Wednesday September 19, 2018

Sleep For Less Than 6 Hours Increases Health Risk: Study

The research also showed that people who had short or disrupted sleep were also more likely to have metabolic syndrome.

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Less than 6 hours of sleep linked to hardened arteries Pixabay
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Sleeping less than six hours or waking up several times in the night is associated with an increased risk of asymptomatic atherosclerosis, which silently hardens and narrows arteries, warns a study.

“Failure to get enough sleep and restlessness during the night should be considered risk factors for blocking or narrowing of the arteries,” said study author Fernando Dominguez of the Spanish National Centre for Cardiovascular Research (CNIC) in Madrid.

The study, presented at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2018 in Munich, Germany, involved nearly 4,000 healthy middle-aged adults who wore a waist band activity monitor for seven days to record sleep quality and quantity.

They were divided into five groups according to the proportion of fragmented sleep, and four groups designating average hours slept a night – less than six (very short), six to seven (short), seven to eight (the reference), and more than eight (long).

Atherosclerosis, sleep
Atherosclerosis, the narrowing of arteries. Flickr

Atherosclerosis, the narrowing of arteries due to plaque build-up on the artery walls, was assessed in leg and neck arteries using three-dimensional ultrasound.

The average age of participants was 46 years and 63 per cent were men.

The researchers found that those in the highest quintile of fragmented sleep were more likely to have multiple sections of arteries with atherosclerosis compared to those in the lowest quintile.

“Studies are needed to find out if sleeping well and long enough can prevent or reverse this effect on the arteries,” Dominguez said.

sleeping
The average age of participants was 46 years and 63 per cent were men.
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“In the meantime, it seems sensible to take steps to get a good night’s sleep — such as having a physically active lifestyle and avoiding coffee and fatty foods before bedtime,” Dominguez added.

Also Read: There’s No Healthy Level for Consuming Alcohol, Lancet Study Confirms

The research also showed that people who had short or disrupted sleep were also more likely to have metabolic syndrome, which refers to the combination of diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity, and depicts an unhealthy lifestyle. (IANS)

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Asthma Ups The Chance Of Obesity: Study

The increase in the risk of obesity was even greater in people whose asthma began in adulthood.

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Obesity, Asthma
Asthma may up obesity risk. Pixabay

While obesity is already known as a risk factor for developing asthma, a new research led by one of an Indian-origin has showed that people with the airway disease are also more likely to become obese.

The study indicates that those who develop asthma as adults and those who have non-allergic asthma are at the greatest risk of obesity.

The relationship between asthma and obesity is more complex than previously thought and more research is needed to better understand and tackle these two growing health challenges, the researchers said.

Obesity, Asthma
They found that 10.2 per cent of people with asthma at the start of the study had become obese ten years on Flickr Commons

“We already know that obesity can be a trigger for asthma, perhaps via a physiological, metabolic or inflammatory change,” said Subhabrata Moitra, research student at the ISGlobal – the Barcelona Institute for Global Health in Spain.

However, the researchers do not know the reason why having asthma increases the risk of developing obesity or whether different asthma treatments have any effect on this risk.

The team included 8,618 people from 12 countries who were followed for 20 years.

Obesity, Pregnancy
The relationship between asthma and obesity is more complex than previously thought. Pixabay

They found that 10.2 per cent of people with asthma at the start of the study had become obese ten years on. Among people who did not have asthma, 7.7 per cent were obese ten years later.

Also Read: Exposure to Pollen During Pregnancy May up The risk of Asthma in Kids

The increase in the risk of obesity was even greater in people whose asthma began in adulthood. It was also greater in people who had asthma but did not suffer with allergies, the findings showed.

The results were presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress in Paris. (IANS)