes through the different lunar energies.

Well, if you'll notice then the moon takes twenty-nine days to complete its lunar cycle, whereas women's menstrual cycle is generally 28 days! Coincidence? I think, not.

It is believed that when a woman goes through her menstrual cycle, she goes through the different lunar energies. In fact, in ancient times it was said that the natural rhythm of women was to menstruate under a new moon and ovulate under a full moon.

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Hugs, caress scenes, extramarital affairs, vulgar and bold dressing, bed scenes and intimacy of married couples are being glamourised in utter disregard to Islamic teachings and culture of Pakistani society," PEMRA stated

The Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority (PEMRA) has directed Pak TV channels to stop airing what it calls indecency and intimacy in dramas, Samaa TV reported.

A notification issued by the authority states that it has been receiving numerous complaints from viewers who believe that the content being depicted in dramas does not represent the "true picture of Pakistani society".

"PEMRA finally got something right: Intimacy and affection between married couples isn't 'true depiction of Pakistani society and must not be 'glamourized'. Our 'culture' is control, abuse, and violence, which we must jealously guard against the imposition of such alien values," said Reema Omer, Legal Advisor, South Asia, International Commission of Jurists.

"Hugs, caress scenes, extramarital affairs, vulgar and bold dressing, bed scenes and intimacy of married couples are being glamourized in utter disregard to Islamic teachings and culture of Pakistani society," PEMRA stated, as per the report.

The authority added that it has directed channels time and again to review content with "indecent dressing, controversial and objectionable plots, bed scenes and unnecessary detailing of events".

Most complaints received by the PEMRA Call Centre during September concern drama serial "Juda Huay Kuch is Tarah", which created quite a storm on social media for showing an unwitting married couple as foster siblings in a teaser for an upcoming episode. However, it only turned out to be a family scheme after the full episode aired, but by that time criticism had mounted on HUM TV for using the themes of incest to drive the plot, the report said. (IANS/JB)

Keywords: Pakistan, Islam, Serials, Dramas, Culture, Teachings.


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Dozens of female high school and university students in Afghanistan have joined vocational centers to learn tailoring and cosmetology

Dozens of female high school and university students in Afghanistan have joined vocational centers to learn tailoring and cosmetology as the women and girls have been banned from school and university since the Taliban took over the country, Tolo News reported.

According to these girls, sitting at home is very difficult for them, therefore they are willing to learn a profession.

"It has been a couple of months that we are at home since schools and universities were closed. We have to learn a profession or a job because we can't sit like this at home," said Samira Sharifi, a student.

"I want to learn a profession for my future to help my family, we want our schools to be opened so that we can carry on with our education," said Mahnaz Ghulami, a student.

Most of the trainees in the vocational centres are students of high schools and universities.

After the closure of high schools and universities across Afghanistan, Herat female students have started gaining vocational training in the province.

"We have decided to learn tailoring along with our education," said Shaqaiq Ganji, a student.

"It's necessary for every woman to learn tailoring to help her family and her husband, especially in this bad economic situation," said Laili Sofizada, a teacher.

Due to the closure of schools and universities, the number of students in vocational centers doubled compared to recent years, the report added.

"Our classes had the capacity of 20 to 25 students but we increased it to 45 students, because most of the students have lost their spirit, and their schools and universities have closed," said Fatima Tokhi, director of technical and professional affairs at the Herat department of labour and social affairs.

The Labour and Social Affairs department of Herat said the department is working to provide more opportunities for Herat girls and women to learn vocational training.

"The art and professional sector and the kindergarten departments have started their activities, we support them and supervise their activities," said Mulla Mohammad Sabit, head of the labour and social affairs of Herat.

During the past two months, most of the women and girls who worked in state and private institutions lost their jobs and are trying to learn handicrafts and vocational training. (IANS/JB)


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