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Using Phones While Shopping May Make You Buy More, Says Study

For the study, published in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, the researchers observed more than 230 participants in a simulated shopping task

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People who use their mobile phones for making calls or listening to music while shopping are more likely to make unplanned purchases and forget items they had planned to buy, says a study.

The research team observed this effect even when phones were only used for part of the shopping trip.

“Our finding that phone use that is unrelated to shopping negatively affects shopping behaviour was in stark contrast to beliefs held by consumers,” said study author Michael Sciandra from Fairfield University, US.

Shopping mall in India. Image source: worldbase9.com

For the study, published in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, the researchers observed more than 230 participants in a simulated shopping task.

They found that consumers who are highly dependent upon mobile phones, characterised by excessive use of and reliance on the device, were the most at risk of deviating from a shopping plan while engaging in shopping-unrelated mobile phone use.

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“Mobile phones are quickly becoming the principal distractor for many consumers and they offer a unique form of interruption. Our findings may influence consumers’ attitudes towards mobile phone use while shopping and persuade them to reflect on how these devices impact our lives, both positively and negatively,” Sciandra added. (IANS)

Next Story

Smartphones Can Also Help Patients to Take Medicines on Time: Research

This study tested the impact of a smartphone application on medication compliance

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Researchers have found that a simple Smartphone apps can be a cost effective way of helping these patients take their medicines for the period prescribed. Pixabay

The smartphones are now frequently blamed for a lot of health problems, but it appears that the device may also have a positive impact on heart patients.

Researchers have found that a simple app can be a cost effective way of helping these patients take their medicines for the period prescribed, thereby reducing risk of premature death.

Following a heart attack, patients are prescribed medications to prevent another event.

However, one in four patients discontinue at least one drug in the first 30 days after discharge from hospital.

This leads to poor symptom control and an increased likelihood of rehospitalisation and premature death. There is currently no simple and cost-effective strategy to improve adherence.

The study presented at the 45th Argentine Congress of Cardiology (SAC 2019) held in Buenos Aires showed that heart patients using a smartphone app reminder are more likely to take their medication than those who receive written instructions.

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For those assigned to the Smartphone group, the prescribed medication schedule was uploaded to the digital application, and an alarm would ring each time a pill should be taken. Pixabay

“We hypothesised that the app would increase adherence by 30 per cent, but the impact was even greater,” said study author Cristian M. Garmendia, of the Cardiovascular Institute of Buenos Aires.

“Patients using the app were alerted to take their pills. They also had better knowledge about why they had been prescribed each medication and could check compliance with their doctor.”

This study tested the impact of a smartphone application on medication compliance. A total of 90 heart attack patients admitted to hospital were randomly allocated to the app or detailed written information (standard care).

Adherence to medical treatment was measured at 90 days using the Morisky Medical Adherence Scale (MMAS-8).

Smartphones
The smartphones are now frequently blamed for a lot of health problems, but it appears that the device may also have a positive impact on heart patients. Pixabay

For those assigned to the smartphone group, the prescribed medication schedule was uploaded to the digital application, and an alarm would ring each time a pill should be taken.

After taking the pills, patients confirmed it in the application. Doctors could check daily adherence using a professional digital platform linked to the patient’s smartphone.

The average age of patients in the study was 63 years.

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At 90 days, significantly more patients in the digital application group were correctly taking their pills (65 per cent) compared to those who received standard care (21 per cent), said the study. (IANS)