Tuesday October 15, 2019

Sleeping Less Than 6 Hours a Day Could be Deadly for Some: Study

The increased risk of early death for people with high blood pressure or diabetes was negligible if they slept for more than six hours, the research showed

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sleeping, impairment, inflammation, SLeep
Don't consume caffeinated drinks less than six hours before you go to sleep. Pixabay

Those with high blood pressure, Type-2 diabetes, heart disease or stroke could be at high risk of cancer and early death when sleeping less than six hours a day, says a study.

“Our study suggests that achieving normal sleep may be protective for some people with these health conditions and risks,” said lead study author Julio Fernandez-Mendoza from Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey in Pennsylvania, US.

“However, further research is needed to examine whether improving and increasing sleep through medical or behavioural therapies can reduce risk of early death,” Fernandez-Mendoza said.

For the study, the researchers analysed the data of more than 1,600 adults who were categorised into two groups as having stage 2 high blood pressure or Type-2 diabetes and having heart disease or stroke.

Participants were studied in the sleep laboratory for one night and then researchers tracked their cause of death up to the end of 2016.

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Soothing colours, right scent aid sound sleep. Pixabay

The researchers found that of the 512 people who passed away, one-third died of heart disease or stroke and one-fourth died due to cancer.

People who had high blood pressure or diabetes and slept less than six hours had twice the increased risk of dying from heart disease or stroke, showed the findings published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

People who had heart disease or stroke and slept less than six hours had three times the increased risk of dying from cancer.

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The increased risk of early death for people with high blood pressure or diabetes was negligible if they slept for more than six hours, the research showed.

“Short sleep duration should be included as a useful risk factor to predict the long-term outcomes of people with these health conditions and as a target of primary and specialised clinical practices,” Fernandez-Mendoza said. (IANS)

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Proper Rest can Help in Lowering PTSD Symptoms: Study

Study says that rest can reduce the levels of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

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A period of Rest after a traumatic event can reduce the subsequent development of involuntary 'memory intrusions', one of the symptoms in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Pixabay

A period of rest following a traumatic event could reduced the subsequent development of involuntary ‘memory intrusions’, one of the hallmark symptoms in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new study said.

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggested that memory disturbances in PTSD might be ameliorated by increased ‘consolidation’ (a process by which memories are stored and contextualised), which could shed new light on treatment and prevention.

“Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms that are at play when some people develop memory disturbances following trauma while others do not,” said the study’s lead author Lone Horlyck from the University College London.

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Research Says that strengthening of contextual memory system through rest is beneficial in preventing memory intrusions caused by trauma. Pixabay

For the findings, the researchers presented 85 participants with emotionally negative videos, followed by either a period of wakeful rest or a simple control task, where participants were required to pay attention to numbers on a screen.

The videos comprised highly emotional content, such as badly injured people or serious accidents.

The study found that participants who had a period of rest following the viewing of negative videos reported fewer memory intrusions related to the videos over the following week.

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Specific brain systems can be Targetted to reduce development of PTSD through Rest. Pixabay

Rest and certain phases of sleep are known to increase processing in the hippocampus, a key region of the brain for memory, and which places memories in context.

According to the researchers, the results suggested that a strengthening of this contextual memory system was beneficial in preventing memory intrusions following trauma.

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“The results show that specific brain systems could be targeted to reduce development of PTSD and may explain why treatments that focus on re-exposure and integrating the trauma with other information are beneficial,” said the study’s senior author, Professor Neil Burgess. (IANS)