Wednesday February 19, 2020

Smokers Notice Health Warnings More on Plain-Packaged Cigarettes

For the study, the team included 1,865 current smokers aged 16 and above

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Warnings used on standardised packs were novel and larger than those on fully-branded packs - and displayed pictorial images on both main display areas, the team said. Pixabay

Health warnings on plain-packaged cigarettes affect smokers more than those marked on branded packs, finds a new study.

Warnings used on standardised packs were novel and larger than those on fully-branded packs – and displayed pictorial images on both main display areas, the team said.

“Consistent with the broad objectives of standardised packaging, our research found that it was associated with increased warning salience, and thoughts about risks and quitting,” said lead researcher Crawford Moodie from the University of Stirling in Scotland.

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The study showed that smokers who bought standardised packs were more likely to have noticed and read the warnings compared to those who had never used standardised packs. Pixabay

“This study adds to the growing body of evidence that standardised packaging reduces the appeal of tobacco products,” said George Butterworth, Senior Policy Manager at Cancer Research, UK.

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The study showed that smokers who bought standardised packs were more likely to have noticed and read the warnings compared to those who had never used standardised packs.

Those who bought standardised packs also thought about the health risks of smoking and quitting and were more likely to have noticed a stop smoking sign on packs. For the study, the team included 1,865 current smokers aged 16 and above. (IANS)

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Cigarette Smoking Associated with Poor Mental Health: Researchers

In light of the new findings, the researchers said they would like to see policymakers take into account mental health effects of smoking, as well

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If boys start smoking pot in early teenage life, they may be at a higher risk of developing drug problem as a young adult, a new study has said.
Early smoking can lead to drug problems in boys. Pixabay

Researchers have found that smoking not only causes physical damage, but is also detrimental to mental health.

According to the study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, the research team from Hebrew University of Jerusalem, University of Belgrade and University of Pristina together, surveyed more than 2,000 students enrolled at Serbian universities with differing socio-political and economic environments.

They found that students who smoked had rates of clinical depression that were twice to three times higher than did their non-smoking peers.

“Our study adds to the growing body of evidence that smoking and depression are closely linked,” while it may be too early to say that smoking causes depression, tobacco does appear to have an adverse effect on our mental health,” said study lead author Hagai Levine at Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel.

According to the researchers, specifically, at the University of Pristina, 14 per cent of smokers suffered from depression as opposed to four per cent of their non-smoking peers, and at Belgrade University the numbers were 19 per cent to 11 per cent, respectively.

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Smoker’s Face– a condition where smokers look older than they are, is just one of many negative effects caused by heavy Smoking, researchers have warned. Pixabay

Further, no matter what their economic or socio-political backgrounds, students who smoked also had higher rates of depressive symptoms and lower mental health scores (such as, vitality and social functioning) compared to non-smoking students.

In light of the new findings, the researchers said they would like to see policymakers take into account mental health effects of smoking, as well.

Also Read: One Sleepless Night Could Contribute to Alzheimer’s Disease: Research

“I urge universities to advocate for their students’ health by creating ‘Smoke-Free Campuses’ that not only ban smoking on campus but tobacco advertising, too,” Levine said.

“Combined with policies that prevent, screen and treat mental health problems, including addiction, these steps would go a long way towards combating the harmful effects that smoking has on our physical and mental states,” Levine added. (IANS)