Monday June 17, 2019

Smokers Lack Motivation, Get Tired Easily

Besides presenting poorer lung function, exercise capacity, quality of life and symptoms of anxiety and depression, smokers also walked less than non-smokers in daily life, the researchers added

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Smokers Lack Motivation, Get Tired Easily
Smokers Lack Motivation, Get Tired Easily. Pixabay

Regular smoking habits may lead you to suffer anxiety and depression which, in turn, make you less physically active and motivated in daily life.

The research, led by Karina Furlanetto from Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Brazil, is the first study to show that smokers are less physically active than non-smokers.

“Our research has demonstrated a reduction in the objectively measured level of physical activity in daily life of adult smokers compared with non-smokers,” said Furlanetto.

Besides presenting poorer lung function, exercise capacity, quality of life and symptoms of anxiety and depression, smokers also walked less than non-smokers in daily life, the researchers added.

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Representational image. Pixabay

They took 60 smokers and 50 non-smokers and asked to wear a pedometer for a minimum of 12 hours per day, over 6 days.

The results showed that smokers walked less on a daily basis.

Also Read: Obesity And Smoking: Roadblocks In Arthritis Treatment

When their capacity to take long breaths was tested, their lung function was found to be reduced and this impacted their ability to exercise.

When smokers were asked to rate their own health-related quality of life they reported feeling more tired, and lacked the motivation to change their inactive behaviour, said the study published in the journal Respirology. (IANS)

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WHO Warns More Than 40 Percent of Smokers Globally Die from Lung Diseases

The World Health Organization recommends a number of effective, low-cost measures countries can adopt to reduce tobacco consumption

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FILE - An anti-tobacco warning is seen on a road divider on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, Nov. 4, 2016. VOA

The World Health Organization warns that more than 40 percent of smokers globally die from lung diseases, such as cancer, chronic respiratory diseases and tuberculosis. The warning comes ahead of World No Tobacco Day this Friday, with the theme being, “Don’t let tobacco take your breath away.”

The World Health Organization says that every year, tobacco use kills at least eight million people. The U.N. agency reports 3.3 million users will die from lung-related diseases. This number includes people exposed to second-hand smoke, among them more than 60,000 children under age five who die of lower respiratory infections due to passive smoking.

Vinayak Prasad, the acting director of the WHO’s Department for the Prevention of Noncommunicable Diseases, says the global economic cost of using tobacco is $1.4 trillion. This is due to health expenditures, loss of productivity from illness and other expenses resulting from smoking-related diseases. He says both lives and money could be saved if people stopped smoking.

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Cigarettes don’t contain just nicotine but a range of toxic, carcinogenic chemicals you wouldn’t want near your body. Pixabay

“What we see also is that if people who are smoking, almost 20 percent of the world is smoking, if they quit, some of the benefits actually come very quickly, especially the lung diseases. Within two weeks, the lung functions actually start to become normal,” he said.

The World Health Organization reports that globally, the prevalence of smoking has gone down from 27 percent in 2000 to 20 percent in 2016. But the WHO, notes that the number of tobacco users worldwide has remained stable at 1.1 billion because of population growth.

Kerstin Schotte, WHO technical officer in the same department as Prasad, notes a steeper decline in the prevalence of smoking in wealthier countries, compared to poorer ones.

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The World Health Organization recommends a number of effective, low-cost measures countries can adopt to reduce tobacco consumption. Pixabay

“And, some low-and-middle income countries even have increasing smoking prevalence rates. This is where the tobacco industry is going at the moment,” she said. “They know a little bit that it is a lost cause in Europe and North America, so they are going into the low-and-middle-income countries, targeting especially women and children there.”

ALSO READ: Over 60% E-cigarette Smokers Want to Quit: Study

The World Health Organization recommends a number of effective, low-cost measures countries can adopt to reduce tobacco consumption.

These include the creation of smoke-free environments, imposing a ban on all forms of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship. WHO also suggests putting a high tax on the sale of cigarettes and other tobacco products to make them unaffordable for many, especially young people. (VOA)