Friday November 16, 2018

Losing Just 6 Hours of Sleep May Spike up Diabetes Risk: Study

During the sleep/wake period, the animals also had limited opportunity for physical activity

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Sleeping too much can also affect your mental skills. Pixabay
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Being deprived of sleep for just six hours or a single night may affect the liver’s ability to produce glucose and process insulin, increasing the risk of metabolic diseases such as fatty liver and Type-2 diabetes, warns a study.

Sleep deprivation has been associated with eating more, moving less and having a higher risk of developing Type-2 diabetes.

However, “it was not clear whether glucose intolerance was due to the changes in food intake or energy expenditure or to the sleep deprivation itself,” explained a team of researchers from Toho University in Japan.

In the study done over mice, blood glucose levels were found significantly higher in the sleep deprivation group than controls after one six-hour session of wakefulness.

Triglyceride (fat) levels and the production of glucose in the liver also increased in the sleep deprivation group after a single wake period.

Elevated liver triglycerides are associated with insulin resistance, or the inability of the body to process insulin properly.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

In addition, lack of sleep changed the expression of enzymes that regulate metabolism in the liver in the sleep deprivation group.

These findings suggest that “intervention studies designed to prevent sleep deprivation-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance should be performed in the future,” the researchers noted.

For the study, published in the American Journal of Physiology — Endocrinology and Metabolism, the team examined two groups of mice.

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One group was kept awake for six hours each night (“sleep deprivation”), while the control group was allowed to sleep as desired.

The team offered unlimited high-fat food and sugar water — mimicking lifestyle-related food choices that people make — to both groups prior to the study.

During the sleep/wake period, the animals also had limited opportunity for physical activity. (IANS)

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Grief Is Bad For The Heart: Study

Bereaved individuals are more susceptible to the negative health effects of poor sleep, the study said.

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inflammation, grief
Why grief is bad for the heart Pixabay

Sleep disturbance among people grieving the recent loss of a spouse may put them at increased risk for cardiovascular illness and death, a study has warned.

Recently widowed people are more likely to suffer from sleep disturbances, such as insomnia, that may lead to increased levels of inflammation in the body.

Higher levels of inflammation may in turn increase risk for heart diseases, showed the findings published in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine.

The study found that the link between sleep disturbances and inflammation was two to three times higher for the bereaved spouses.

sleeping, impairment, inflammation
The researchers found that the link between sleep disturbances and inflammation was two to three times higher for the bereaved spouses.
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“The death of a spouse is an acutely stressful event and they have to adapt to living without the support of the spouse,” said Diana Chirinos from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, US.

“Add sleep disturbance to their already stressful situation and you double the stressor. As a result, their immune system is more overactivated,” Chirinos said.

The study included 101 people with an average age of 67. Half were bereaved (identified through obituaries), and the rest were included in a control group.

The researchers compared the self-reported sleep habits of recently widowed people to the control group. Both the groups had sleep disturbances.

heart-rate, inflammation
Higher levels of inflammation may in turn increase risk for heart diseases (IANS)

The researchers found that the link between sleep disturbances and inflammation was two to three times higher for the bereaved spouses.

Also Read: Exposure to Arsenic, Lead May Spike up Risk of Heart Disease

Inflammation was measured by the level of proinflammatory cytokines, which are designed to be short-term fighters of disease but are linked to long-term risk for health problems including cardiovascular disease.

Bereaved individuals are more susceptible to the negative health effects of poor sleep, the study said. (IANS)