Friday, September 18, 2020
Home Life Style Health & Fitness Smartphone Apps Not Useful to Spot Melanoma Skin Cancer

Smartphone Apps Not Useful to Spot Melanoma Skin Cancer

Smartphone apps not reliable to spot skin cancer

Smartphone apps that assess the suspicious moles can’t be relied upon to detect all skin cancer cases, researchers have found. Also, the regulatory mechanism for these apps doesn’t provide adequate protection to the public, according to a study published in the journal The BMJ.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), 2-3 million non-melanoma and 132,000 melanoma skin cancer cases occur globally each year.

“Our review found poor and variable performance of algorithm-based smartphone apps. These apps have not yet shown sufficient promise to recommend their use,” said study authors from the University of Warwick, the UK.

Apps, using artificial intelligence (AI), offer the possibility of early detection and treatment of suspicious moles. But they could be harmful, particularly if false reassurance caused delay in people seeking medical advice, the researchers said.

Skin cancer
According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), 2-3 million non-melanoma and 132,000 melanoma skin cancer cases occur globally each year. Pixabay

In Europe, two apps (SkinVision and SkinScan) are available. They are regulated as class I medical devices (deemed to have low to moderate risk to the user). No apps have the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval.

A previous expert review of such apps suggested that there was a high chance of skin cancers being missed.

For the study, the researchers examined the validity and findings of researches, looking at the accuracy of algorithm-based smartphone ‘skin’ apps.

Also, study participants were not tracked to identify cancer cases, missed by the apps.

SkinScan was evaluated in a single study of 15 moles with five melanomas. The app didn’t identify any of the melanomas.

SkinVision was evaluated in two studies. One study of 108 moles (35 cancerous or precancerous moles) achieved a sensitivity of 88 per cent and a specificity of 79 per cent.

Also Read- Higher Testosterone Levels may Lead to Type 2 Diabetes in Women: Study

It meant 12 per cent patients with cancerous or precancerous moles would be missed, while 21 per cent of those non-problematic moles could be identified as potentially cancerous.

The study authors say in a population of 1,000 users in which three per cent have melanoma, SkinVision could still miss four of 30 melanomas and 200 people would wrongly be told their mole was of high concern. (IANS)

STAY CONNECTED

19,152FansLike
362FollowersFollow
1,773FollowersFollow

Most Popular

Neglected Children More Likely To Have Teen Pregnancy: Study

Researchers have found that children who experience neglect are seven times more likely than other abuse victims to have a teen pregnancy. The study, published...

Sakharam Binder: Play That Explores Idea Of Censorship

Back in the early 1970s, Marathi playwright Vijay Tendulkar's play 'Sakharam Binder' -- which features the character of a bookbinder who 'takes in' women...

Patients With Covid-19 Likely To Diagnose With A Heart Stroke

Researchers have found that Covid-19 may be diagnosed on the same emergency scans intended to diagnose stroke. The findings published in the American Journal of...

Asian-Americans Experience Increased Racism Since Covid-19: Report

A report released by a US civil rights group showed Asian-Americans have experienced increased racism since the Covid-19 pandemic hit the country more than...

Hair Tips By Actress Kajol

Actress Kajol has often sported bouncy curls, and it is not too difficult to have hair like hers, she assures. Sharing a candid photo taken...

Twitter Halts Transparency Web Series Promotion. Is Twitter Biased?

By NewsGram Desk Twitter, a well-known platform to share ideas, thoughts, spread awareness, advertise our new ideas and projects, is suddenly taking down advertisements and...

Traditional Matchmaking Holds a Lot of Prejudiced, Preconceived Notions: Physician Rupam Kaur

By Siddhi Jain For Rupam Kaur, an Indian-American physician, the pursuit of finding love a second time took more than the traditional formula of meeting...

10 Facts on How Mosquitoes are One of the Deadliest Creatures in the World

A warmer climate, travel and trade are helping to spread mosquito-borne diseases as a deadly beast smaller than a paper clip poses a threat...

Recent Comments

Donate to NewsGram to support quality journalism.
x