Tuesday June 25, 2019

Smoking Habits May Harm Breastfeeding, Newborns at Risk

Smoking habits have made breastfeeding a severe risk for the newborn

0
//
Smoking pregnant lady outside hospital.

Women, please take note. New mothers exposed to cigarette smoke in their homes may stop breastfeeding sooner as compared to those who are not exposed to second-hand smoke, a new study suggests.

The study, published in the journal Breastfeeding Medicine, found that exposure to household smokers had a substantial negative effect on breastfeeding practices.

“Our study showed that just being in a smoking household — whether it was the husband, mother or member of the extended family — reduced the time that a child was breast fed,” said lead author Marie Tarrant, professor at the University of British Columbia’s Okanagan Campus in Canada.

“In fact, the more smokers there were in the home, the shorter the breastfeeding duration,” Tarrant added.

Smoking affects the health of new-born babies as breastfeeding is not safe.
Smoking affects the health of new-born babies as breastfeeding is not safe.

For the study, the research team involved more than 1,200 women from four large hospitals in Hong Kong.

The researchers found that more than one-third of participants had partners or other household members who smoked. And fathers who smoked were significantly less likely to prefer breastfeeding when compared with non-smoking partners.

“Our study did show that smoking partners may affect the mother’s decision to stop breastfeeding and that paternal and household smoking exposure is strongly associated with a shorter breastfeeding duration,” Tarrant said.

According to the researchers, nicotine is transmitted in the breastmilk to the child and it may reduce the overall quantity of the breastmilk. There is also the concern regarding the environmental exposure of second-hand smoke on the child

Also Read: New Mothers are Now Increasingly Adopting Homeopathic Remedies to Treat Numerous Breastfeeding Difficulties

“We know the effects of environmental tobacco smoke on young babies is very detrimental as babies who are around smoking are more like to get respiratory infections and other experience other respiratory problems,” Tarrant said.

“However, if a mother is breastfeeding, the benefits of her doing that still outweigh the negative effects of the smoking as long as she maintains good smoking hygiene and doesn’t expose the baby to tobacco smoke.” (IANS)

Next Story

Smoking May Increase Risk of Developing Hypertension, Warn Researchers

The results were published in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology

0
FILE - New findings show that smoking causes devastating genetic damage, or mutations, in the cells of various organs in the body. VOA

Smoking may increase the risk of developing hypertension by impairing the body’s blood pressure autocorrect system, warn researchers.

“The human body has a buffering system that continuously monitors and maintains a healthy blood pressure. If blood pressure drops, a response called muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) is triggered to bring blood pressure back up to normal levels,” said Lawrence Sinoway from Penn State University in the US.

An additional system — called the baroreflex — helps correct if blood pressure gets too high, he added.

According to Sinoway, the study found that after a burst of MSNA, the rise in blood pressure in a chronic smoker was about twice as great as in a non-smoker, pushing blood pressure to unhealthy levels. The researchers suspect that impairment of baroreflex may be the culprit.

“When the sympathetic nervous system fires, like with MSNA, your blood pressure rises and then a series of things happen to buffer that increase, to try to attenuate it,” Sinoway said.

“We think that in smokers, that buffering — the baroreflex — is impaired.”

Other than chronic diseases, lifestyle habits like smoking causes cancer too. Pixabay
Other than chronic diseases, lifestyle habits like smoking causes cancer too. Pixabay

The results suggest that this impairment may be connected to hypertension, said Jian Cui, Associate Professor at Penn State College of Medicine.

“The greater rise in blood pressure in response to MSNA may contribute to a higher resting blood pressure level in smokers without hypertension,” Cui said.

“It’s possible that this higher response to MSNA could also contribute to the eventual development of hypertension,” Cui added.

Also Read- Style Your Bottom Wear Well to Look Like a Diva

The researchers said that while previous research has found a link between chronic smokers and higher levels of MSNA bursts, less was known about what happened to blood pressure after these bursts.

For the study, the researchers examined 60 participants — 18 smokers and 42 non-smokers. None of the participants had hypertension.

The results were published in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. (IANS)