Sunday January 26, 2020

Smoking And Obesity May Have Negative Effects on Bone Health

Obesity and smoking are currently considered among the two most important preventable causes of poor health in developed nations, and both are modifiable risk factors

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Smoking
Lifestyle interventions focusing on weight loss and Smoking cessation should be emphasized whenever possible. Pixabay

Both obesity and Smoking can have negative effects on bone health, say researchers, adding they also impact healing in patients who have undergone surgery for fractures of the wrist, or the distal radius, among the most common bone fractures.

“Obesity and smoking are currently considered among the two most important preventable causes of poor health in developed nations, and both are modifiable risk factors,” said senior author Tamara D. Rozental from Harvard University.

For the study, published in the Journal of Hand Surgery, the research team analysed data on patients surgically treated for a distal radius fracture between 2006 and 2017 at two trauma centers.

The 200 patients were divided into obese and non-obese groups (39 and 161 patients, respectively) and were also characterised as current, former, and never smokers (20, 32, and 148 patients, respectively) based on self-reported cigarette use.

At three-month and one-year follow-ups after surgery, both the obese and non-obese groups achieved acceptable scores that pertained to patient-reported function in the upper extremity – close to those of the general population.

The two groups were also similar in regards to range of motion and bone alignment.

At three months, smokers demonstrated worse scores related to arm, shoulder, and hand function and a lower percentage of healed fractures, but these effects improved over the course of a year.

Complications were similar between groups.

Smoking
Both Obesity and Smoking can have negative effects on bone health, say researchers, adding they also impact healing in patients who have undergone surgery for fractures of the wrist, or the distal radius, among the most common bone fractures. Pixabay

“Overall we found that we can achieve excellent clinical and radiographic outcomes with surgery for displaced wrist fractures in patients who are obese and in those who smoke,” said Rozental.

The results show that treatment for distal radius fractures in obese and smoking patients is safe, and these patients may be treated like the general population with similar long-term results.

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Their short-term outcomes, however, demonstrate higher disability and, in the case of smokers, slower fracture healing,” Rozental added.

“As such, we believe that lifestyle interventions focusing on weight loss and smoking cessation should be emphasized whenever possible,” she said. (IANS)

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Here’s Why Light Alcohol Consumption Might Also Increase Cancer Risk

The researchers found an almost linear association between cancer risk and alcohol consumption

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Alcohol
In a study published in the journal Cancer, the overall cancer risk appeared to be the lowest at zero alcohol consumption. Pixabay

If you thought one-two drinks a day would not do any harm, think again. Researchers in Japan have found that even light alcohol consumption might increase the cancer risk.

In the study published in the journal Cancer, the overall cancer risk appeared to be the lowest at zero alcohol consumption. The elevated risk appeared to be explained by alcohol-related cancer risk across relatively common sites, including the colorectum, stomach, breast, prostate and esophagus.

“In Japan, the primary cause of death is cancer,” said one of the researchers Masayoshi Zaitsu from The University of Tokyo. “Given the current burden of overall cancer incidence, we should further encourage promoting public education about alcohol-related cancer risk,” Zaitsu said. The team examined clinical data on 63,232 patients with cancer and 63,232 controls matched for sex, age, hospital admission date, and admitting hospital. The data was gathered from 33 general hospitals in Japan.

All participants reported their average daily amount of standardised alcohol units and the duration of drinking. One standardised drink containing 23 grams of ethanol was equivalent to one 180-ml cup of Japanese sake, one 500-ml bottle of beer, one 180-ml glass of wine, or one 60-ml cup of whiskey.

Drink, Alcohol, Cup, Whiskey, The Drink
If you thought one-two drinks a day would not do any harm, think again. Researchers in Japan have found that even light alcohol consumption might increase the cancer risk. Pixabay

The researchers found an almost linear association between cancer risk and alcohol consumption. A light level of drinking at 10-drink-year point, for example, one drink per day for 10 years or two drinks per day for five years would increase cancer risk by five per cent, the findings showed.

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Those who drank two or fewer drinks a day had an elevated cancer risk regardless of how long they had consumed alcohol. Also, analyses classified by sex, drinking/smoking behaviours and occupational class mostly showed the same patterns. (IANS)