Thursday August 22, 2019

Smoking Affects Good Night’s Sleep Too

Here is a wake-up call. Smoking ruins productive sleep, leading to cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, depression and anxiety

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Japan
The new national law bans indoor smoking at schools, hospitals and government offices. Pixabay

Here is a wake-up call. Smoking ruins productive sleep, leading to cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, depression and anxiety.

“This study has found a common pathway whereby cigarette smoke impacts both pulmonary and neurophysiological function. Further, the results suggest the possible therapeutic value of targeting this pathway with compounds that could improve both lung and brain functions in smokers,” said Irfan Rahman, a researcher at the University of Rochester Medical Centre in Rochester, New York.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Rahman and his team found that tobacco smoke affects clock gene expression rhythms in the lung by producing parallel inflammation and depressed levels of brain locomotor activity. A similar reduction was seen in lung tissue from human smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Also Read: Smoking may up risk of hearing loss

They placed two groups of mice in smoking chambers for short-term and long-term tobacco inhalation. One of the groups was exposed to clean air only and the other was exposed to different numbers of cigarettes during the day, said the study published in The FASEB Journal.

Researchers found that mice in smoking chambers were considerably less active following smoke exposure. (IANS)

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Reduce Heart Disease Risk by Quitting Smoking

The cardiovascular system begins to heal relatively quickly after quitting smoking

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smoking is injurious
Researchers used data from the Framingham Heart Study, a longitudinal study of men and women from Massachusetts, which began enrolment in 1948. Pixabay

Heavy cigarette smokers can reduce their risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) by 39 per cent within five years if they quit, researchers said.

It takes at least five to 10 years and perhaps up to 25 years after quitting, for CVD risk to become as low as that of a person who has never smoked, according to the study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

“The cardiovascular system begins to heal relatively quickly after quitting smoking, even for people who have smoked heavily over decades,” said Hilary Tindle, Founding Director of the Vanderbilt Center for Tobacco Addiction and Lifestyle (ViTAL).

Researchers used data from the Framingham Heart Study, a longitudinal study of men and women from Massachusetts, which began enrolment in 1948.

smoking is injurious
Heavy cigarette smokers can reduce their risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) by 39 per cent within five years if they quit. Pixabay

Also Read: New Study Suggests Living Near Parks and Nature Linked to Greater Happiness

The study used prospective data from 1954 through 2014 from 8,770 participants to determine the effect of lifetime smoking and smoking cessation on the risk of CVD, which includes myocardial infarction, stroke, CVD death and heart failure.

“Our team documented what happens to CVD risk after quitting smoking relative to people who continued to smoke and to those who never smoked,” said study lead author Meredith Duncan from Vanderbilt University. (IANS)