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Is Your Child Not Getting Enough Sleep Due to Early School Hours? He is at risk of Developing Depression and Anxiety, Says New Study

School timings not only affect the sleeping habits but also the daily functioning of the body, which can harm the child's physical and mental health

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Unhealthy sleeping patterns can lead to major health problems like obesity, heart disease and others in adulthood, Wikimedia
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New York, October 9, 2017 : Is your child not getting ample sleep due to early school hours? Beware, your kid is more likely to develop depression and anxiety, warns a new study. The study reveals that children, who start schooling before 8:30 a.m., get insufficient sleep or barely meet the minimum amount of sleep, that is 8-10 hours, needed for healthy functioning of the body.

“Even when a student is doing everything else right to get a good night’s sleep, early school start times put more pressure on the sleep process and increase mental health symptoms, while later school start times appear to be a strong protective factor for teenager,” said Jack Peltz, Professor at the University of Rochester in the US.

School timings not only affect the sleeping habits but also the daily functioning of the body. It aggravates major health problems like obesity, heart disease and others in adulthood. The study, published in the journal Sleep Health, suggested that maintaining a consistent bedtime, getting between eight and 10 hours of sleep, limiting caffeine, turning off the television, cell phone and video games before bed may boost sleep quality as well as mental health.

ALSO READ Prolonged Depression Can Change Structure of Your Brain

The researchers used an online tool to collect data from 197 students across the country between the ages of 14 and 17. The results showed that good sleep hygiene was directly associated with lower average daily depressive or anxiety symptoms across all students.

The risk of depression was even lower in the students who started school after 8:30 a.m. in comparison to those who started early. “One possible explanation for the difference may be that earlier starting students have more pressure on them to get high quality sleep,” Peltz stressed. (IANS)

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Exercise May Help Beat Genetic Predisposition to Obesity in Elderly Women

Ladies, stop blaming genes for your larger waistline as you can overcome the genetic predisposition to obesity through exercise, a new study suggests.

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The researchers describe 'Ankrd16' as
Old Woman. pixabay

Ladies, stop blaming genes for your larger waistline as you can overcome the genetic predisposition to obesity through exercise, a new study suggests.

The study found that physical activity reduces the influence of genetic predisposition to obesity, and this effect is more significant in the oldest age group — women aged 70 years and older.

These findings additionally support guidelines for promoting and maintaining healthy behaviours, especially in older adults, to maximize quality and longevity of life, the researcher said.

The researchers found that greater symptoms of depression were linked to worse episodic memory -- a person's ability to remember specific experiences and events.
representational image. pixabay

“We are born with our genes, but this study suggests that we can improve our lives and health with exercise, regardless of genetics,” said Joann Pinkerton, executive director at the North American Menopause Society in the US.

“As women age, exercise has been shown to improve muscle mass, balance and bone strength. It also invigorates brain cells, is associated with less arthritic pain, and improves mood, concentration, and cognition”, Pinkerton added.

The researchers also mentioned that regardless of age, genes, and amount of abdominal fat or body mass index (BMI), regular exercise can improve health.

Also Read: New Study Shows That Elderly With Symptoms of Depression Are More Prone to Memory Problems

For the study, published in the journal Menopause, the researchers analysed more than 8,200 women.

The previous studies have suggested that the genetic influence on BMI increases from childhood to early adulthood, the researcher said. (IANS)

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