Friday May 24, 2019

Smoking Marijuana May Lead to Junk Food Binge

"These might seem like small numbers. But they're statistically and economically significant,"

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Marijuana, Canada
An employee inspects the leaf of a cannabis plant at a medical marijuana plantation in northern Israel. (VOA)

Legalising recreational marijuana can increase junk food sales, which may contribute to obesity, a major risk factor for diseases like Type-2 diabetes heart disease as well as various cancers, say researchers.

The team found a link between recreational marijuana legalisation and increased consumption of certain high-calorie foods, suggesting there may be something more substantial to the urban myth of “the munchies”.

According to the researchers, including Michele Baggio from the University of Connecticut, people after smoking marijuana go on a junk food binge, consuming mass quantities of chips, cookies.

While some neuroscientists have hypotheses, there remains no formal causal evidence to support this notorious effect of marijuana on the human brain, they said.

Israel, Marijauna
An Israeli woman works at Tikkun Olam medical cannabis farm, near the northern Israeli city of Safed, Israel, Nov. 1, 2012. Late Tuesday, Dec. 25, 2018, Israel’s parliament unanimously approved a law to permit exports of medical marijuana. VOA

For the study, published in the journal Social Science Research Network, the team looked at data on monthly purchases of cookies, chips and ice cream from grocery, convenience, drug and mass distribution stores in more than 2,000 countries in the US over a 10-year period.

The team compared purchasing trends to the implementation dates for recreational marijuana laws in states including Colorado, Oregon, and Washington.

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Their analysis showed that legalising recreational marijuana led to a 3.1 per cent increase in ice cream purchases, a 4.1 per cent increase in cookie purchases, and a 5.3 per cent increase in chip purchases immediately after recreational marijuana sales began.

“These might seem like small numbers. But they’re statistically and economically significant,” Baggio said. (IANS)

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Research Reveals, Cancer Patients Are More Likely To Use Marijuana

"Medical marijuana legislation has previously been associated with reduction in hospitalisations related to opioid dependence or abuse, suggesting if patients are in fact substituting marijuana for opioid, this may introduce an opportunity for reducing opioid-related morbidity and mortality,"

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The researchers found significantly increased use of marijuana over time -- likely reflecting increased availability due to legislative changes -- but they found stable rates of opioid use. Pixabay

Many cancer patients use marijuana and its usage has increased, a new study suggests. The findings, published in the journal CANCER, indicate 40.3 per cent cancer patients used marijuana within the past year, compared with 38 per cent of respondents without cancer.

“Prospective clinical trials are needed to quantify the efficacy of marijuana in cancer-specific pain as well as the risk of opioid misuse in this patient population,” said co-author Kathryn Ries Tringale from the University of California, San Diego.

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They found patients with cancer were more likely to use prescription opioids than adults without cancer — 13.9 per cent versus 6.4 per cent. Pixabay

For the study, 826 people with cancer were matched to 1,652 controls.

The researchers found significantly increased use of marijuana over time — likely reflecting increased availability due to legislative changes — but they found stable rates of opioid use.

Doctor

“Prospective clinical trials are needed to quantify the efficacy of marijuana in cancer-specific pain as well as the risk of opioid misuse in this patient population,” said co-author Kathryn Ries Tringale from the University of California, San Diego. VOA

They found patients with cancer were more likely to use prescription opioids than adults without cancer — 13.9 per cent versus 6.4 per cent.

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“Medical marijuana legislation has previously been associated with reduction in hospitalisations related to opioid dependence or abuse, suggesting if patients are in fact substituting marijuana for opioid, this may introduce an opportunity for reducing opioid-related morbidity and mortality,” said lead author Jona Hattangadi-Gluth from the varsity. (IANS)