Friday October 18, 2019

Sleep For Less Than 6 Hours Increases Health Risk: Study

The research also showed that people who had short or disrupted sleep were also more likely to have metabolic syndrome.

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Sleeping less than six hours or waking up several times in the night is associated with an increased risk of asymptomatic atherosclerosis, which silently hardens and narrows arteries, warns a study.

“Failure to get enough sleep and restlessness during the night should be considered risk factors for blocking or narrowing of the arteries,” said study author Fernando Dominguez of the Spanish National Centre for Cardiovascular Research (CNIC) in Madrid.

The study, presented at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2018 in Munich, Germany, involved nearly 4,000 healthy middle-aged adults who wore a waist band activity monitor for seven days to record sleep quality and quantity.

They were divided into five groups according to the proportion of fragmented sleep, and four groups designating average hours slept a night – less than six (very short), six to seven (short), seven to eight (the reference), and more than eight (long).

Atherosclerosis, sleep
Atherosclerosis, the narrowing of arteries. Flickr

Atherosclerosis, the narrowing of arteries due to plaque build-up on the artery walls, was assessed in leg and neck arteries using three-dimensional ultrasound.

The average age of participants was 46 years and 63 per cent were men.

The researchers found that those in the highest quintile of fragmented sleep were more likely to have multiple sections of arteries with atherosclerosis compared to those in the lowest quintile.

“Studies are needed to find out if sleeping well and long enough can prevent or reverse this effect on the arteries,” Dominguez said.

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The average age of participants was 46 years and 63 per cent were men.
Pixabay

“In the meantime, it seems sensible to take steps to get a good night’s sleep — such as having a physically active lifestyle and avoiding coffee and fatty foods before bedtime,” Dominguez added.

Also Read: There’s No Healthy Level for Consuming Alcohol, Lancet Study Confirms

The research also showed that people who had short or disrupted sleep were also more likely to have metabolic syndrome, which refers to the combination of diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity, and depicts an unhealthy lifestyle. (IANS)

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Heavier Babies are More Prone to Childhood Allergies: Research

For the study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the research team carried out a systematic review assessing past studies in humans

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For each kilogram increase in birth weight of Babies, there was a 44 per cent increase in the risk that a child had food allergies or a 17 per cent increase in the risk that they had eczema. Pixabay

Parents, take note. Researchers have found that heavier babies are more likely to suffer childhood food allergies or eczema.

For the study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the research team carried out a systematic review assessing past studies in humans.

After screening more than 15,000 studies, they identified 42 that included data on more than two million allergy sufferers.

“We analysed the associations between birth weight, corrected for gestational age, and the incidence of allergic diseases in children and adults,” said Kathy Gatford from the University of Adelaide in Australia.

“For each kilogram increase in birth weight there was a 44 per cent increase in the risk that a child had food allergies or a 17 per cent increase in the risk that they had eczema,” Gatford said.

According to the researchers, they analysed studies that included over 2.1 million people affected by allergic dermatitis, commonly known as eczema, nearly 70,000 people affected by food allergies and over 100,000 people with allergic rhinitis or hay fever.

Most of the studies were in children from developed countries and most were European.

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Study Says that heavier Babies are more likely to suffer childhood food allergies or eczema. Pixabay

“Allergic diseases including eczema, hay fever, food allergies, anaphylaxis and asthma are estimated to affect 30-40 per cent of the world’s population,” Gatford said..

“It is increasingly clear that genetics alone do not explain risks of developing allergies, and that environmental exposures before and around birth can programme individuals to increased or decreased risk of allergies,” Gatford added.

ALSO READ: Cow Numbers in India Witnesses a Sharp Increase Since 2012

Most of the allergies in these studies were assessed in young children. (IANS)