Monday December 16, 2019

Smart Toilet Seats can Monitor Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

The toilet seats are equipped to measure the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart, and can monitor heart rate, blood pressure, blood oxygenation levels

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The toilet seats would be purchased by hospitals and issued to heart failure patients after discharge, it added. Pixabay

Hospitals will soon be able to monitor patients with congestive heart failure in the comfort of their own homes, thanks to a new type of toilet-seats that can measure biometrics during “natural” processes.

The toilet seats are equipped to measure the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart, and can monitor heart rate, blood pressure, blood oxygenation levels, and the patient’s weight and stroke volume, which is the amount of blood pumped out of the heart at every beat.

Created by a team of researchers from the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York, the toilet seats will be brought through the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance process by the researchers’ company Heart Health Intelligence, the institute said in a statement on Wednesday.

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Algorithms in the seats will analyse the data, and with further development warn of deteriorating condition. Pixabay

The toilet seats would be purchased by hospitals and issued to heart failure patients after discharge, it added.

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Algorithms in the seats will analyse the data, and with further development warn of deteriorating condition.

The system will pick up deteriorating conditions before the patients even realise they are symptomatic, said Nicholas Conn, a postdoctoral fellow at RIT and founder and CEO of Heart Health Intelligence. (IANS)

Next Story

Research Identifies Genes Linked to Heart Failure

The research, published journal Circulation, suggests that genetic factors significantly influence the variation in heart structure and function

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Genes
The Study has shown that several Genes known to be important in heart failure also appear to regulate the heart size and function in healthy people. Pixabay

Researchers have found the Genes for earlier identification of people at risk of heart failure and development of new treatments.

The research team applied an artificial intelligence (AI) technique to analyse the heart MRI images of 17,000 healthy UK Biobank volunteers and found that genetic factors accounted for 22-39 per cent of variation in the size and function of the heart’s left ventricle, the organ’s main pumping chamber.

Enlargement and reduced pumping function of the left ventricle can lead to heart failure, the study said.

“It is exciting that the state-of-the-art AI techniques now allow rapid and accurate measurement of the tens of thousands of heart MRI images required for genetic studies,” said study lead researcher Nay Aung from Queen Mary University of London.

“The findings open up the possibility of earlier identification of those at risk of heart failure and of new targeted treatments,” Aung said.

The research, published journal Circulation, suggests that genetic factors significantly influence the variation in heart structure and function.

The team identified 14 regions in the human genome associated with the size and function of the left ventricle – each containing genes that regulate the early development of heart chambers and the contraction of heart muscle.

Genes
Researchers have found the Genes for earlier identification of people at risk of heart failure and development of new treatments. Pixabay

Previous studies have shown that differences in the size and function of the heart are partly influenced by genes but the researchers have not really understood the extent of that genetic influence.

This study has shown that several genes known to be important in heart failure also appear to regulate the heart size and function in healthy people.

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“That understanding of the genetic basis of heart structure and function in the general population improves our knowledge of how heart failure evolves,” said study researcher Steffen Petersen. (IANS)